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jhansen
12-20-2006, 10:05 PM
Hi, my name is Jeff and I am a lurker on the :borg: stromtrooper site. (Let the verbal abuse begin). I have read the 1k info threads and it seems that the 1k folks either have no problems with their machines or it is absolutely the worst experience in trying to get all the bugs out of the fuel system ie TB, fuel control box, etc. Do those of you who have 1ks have those problems. The "wee people" seem to relish in the fact that they have no problems with their bikes and let the 1k folk know it. Comments? No, Chuck, I am not in the market for a 1k. :trust:

Tourmeister
12-20-2006, 10:43 PM
Are you asking for a review? :-P

kurt
12-20-2006, 10:49 PM
My '06 had no issues with FI or clutch chatter. They had completely reworked both by then. I also didn't find the windscreen to be that bad either.

Chirpy
12-20-2006, 11:19 PM
In the week and a half he had it :lol2:

Mitchel
12-20-2006, 11:25 PM
I had an '02 V-Strom for a little over a year with zero problems. The windscreen sucked, and the seat was not that great, but overall a good bike!

Gilk51
12-20-2006, 11:32 PM
No, Chuck, I am not in the market for a 1k. :trust:
From reading 2 V-Strom forums the past two years, most of the DL1000 problems were with the 02-03 models - the first two years. Main problems were clutch basket and 3000 RPM "chudder".

There is an occasional "lemon" in the later models but not near as bad as the first two years.

STrider
12-21-2006, 12:19 AM
In the week and a half he had it :lol2:

post of the year.

HiSPL
12-21-2006, 12:34 AM
I've had to remap mine, but it only took about twenty minutes. It runs great now. It ran great before, unless you stayed at 3000 rpm for too long, then it would stumble and hiccup.

One mod I would suggest is the Master Mike spacers. You don't realize how much they are needed until after you get them. They make a world of difference in tranny smoothness.

I would also recommend going up a couple teeth in the rear sprocket (or down one in front). It makes the gear spread much more usable in town and on the highway.

The big V is a great bike. I have not had to do anything to it that I didn't do to my other bikes. Fixing ergo's and tuning for your riding style goes hand in hand with motorcycling. Frankly, I enjoy molding the bike to fit me!

As always, YMMV and keep the rubber side down!

Squeaky
12-21-2006, 01:22 AM
post of the year.

+1 :clap:

I've not had any real issues with my 03. It's time to start doing some of the bigger maintenance items, but nothing out of the ordinary. I've probably not cared for it as well as some (it's been ridden hard and put away wet more often than not) but it continues to perform almost flawlessly. :rider:

jhansen
12-21-2006, 01:47 AM
Are you asking for a review? :-P
Wasn't looking for a review as such, but just wanted to know if the problems are as wide spread as it seems. A 1k would be a nice addition but "She who must be obeyed" says one at a time. :zen:

kurt
12-21-2006, 07:19 AM
post of the year.

Nah, too easy. That's like claiming Paris's or Britney's antics to be a scandal. :-P

Sleepy Weasel
12-21-2006, 11:38 PM
Nah, too easy.

+1

prhaussies
12-22-2006, 12:02 AM
:rider: I didn't know there were any 1K problems. My wee is still the best (street bike) I have ever had but there are days I wish it were the full blown item. Keep this thread up since I might be tempted one day to move up. There are certainly some suspension issues that need to be addressed but otherwise I am a very happy camper. rh
PS. Merry Christmas to everyone.:sun:

StarWatcher
12-22-2006, 11:06 AM
The "wee people" seem to relish in the fact that they have no problems with their bikes and let the 1k folk know it. Comments?

Just to round things out a little, my experience with the "wee" hasn't been trouble free ....

I bought my 06 Wee in April of this year and had no problems that I noticed until one day the FI trouble light came on during a trip. It turned out that the rear secondary throttle mechanical assembly somehow began to bind up such that the drive motor didn't have enough torque to adjust things properly. A trip to the dealer resulted in a new throttle body assembly and it now runs better than ever.

Over all I'm very happy with the bike and don't hesitate to recommend it to others who are looking.

--Mike

Bandit33
12-22-2006, 11:43 AM
I bought my 03 1K Strom used with about 3000 miles on it. Over the course of the next few thousand miles, it did develop the clutch basket noise, but it was never bad. Since then, the noise has pretty much gone away, I suspect due to using different oil (Motul in my case)....or maybe I just don't notice it anymore!! The bike ran smoothly since I got it, even at the lower 3000 RPM range, pulls smoothly from that range, perhaps this was set right beforehand during the previous ownership or the injectors were set right from the factory. Anyway, it has about 19000 miles on it now and is running great. I generally get anywhere from 45 to 50 MPG with it. It had a tall shield on it when I got it but did not like it so I went with a stock replacement Zero Gravity shield which works well for me.

Don

Centerline
12-24-2006, 01:00 AM
Wasn't looking for a review as such, but just wanted to know if the problems are as wide spread as it seems. A 1k would be a nice addition but "She who must be obeyed" says one at a time. :zen:

My "She who must be obeyed" said the same thing...with the first one, and now there are three of the beasts..
anyhow if I were to buy a 'Strom, (and nearly did) it would be the DL1000.

cookcoeng
12-27-2006, 06:30 PM
My '03 has been problem free the last 1000 miles that I've had it (9000 total) and the previous owners didn't do much to it. I've got the chudder around 3000-3500 RPM, but its barely noticeable. Low rpm & low speed I get some surging, which I believe is one of the things the remapping is supposed to help. The ergos have been a source of most of my minor compliants. The Corbin seat is about 100x better than stock, and I'm on the 3rd combo of handlebars and risers, about to try pro-taper hi-bends next.

The Tomcat
01-26-2007, 06:13 PM
Had mine (06 DL1000) since Oct. 06. No problems at all. Had to adjust the Idle to 1200rpm but otherwiseno problems. One of the best bikes I have had. Planning on some long summer trips.

coupe930
01-26-2007, 07:14 PM
I bought my 03 new in California, in preparation for quiting my job, broke it in and rode it back to TX. It has the typical roughness around 3000 RPM, but that only seems to be a minor irritant. I haven't had any other problems in over 20,000 miles. Some people complain bitterly about buffeting with the stock windscreen, but it has not been a problem for me (5' 10"). I do notice buffeting if I get right behind a semi at highway speeds. Other people complain about the seat. My seat has always been very comfortable, I think that this is a very individual thing. The seat on my BMW F650 was intolerable after 45 minutes. I would have to stop and get off. I'm sure other people found the BMW seat to their liking. I have heard other riders complain about the effects of side winds. Frankly, my DL1000 is fine in side winds. I rode across New Mexico in what seemed to be a constant 20 MPH side wind with gusts and it was just fine. My old Ducati with all of the fairing making for a real slab sided bike forced me to slow down and move to the slow lane on a couple of occasions.

Different strokes for different folks I guess.

Pat McDonald

bones
02-20-2007, 10:51 AM
I think in teh next year or so my KLR will go up for sale and a one liter Wee will take it's place. :rider:

h2000fb
03-08-2007, 10:49 PM
My second bike is a 04 DL-1000. No problems, pulls strong, no real problems at with low rpm jerk over 2500rpm. Very smooth, trouble free. A buddy has an 03 DL-1000. Fine bike, does not run quite as strong, noticable 3k vibe. We did two things that tremendously improved smoothness and acceleration.
First, we removed the top butterflys so when you opened the throttle you got full effect and do not have to wait for secondaries to open, then second, we made a home-made manometer and sinc'd the carbs. End result was over 2500rpm pull was noticable smoother, and low end power now easily allows for wheelies. Before you really had to work to get tire off ground. Much easier now... that was measurable and noticable.

Neither bike is babied. Neither has had any noises or problems. His 03 has approx 30,000 miles on it maybe?

Squeaky
03-08-2007, 10:54 PM
I think it's time for me to remove the butterfly/secondary thing. I've got some noticeable roughness at low RPMs.

My fix so far has been to rev 'er up!

RTL
03-09-2007, 11:31 PM
Bought my DL1000K3 a few months back with about 10K on the odometer. It ran a little rough below 3K rpm so I put my name on the loaner Yosh box list on the V-Strom web site. One step richer setting at idle and low rpm range completely fixed my low rpm stumble and roughness. I have drilled exhaust, removed secondary butterflies, stiffer fork springs, 5 wt fork oil, Stebel horn, shortened rear fender, and balanced throttle bodies. Coming soon new tires, rear shock preload spacer, corrected rear drive sproket spacers and Leo Vince SBK slip-on exhaust.

kurt
03-09-2007, 11:42 PM
I think it's time for me to remove the butterfly/secondary thing. I've got some noticeable roughness at low RPMs.

My fix so far has been to rev 'er up!

Or maybe it's time for a valve adjustment. ;-)

Squeaky
03-09-2007, 11:43 PM
Or maybe it's time for a valve adjustment. ;-)

Checked the valves at the tech day last month.
Well, we checked the back half since I didn't know I'd have to drain the radiator for the front...

It was all in spec. On the tighter end of the range, but all completely in spec. In another 5k or so I'm going to take it apart and do the whole thing along with the TB sync.

Squeaky
03-09-2007, 11:45 PM
I've never really understood the Yosh thing. If someone with more knowledge and experience thinks it will make a difference and can help, then I'll do it (whatever "it" is).

RTL
03-09-2007, 11:58 PM
The Yoshimura box is a pretty simple contraption that uses resistors and potentiometers to adjust the fuel injection program on the V-strom CPU. If I remember right it can adjust fuel injection at idle and three different rpm ranges. Many Stroms, especially the '02 and '03 models suffer from slight to severe over lean fuel injection settings in the idle and low rpm ranges. The Yosh box allows you to correct that in a matter of minutes. Caution: if you get too aggresive and go too rich your fuel economy will suffer. Literature with the Yosh box suggests that it is best used with an exhaust gas analyzer. Since I did not have one at my disposal I just used settings that seemed most common for my '03 Strom. There is allot of info out there on this topic.

Ghost Rider
03-10-2007, 02:35 AM
Bought my 06 V-Strom when I got back from Iraq last August. ZERO problems with the bike. I made the customary changes to the ergos to accommodate my riding prefereces.

I often refer to my V-Strom as my Uber-Commuter. Very capable and comfortable. When I get home later this year, I'll probably swap out the oem exhaust bits for something in carbon-fiber and will look at EFI mapping option then. Won't try to make it something it is not, but a few mods are on my list.

With all of the good reviews, why not a "Wee"? Well, once upon a time... when I was single, and no one questioned my purchases, I had quite a stable of motorcycles. Keeping a reconditioned old motorcyle in the den was not just a matter of necessity because the garage was full, it was art. Even though I married a woman who's family makes a living from working in the motorcycle industry, having kids has a way of "thinning the heard" when it came to motorcycles. Actually, we probably have just as many bikes as ever, just fewer of them are mine. Getting the bigger Strom was a good fit and allowed me to consolidate "Daddy's" toys to just a few. If I were going to explore off the beaten path, I'd chose a "Wee". However, I knew that the bike would be ridden mostly at highway speeds, with only the occasional dirt road, so I chose the bigger of the two. For my riding needs it has been a great bike.

Gilk51
03-10-2007, 09:56 AM
Seems like most of the discussion about EFI problems with the 1000 are the 02-04 (and of those, mostly 02-03) models. Most of the owners with K5 and later don't complain about the problems...

h2000fb
03-10-2007, 08:09 PM
I think it's time for me to remove the butterfly/secondary thing. I've got some noticeable roughness at low RPMs.

My fix so far has been to rev 'er up!

We really felt the throttle body sinc was probably the solution to the roughness while the removal of the seconday gave us power. I would bet if you checked your TBS, you would find it off. My buddy's was supposedly done, but it was WAY off by dealer? If they are not sinc'd, you won't have equal gas delivery to each cylinder and would cause roughness. This was easy to do.

achesley
05-30-2008, 04:04 PM
Just saw this thread this afternoon and figured I'd do my 2 C.
I bought an '06 DL1000 after 11 years on BMW GS types. I noticed a light ruff spot crossing 2900 to 3000 in 1st and 2nd gear at about 1/4 throttle. When on tour in the Serrias of Cal later that summer, I really noticed it to the tune of the engine almost quiting coming out of hairpins in 2nd at say 2500 and accelerating passed the 2900-3000. A few times it just really shook the bike. So , resorted to clutch slipping.
Upon getting home, I went thru the valves > some at the bottom of the range but nothing endangering. But adjusted everyone to the top end of the scale. Pull off the air cleaner and check the boots on the heads for cracks or loose connections, ditto for the boots on top of the injector bodies to the air box. Checked all vacuum connections and added extensions for doing a TBI sync. While there did a Secondary Throttlebody sync. Good there. Put the air cleaner and tank all back together and did a TBI sync with a twin max. Got all right on in the 3000 rpm range. It was not far off anyway.
Still had a problem in the 2900 range. Got a Power Commander III USB and did all kinds of stuff with it including Accelerator pump function. Could dampen its ruff spot but never got rid of it completely.
Next the bike developed a big time surge when accelerating hard in 1st and 2nd. Sprayed WD40 on all the FI boots looking for something I missed. Took the thing down to the heads on the FI system looking for something. Coated all with grease and assembled again re syncing everything. Still the ruff spot , still the moderate surge.
Last time hit me in the wrong mood. Called a Suzuki dealer in Lake Charles. He had a left over '07 Bandit. He ended up with the DL1000 and now I'm pretty happy with my new Bandit. ;-)....

Squeaky
05-30-2008, 04:21 PM
Ok, maybe it's just me, but I don't expect much pull or power below about 3200 rpm. I tend to keep it at 4k or more, and it just LOVES to zing through turns at 6k+ :rider:

...maybe that's why everyone else gets better mileage than I do? :scratch:

achesley
05-31-2008, 06:31 AM
Very true on the power below 4grand. But in a tight uturn on slippery roads you don't want very much pull or power. It's smooth delivery at the bottom of the rpm band. I was spoiled from having great lowend powerbands from my XV920RH and then 3 R11 1150 BMWs.
Heck on Gas Mileage. I got everywhere from 36 (80 against a head wind for hours and hours ) to 50 ( tooling about Sequoia and Yosemite ) on a round trip to the Serrias with a bit of checking out Utah and Colorado. Think avg for the trip was about 42. Less than 10% interstate and about 60% 2 lane back roads.

Hang in there

h2000fb
05-31-2008, 10:47 PM
My DL1000 K4 had good low end in the low gears. I would recommend anyone on the 2002-03 to sync carbs themselves with a homemade manometer and remove the secondary butterflies. It does make a difference in smoothness and low/middle power. Special note; if you do a throttle sync, use a homemade manometer as it is much more sensitive than real factory unit. I have seen improvements in using the homemade manometer after having one sync'd on a factory "precision" unit.

achesley
06-01-2008, 05:25 AM
I have both the Twin Max and a mercury job I use to used when working on 4 cyl bikes in the 70's and 80's. The Twin Max is less hassel and more sensitive when you put it on Max Sens setting. Either is good. Have used them back to back on the same bike as a test about 10 years ago when playing with BMW twins.
Now I don't have a lot of use for the Twin Max but never can tell what bike may find it's way into my layer next. ;-)

h2000fb
06-01-2008, 09:57 AM
The manometers we make for the occassion usually use something lighter than mercury in the "loop" lines between the two carbs - like 20 weight oil. Not certain how you would syn 4 cyl very easily with it without multiple checks on different cyl?

DFW_Warrior
06-01-2008, 11:04 AM
I'm with Squeaker on this one. I don't lug my bike, so I don't get those rough spots in the driveline like everyone else seems to get. It's a motorcycle, not a tractor. Rev the thing and it will be fine.

Even on tight slippery u-turns, it doesn't matter. That wrist looking thing on your right arm should do a pretty good job of modulating the power. The only time my bike ever sees below 3500 rpm is when I'm leaving from a stop light.