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View Full Version : Tire pressure paranoia??


chiko
11-10-2004, 07:50 PM
My latest phobia and a gadget to make me feel better.

Accu-Pressure Tire Safety Cap
http://www.accu-pressure.com

I got mine at helmetheadcyclegear
http://www.helmetheadcyclegear.com

Because they let you order one at a time for $5 each. Most other distributors wanted to sell you a 2 pack or 4 pack. The beemer runs 36 in front and 42 in back.

Still in the experimental stage. I will be checking the caps more frequently and confirming it against the digital gauge I got as well.

kurt
11-10-2004, 08:00 PM
I hate to add to your phobia, but Motorcyclist panned them as inaccurate when they tried them. Since they hold down the core on the valve stem continuously, they are prone to leaks, making a non-existant problem a major one. Glad to help. :-D

Tourmeister
11-10-2004, 08:04 PM
There are the kind that mount inside the tire rim and then broadcast to a dash mounted indicator. Some high end cars have these. Personally, if my tires are more than 1-2psi off from their normal pressure, I can feel it in the bike handling. That is accurate enough for me because a difference of only 1-2psi is not a dangerous condition.

Adios,

Bill J. from Austin
11-11-2004, 10:26 AM
a difference of only 1-2psi is not a dangerous condition.
What I've been told is that 1 - 2 psi, while not dangerous, can make a difference in tread life. At the price of new rubber, that was enough to make me (the original "Maintenance? What maintenance?" guy) paranoid about tire pressure! :mrgreen:

Tourmeister
11-11-2004, 01:31 PM
Bill,

:tab That is quite right. It is not that I leave the tires 1-2psi low, that is just how far they have to get before I really start to notice the affect on the handling of the bike. As soon as I notice, I bring the pressure back up.

:tab Believe it or not, on all of the bikes I have owned, none of them ever really lost pressure in the tires. Once inflated, they all tended to stay properly inflated unless they were punctured. I had one or two that were not properly mounted by the shops and they leaked at the bead. Remounting them took care of that. I used to be paranoid about checking them before every ride, but now I just give them a quick visual look before getting on the bike and then use my buttgauge once underway.

:tab This reminds me that I need to get over to Wal Mart and get some replacement CO2 cannisters!

Adios,

Dragwn
11-11-2004, 05:09 PM
There is a discussion on the COG site about the SmartTire set-up. http://www.concours.org/sc/SmarTire.html For anyone interested in how it works etc.

Tourmeister
11-11-2004, 05:10 PM
Is that the one I was talking about that sends the signal to the dash unit?

kurt
11-11-2004, 05:17 PM
There is a discussion on the COG site about the SmartTire set-up. http://www.concours.org/sc/SmarTire.html For anyone interested in how it works etc.

That just looks like way too much trouble to check pressure. :-P I'll spend less time checking it manually over the life of the bike than setting it up once. For a gadget person, it looks pretty cool though.

Bill J. from Austin
11-12-2004, 09:47 AM
Believe it or not, on all of the bikes I have owned, none of them ever really lost pressure in the tires. Once inflated, they all tended to stay properly inflated unless they were punctured.
Hmmm... I've owned this Harley for almost 26 years, and a couple others, besides, and never had a problem with their tube-type tires losing pressure. I've owned my Beemer for 4 years (and three sets of tubeless tires) and they are constantly losing pressure. I figured that was just what tubeless tires do.

Dragwn
11-12-2004, 10:47 AM
I'd just stick to a good pressure gauge and feelin the road, I don't think I need a $200 set-up to tell me my tires are low

MP Simmons
11-13-2004, 05:59 PM
Personally, if my tires are more than 1-2psi off from their normal pressure, I can feel it in the bike handling.

I knew it ! You ARE sensitive.

Tourmeister
11-14-2004, 09:27 PM
I keep telling Beth that I am very sensitive, she's not buying it :shrug:

Dragwn
11-15-2004, 08:00 AM
You're sensitive to pressure... :nana see, you just need more vacation time, away from all those constant pressure changes, no sensitivity training for you :mrgreen:

chiko
12-05-2004, 12:33 PM
:-(
I checked the rear 40# indicator and it didnt show anything on the cap but I checked with my digital and it showed 35#. On closer examination the rear indicator may have been showing yellow subtlely but not obviously.

Checked up front more carefully and the 36# cap was pure green but only had 33# according to the digital gauge. I checked my digital guage against my regular stick type and they are consistent. Accurate is hard to quantify.

Put the indicator caps back on to see if I can get a sense if they are causing the leak as well as being a poor indicator. :-|

Dragwn
12-06-2004, 08:59 AM
Could always try a good set of caps after inflating a checking with a good guage, and go out, take a nice long ride, and check them again, if you needed to you could change back to the indicator caps and ride some more, then check pressure....

Any excuse for a ride right? :mrgreen:

cmcnamee
12-08-2004, 06:48 PM
One publication, Motorcycle Consumer News if my memory serves, did an article on those things a while back. Their conclusion was that the caps were not consistently accurate, that there were major variations between different caps of the same psi rating, and that there was a greater chance of air leaking from the cap since it keeps the valve depressed all the time. They did not seem to be impressed.

I believe that a good guage used regularly is a much better idea.

Carl

chiko
08-27-2008, 09:13 PM
The paranoia continues but I dont think I found the answer.
The caps are crap as everyone indicated so I went with SmarTire which is way more sophisticated.

But the sensors way 1.4 oz which is quite a lot :eek2: if balance is also a concern. I can see why they are no longer supporting there motorcycle version.

I think I will try it but with a skeptical mind.

John Bennett
08-28-2008, 09:59 AM
The paranoia continues

Perhaps tire pressure is not a critical as you think.

I've ridden hundreds of miles on severely under-inflated tires for various reasons. (like 18 psi in Pilot Roads when 38 is called for).

Yeah, it's squishy and bad for the tires, but it's not as critical and dangerous as some people believe.

If I can do that, you should feel comfortable checking your tires once a week with a good digital gauge like I have.

DaveC
08-28-2008, 10:43 AM
I found that the heavy bike touring tires are stiff and make it hard to tell when they are down a few pounds. They have to lose almost 10 #s before you notice and you notice it in slow speed manuvers.
I have also found if the tire was mounted with liquid soap then it is prone to leaking if it is tubeless. I found this little tidbit from a technical bulliten. The soap corroded the aluminum of the rim causeing pitting and this is where the air leaks out. My next rear tire I an going to dress the inside of the rim and smooth out the bead for a better seal.

John Bennett
08-28-2008, 10:58 AM
I have also found if the tire was mounted with liquid soap then it is prone to leaking if it is tubeless. ...from a technical bulliten. The soap corroded the aluminum of the rim causing pitting and this is where the air leaks out.

Interesting. Thanks.

dukey33
08-28-2008, 11:34 AM
Tire pressure becomes more critical if you are near the load capability of the tire.
The K1200LT is so heavy and uses relatively small tires so it needs a specially rated rear tire. Tire pressure greatly impacts tread life for that bike. Most KLT owners run the rear pressure at 48psi. :eek2:

If you have a relatively large tire on a relatively light bike, then pressure +/-5 pounds may not have much effect at all.

A friend with a V-dub based trike is using relatively large car tires on the rear and can run as low as 15psi with no problems.

DFW_Warrior
08-28-2008, 01:55 PM
I have also found if the tire was mounted with liquid soap then it is prone to leaking if it is tubeless. I found this little tidbit from a technical bulliten. The soap corroded the aluminum of the rim causeing pitting and this is where the air leaks out. My next rear tire I an going to dress the inside of the rim and smooth out the bead for a better seal.

Ruglide my friend. Never mount a tire without it. It is liquid from the tire gods, trust me.

dukey33
08-28-2008, 10:01 PM
Ruglide my friend. Never mount a tire without it. It is liquid from the tire gods, trust me.

That's good stuff.
Have you ever looked at the components?
RuGlyde: water, vegetable oil soap and glycol. :giveup:

I found it at NAPA.

DFW_Warrior
08-28-2008, 11:40 PM
That's good stuff.
Have you ever looked at the components?
RuGlyde: water, vegetable oil soap and glycol. :giveup:

I found it at NAPA.

Oh yeah. Who would have thought something so simple would make changing tires so easy. I still have over half a gallon left and I've probably done close to 200 tires so far.

Mike in Clear Lake
08-28-2008, 11:40 PM
...I found it at NAPA.

I believe NAPA is the only place that carries it.

As for the paranoia, I simply check the (cold) pressure before my rides. A pencil type gauge is sufficiently accurate me thinks. I use a foot pump to top off the tires. On my recent Houston to Del Rio ride the pressure dropped about 3 psi over the 400+ mile trip. Recommended pressure is 29 psi. I carried the foot pump with me in my saddle bags and topped off the tires in the morning (when cold) before my return trip.

Mike

P.S. Also very much recommend the use of Ride-On in your tires.

achesley
09-14-2008, 01:44 AM
tell you want I won't use again to lube tires. Simple Green. I used it once cause I was too lazy to walk to the garage and get my bottle of windex. It ended up dang near welding the rubber to the rim on my KLR. Had to sand and wire brush for awhile to get all the rubber off the wheels. ;-(..
I carry a little slime electric pump on both bikes for topping off or changing pressures from gravel to pave. Don't take but a minute to check pressure on preflight check of bike before leaving for a ride.

chiko
04-12-2009, 07:57 PM
:thumbd:I gave up on SmartTire today.
The sensors were excessively heavy for the motorcycle wheels.

But the critical factor that ended it today was the receiver module. The electrical connection at the back looks hefty and strong but ended up wearing out with the vibrations of the bike. I had it mounted near the instrument cluster and it slightly stressed by the stuff that the instrument cluster mounts to. After several months of vibration, the connector wore out and would not stay connected. The hot and ground wires were intermittent and generally NOT connected.

Its a sealed system and so beyond my ability to repair the connection.

The product was just not designed to rigors of motorcycle use and I can see why the manufacturer abandoned the product line.

STman
04-16-2009, 04:05 PM
I'd just stick to a good pressure gauge and feelin the road, I don't think I need a $200 set-up to tell me my tires are low

I'm with you