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PhilS
12-15-2007, 09:55 AM
I figured this might be a doable thread, and besides, I had a maintenance question - so there!

Anyone tried to access and pull the spark plugs out yet on thier 1250? It seems like a long way down with the cap/coil assy on top plus removing the tank and all.

Thoughts?

terrebandit
12-15-2007, 10:48 AM
Phil,

Its good to pull the tank. Removing a tank on a MC is a basic/necessary step for many important maintenance-related tasks so its good to get familiar with the procedure anyway.

I always remove the tank before pulling the plugs on Bandits. Its easy to get dirt, debris, corosion (rust particles), etc down in those deep spark plug wells next to the plugs. If you remove the tank, you can use your ShopVac to suck out any debris that might have accumulated in there before removing the plugs. If you don't do this, you run the risk of that stuff falling into the combustion chamber which is not good. The last time I changed plugs in mine, I actually had a spark plug compression ring come off an old plug (stupid autolite plugs - never again!) while removing it from the head. Having the tank off the bike allowed me to fish that sucker out of there before installing the new plug.

As for tools?? I just you a 19mm SPARKPLUG socket (the one with the rubber insert) with an 3" extension and rachet to do the job. Go down to Sears and get one. I use the tool kit under the seat for emergencies only, while on the road.

txbanditrydr
12-15-2007, 02:16 PM
As for tools?? I just you a 19mm SPARKPLUG socket (the one with the rubber insert) with an 3" extension and rachet to do the job.

Errrr.... check that buddy. I believe it's an 18 (eighteen) mm plug wrench. :trust:

PhilS
12-15-2007, 06:52 PM
I tried pulling one of the cap plugs/coils off from the side of the engine - not straight up with the tank off and it was a real ****. In fact, I couldn't do it. I assume with the tank off it becomes doable and even easier.......we'll see.

Phil

terrebandit
12-15-2007, 08:02 PM
Errrr.... check that buddy. I believe it's an 18 (eighteen) mm plug wrench. :trust:

I stand corrected... sorry Phil.

Roy
12-18-2007, 12:27 PM
With the tank off the plug cap coil overs wil come right off. Same setup on my GSX-R750 I had. Unplug the power leads and pull straight up.

suzukijo
12-18-2007, 06:53 PM
http://img179.imageshack.us/img179/6558/img2288xa3.jpg

planning on having low fuel in the tank, using a small block of wood under the back mount when unhooking wires and hoses, and knowing that to get the fuel line off you need to push in the blue tabs and wiggle them.

makes getting access to the spark plugs easy.

PhilS
12-18-2007, 09:59 PM
Actually I am looking forward to working on the bike this winter. For some strange reason I like taking it apart and putting it back together again. Thanks for the undertank photo.

Onward.....:rider:

treybrad
12-19-2007, 12:40 AM
http://img179.imageshack.us/img179/6558/img2288xa3.jpg

planning on having low fuel in the tank, using a small block of wood under the back mount when unhooking wires and hoses, and knowing that to get the fuel line off you need to push in the blue tabs and wiggle them.

makes getting access to the spark plugs easy.

For reference... I assume you can you unplug the power to the fuel pump (orange plug) and then start the bike like you would a car to depressurize the fuel system? I've had the tank off a couple times already, but each time I've disconnected the blue connector I've been greeted with a spritz of gas b/c I've failed to depressurize the fuel system... :giveup:

trey

suzukijo
12-19-2007, 12:48 AM
like you, i have learned by error, not to turn the key on with the fuel lines disconnected.
honestly, i havnt searched manual to find proper method of key on, with gastank removed.

treybrad
12-19-2007, 12:56 AM
like you, i have learned by error, not to turn the key on with the fuel lines disconnected.
honestly, i havnt searched manual to find proper method of key on, with gastank removed.

I'm talking about removing the lines even after the bike has been sitting. It seems to stay pressurized for quite a while... :eek2:

With my cars, the standard practice is to unplug the fuel pump (or remove the fuse), then start the car with the rest of the lines connected, until it dies of fuel starvation. The system is empty, and thus depressurized....

On the bike, for whatever reason (I'm usually too excited to install my newest farkle), I've failed to follow my own common sense, and as soon as I unplug the blue connector, I get a shirt full of gas... ugh.

trey

TWTourist
12-19-2007, 08:36 AM
Dumb question here. How do you remove the tank without lossing all of the gas. My bikes seem to break down just after I fill-up.:doh:

PhilS
12-19-2007, 11:06 AM
I believe since it's fuel injected and the pump is inside the tank, once you pull power off the pump, gas no longer comes out of the lines. SO it's all contained.

This is unlike carb'd bikes where it comes out of the open or leaky petcock valve, gets all over your garage floor, soaks into everything, catches the place on fire, spreads throughout the neighborhood, burns our crops, contamenates our water supply, and thus sends a plague unto our people.......or at least it's messy in some form!!

Sorry...:eek2:

TWTourist
12-19-2007, 12:11 PM
This is unlike carb'd bikes where it comes out of the open or leaky petcock valve, gets all over your garage floor, soaks into everything, catches the place on fire, spreads throughout the neighborhood, burns our crops, contamenates our water supply, and thus sends a plague unto our people.......or at least it's messy in some form!!

So, you were watching me when I removed the tank from my '03 Bandit.:doh: :rofl:

PhilS
12-31-2007, 03:50 PM
My oil inpsection window had this strange cloudy milky look to it today. Normally its clear or shows the oil of course. It's 40 degrees and sunny and I put about an hour or two of riding on it today. I put it on the center stand and started it and the moving oil and heat seemed to make it go away. Strange.

Anyone else seen this cloudy look before?

windman
12-31-2007, 04:28 PM
Dumb question here. How do you remove the tank without lossing all of the gas. My bikes seem to break down just after I fill-up.:doh:

If you disconnect the fuel line at the injector side( not the tank side) nothing will drip, the hose is a quick connect type.

terrebandit
12-31-2007, 06:31 PM
My oil inpsection window had this strange cloudy milky look to it today. Normally its clear or shows the oil of course. It's 40 degrees and sunny and I put about an hour or two of riding on it today. I put it on the center stand and started it and the moving oil and heat seemed to make it go away. Strange.

Anyone else seen this cloudy look before?

That's real common, especially in colder weather on a cold start-up. What you're seeing are minute air bubbles in the oil.

Dave

PhilS
12-31-2007, 07:17 PM
Thanks Dave - that confirms my thoughts and sets all at ease. I checked the coolant level and it was just under the "L" mark, but not by much and it's never been touched since purchased 3100 miles and 6 months ago. This is just 4 month old 2500 mile condensation in the oil.

Thanks

PhilS
01-27-2008, 09:48 PM
Suzuki Joe:

I am not normally one to rip into things without worrying, I mean, analyzing it prior......it's a fault, I know.

This is your picture. Can I correctly assume only the arrowed items used to be hooked to the vents that you plugged with something small like battery filling plugs? The rest of the stuff comes off not attached to anything - and - you left the wiring hooked up to the venting solenoid under the left fairing......all true?

http://i195.photobucket.com/albums/z62/stearnsp/can.jpg

suzukijo
01-27-2008, 10:18 PM
the 4 hoses connect to carb venturi to provide vacuum, those outlets need to be plugged. old battery vent caps (when you get a new batt) work well.

http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/7752/img0144ee2.jpg

http://img254.imageshack.us/img254/3734/img2281er1.jpg

the vent from the tank, i routed next to centerstand pivot. if i left the venting soldnoid unplugged FI warning stayed on, so i left it mounted (under left fairing panel) and plugged in, and capped it also. bugs have a habit of filling small holes with eggs, and i or the next owner, may someday want to use it again.

http://img352.imageshack.us/img352/566/img0146uu0.jpg

http://img176.imageshack.us/img176/6231/img2284vr3.jpg

the metal line was from the tank vent forward. the other drain off the tank is from the gas cap overflow area. keep it, and just run a tube from the tank vent, (which originally went to cannister) open to atmosphere, like so many previous bikes, venting near the stand pivot.

dwoodul
01-30-2008, 02:01 PM
I wanted to try putting this in the maintenance thread and see if I get any responses. Question: The wires for my Banditís (1250) FI and what-have-you seem to just ďhangĒ down under the tank and one set even rests against the left outside cylinder (I know, Iíll try to get some pictures next time itís uncovered). Is this normal? Iím going to gently tie-wrap the wires in as neat a bundle as possible. It just struck me as unusual to see as many loose/exposed wires down there. This is the first FI bike Iíve owned so maybe this is normal. Again Ė Iíll try for some pictures soon.

Thanks,

Ol Dave
07 Bandit (Black)

terrebandit
01-30-2008, 02:30 PM
It looks like some of you have learned how to take your gas tank off but have any of you tackled your first valve clearance adjustment? If so, how did it go? Did you have to pull the cams to make the adjust?

suzukijo
01-30-2008, 08:32 PM
with a shim under bucket architecture, as the '07 gsf bandit has, the cams do need to be removed to adj the valves, if they are out of spec. just take them out. shims are underneath.

the manual download is somewhere, windman found it. here you go.

http://www.snapdrive.net/files/486846/SuzukiGSF1250.zip

suzukijo
01-30-2008, 08:42 PM
The wires for my Bandit’s (1250) FI and what-have-you seem to just “hang” down under the tank and one set even rests against the left outside cylinder ......snip by suzukijo....

that bugged me too. i rerouted the wires, stock look below.

http://img163.imageshack.us/img163/4765/img2279dr9.jpg

rerouting and bending, changed it to this,

http://img441.imageshack.us/img441/2455/img2286nr1.jpg

to make it look like this,

http://img299.imageshack.us/img299/6695/img2293wt5.jpg

this was originally posted on www.riderforums.com
http://www.riderforums.com/showthread.php?t=27947&page=8
08/04/07

dwoodul
01-30-2008, 10:28 PM
Suzukijo,

Thanks - I didn't describe my "hanging wires" very well. Some actually hang below the carbs (FIs) so I'll do some re-routing this weekend. Yours look good, neat and organized.

Thanks,

Ol Dave

suzukijo
01-30-2008, 10:38 PM
did that too. sorry i dont have good picture of stock rats nest under Fi, stock here below.

http://img352.imageshack.us/img352/3317/img1352fg5.jpg

and after i put a rubber cover over one plug and hid the other behind it.

http://img352.imageshack.us/img352/9848/img0174bl1.jpg

similar angle as first, showing scratched left eng cover, and under Fi look.

http://img441.imageshack.us/img441/2831/img0176vr1.jpg

PhilS
02-17-2008, 01:15 PM
Does anyone know for sure the size of the rear wheel axel nut and the front drive sprocket nut? I know for sure that I do not have the rear nut socket, but am sure the front sprocket nut is something under 24mm - of which I have all.

I am standing in the garage pre-thinking my way through the 17tooth add-on later this week while cleaning my bike and would rather have the tools here ahead of time.

Thanks

treybrad
02-17-2008, 11:31 PM
Does anyone know for sure the size of the rear wheel axel nut and the front drive sprocket nut?

Rear axle is 36mm, I had to go buy a socket too... that thing is huge. There's a box wrench in your toolkit that fits, but it'll mar up the bolt using it because it's so thin... ask me how I know.

Counter shaft sprocket... no clue.

trey

Roy
02-18-2008, 06:40 AM
Counter shaft sprocket... no clue.

trey

32mm

PhilS
02-18-2008, 12:34 PM
Thanks Guys:

Rear Axel - 36MM
Front Sprocket - 32MM

Off to Autozone.....:rider:

Roy
02-18-2008, 12:38 PM
Thanks Guys:

Rear Axel - 36MM
Front Sprocket - 32MM

Off to Autozone.....:rider:

6 point sockets work best;-)

terrebandit
02-18-2008, 01:12 PM
36 mm...? definately overkill for that application. Good luck finding a socket of that size at Autozone.

Dave

Roy
02-18-2008, 01:30 PM
36 mm...? definately overkill for that application. Good luck finding a socket of that size at Autozone.

Dave

I agree, my '06 GSX-R1000 is a 36mm but I would gamble and say it needs it. :trust: The 1250 nut is a self locking design no more cotter pin to bust a finger on.:mrgreen:

I bought my 36mm at NAPA a long time ago. It's a 12 point socket which I do not really like but it does the job.

suzukijo
02-18-2008, 08:28 PM
36 mm...? definately overkill for that application. .....snip by suzukijo....

the nut size reflects the dia of the rear axle dia.
which fits the bearing sizes nicely.
a larger dia axle with a reduced thread size (24mm) is stronger lighter.
nut thickness is only 6mm. thread dia is reduced from axle dia.

http://img156.imageshack.us/img156/3618/img0306ml7.jpg

definately not overkill, imo. anything less would be less than sufficient.
if your comparing it to previous generation bandits, a nut that large would be overkill if used on the solid smaller dia axle, which fits inside the hole of the new bandits inside dia. (man, is my axle nut chewed up or what?)

PhilS
02-18-2008, 09:15 PM
36 mm...? definately overkill for that application. Good luck finding a socket of that size at Autozone.

Dave

Thanks for the "Good Luck" wish. Found them both at Advance Auto for $12 total for both. 36 and 32mm 6pt 1/2" drive. I needed this big one anyway as it is the size I need for the flywheel nut on the aircraft engine I am building....

Dale's 17 tooth will be here this week. As long as the snow goes away, I will install and report....for what it's worth.

rworm
02-18-2008, 10:04 PM
the nut size reflects the dia of the rear axle dia.
which fits the bearing sizes nicely.
a larger dia axle with a reduced thread size (24mm) is stronger lighter.
nut thickness is only 6mm. thread dia is reduced from axle dia.

http://img156.imageshack.us/img156/3618/img0306ml7.jpg

definately not overkill, imo. anything less would be less than sufficient.
if your comparing it to previous generation bandits, a nut that large would be overkill if used on the solid smaller dia axle, which fits inside the hole of the new bandits inside dia. (man, is my axle nut chewed up or what?)
Electrical tape;-) No socket marks/Any nut or bolt:rofl:


rworm

suzukijo
02-18-2008, 10:26 PM
Electrical tape;-) No socket marks/Any nut or bolt rworm
http://img104.imageshack.us/img104/7592/img0311yb5.jpg

i just had to go out to loosen and tighten it, again.
without break through, good tip.

http://img404.imageshack.us/img404/8181/img0312se5.jpg

rworm
02-18-2008, 10:37 PM
http://img104.imageshack.us/img104/7592/img0311yb5.jpg

i just had to go out to loosen and tighten it, again.
thanks for the tip. (you do taxes?)

Nope,but i do seamless gutters/
Nope,but i am a licensed elect/
Nope, but i am a fabricator/
Nope,Cousin is a CPA/Ya need a good CPA:lol2:

rworm

PhilS
02-20-2008, 12:34 PM
Questions concerning the front wheel removal and the maintenance manual:

1) The book says to remove the brake calipers before removing the front wheel. Do you guys do this? If not, why did the book say to do so?

2) The left side front axel has that inverted nut on it and the book says to buy the special hex nut tool - for $50 or so. :eek2: Do you guys have this or is there a way to hold the axel tight for removal and install to keep it steady?

Thanks - Phil

treybrad
02-20-2008, 12:46 PM
Questions concerning the front wheel removal and the maintenance manual:

1) The book says to remove the brake calipers before removing the front wheel. Do you guys do this? If not, why did the book say to do so?

2) The left side front axel has that inverted nut on it and the book says to buy the special hex nut tool - for $50 or so. :eek2: Do you guys have this or is there a way to hold the axel tight for removal and install to keep it steady?

Thanks - Phil

1) Yes, I had to remove the calipers. You won't be able to slide the edge of the wheel past the calipers w/o removing it...

2) Hmmm, no. I didn't have any special tool. Maybe I used something in the tool kit, I can't remember, but I didn't have to buy anything, just normal set of wrenches/sockets...

trey

MetrickMetal
02-20-2008, 12:58 PM
Questions concerning the front wheel removal and the maintenance manual:

1) The book says to remove the brake calipers before removing the front wheel. Do you guys do this? If not, why did the book say to do so?

2) The left side front axel has that inverted nut on it and the book says to buy the special hex nut tool - for $50 or so. :eek2: Do you guys have this or is there a way to hold the axel tight for removal and install to keep it steady?

Thanks - Phil

You need to remove the front calipers and tie them up out of the way before dropping the front wheel as it make first off it makes it much easier to remove the wheel, and secondly its almost impossible to try and install the front wheel while also trying to guide the brake disc's back in between the brake pads with the calipers attached, and you run the risk of damaging the the pads in the process.

The hex socket in the left side of the front axle takes is a 24mm hex and 24mm allen wrenchs which are available from places like McMaster Carr for around $18, or you can do like I did and purchase a M16 hex nut which is 24 mm across the flats and weld it to a piece of 1/4" x 1" x 10" steel bar and make a wrench to hold the axle while tightening up the axle nut.

I just removed my front wheel and forks,. and after removing the calipers, I tied them up with tie wraps and let them hang off of the bottom slots in my custom radiator grill which worked out quite nicely.

PhilS
02-20-2008, 01:02 PM
You need to remove the front calipers and tie them up out of the way before dropping the front wheel as it make first off it makes it much easier to remove the wheel, and secondly its almost impossible to try and install the front wheel while also trying to guide the brake disc's back in between the brake pads with the calipers attached, and you run the risk of damaging the the pads in the process.

The hex socket in the left side of the front axle takes is a 24mm hex and 24mm allen wrenchs which are available from places like McMaster Carr for around $18, or you can do like I did and purchase a M16 hex nut which is 24 mm across the flats and weld it to a piece of 1/4" x 1" x 10" steel bar and make a wrench to hold the axle while tightening up the axle nut.

24mm (M16) bolt, lockwashers, and 2 nuts all tightened together is the route to take.

Thanks for the advice guys.

MetrickMetal
02-20-2008, 01:07 PM
24mm (M16) bolt, lockwashers, and 2 nuts all tightened together is the route to take.

Thanks for the advice guys.

I assume that you are going to lock the two nut together so that you can slip a 24mm box end wrench over them to allow you told keer the head of the bolt from turning, but whats the lockwasher for?

PhilS
02-20-2008, 01:11 PM
Locking the nuts together - perhaps not needed. I'm just thinking "out loud" at this point...........I usually push paper for a living!!!:doh:

MetrickMetal
02-20-2008, 01:18 PM
Locking the nuts together - perhaps not needed. I'm just thinking "out loud" at this point...........I usually push paper for a living!!!:doh:

With the two nut locked tightly together and the fact that there is actually not that much torque that the are going to see when tightening the axle nut, as once the axle shoulders on the bearings and spacers, it really doesn't take much forch to keep the axle from turning until is tight, so yes, its not really needed.

PhilS
05-03-2008, 04:16 PM
Good afternoon (although it's raining here in Ohio......)

I did my 4000 mile service today - 11 months after purchase.

Here are the highlights:

Oil - Shell Rotella 5W-40 Full Synthetic
Oil Treatment - 6oz XR-1
Oil Filter - K&N 138
Air Filter - K&N SU-6000
Spark Plugs - NGK CR-7E 4578 Standard
Removed Fuel Vent Cannsiter System - For Track Purposes only

1) Oil Drain plug had very little metal flake on it. Could have been
left over from 1st service done by shop.

2) Used foil over pipes. Served as a nice drain path for the filter.

http://i195.photobucket.com/albums/z62/stearnsp/4000MileServiceOilDrainFoil.jpg

3) Filter tightend from the right side of the bike but exits
from the left.

http://i195.photobucket.com/albums/z62/stearnsp/4000MileServiceOilFilterFit.jpg

4) Cannister system came right off. Re-routed vent down rear
of engine like the other vent hoses. The plugs used are #10 screw
covers purchased as Lowes. Screw Driver is pointing to it.

http://i195.photobucket.com/albums/z62/stearnsp/4000MileServiceFuelPlugs.jpg

5) Service manual said to inspect plugs. Well, if I am going to
inspect them, they are getting replaced. Here they are #1 to #4
left to right. Bottom of electrode showed no overheating issues.
Replacing these is a ****!!! The middle two are OK, with #2 requiring
the coolant bracket to be lossened, but #1 and #4 require some
lossening of the fairing and some slight of hand with universal socket joints and such. I als used some 3/8" rubber fuel hose to reach down
and grab the plugs and re-insert them. Overall, they look good.

http://i195.photobucket.com/albums/z62/stearnsp/4000MileServiceAllPlugs.jpg

Now when it quits raining, I will go enjoy the fruits of my labor.

Phil

treybrad
05-03-2008, 05:11 PM
Removed Fuel Vent Cannsiter System - For Track Purposes only

Hey Phil, are you expecting any benefit of removing the cannister and hoses? I've thought about taking mine off, just to clean things up a bit down there, but don't know if there are any up/down sides to doing so.

trey

PhilS
05-03-2008, 05:46 PM
Hey Phil, are you expecting any benefit of removing the cannister and hoses? I've thought about taking mine off, just to clean things up a bit down there, but don't know if there are any up/down sides to doing so.

trey

Easy to do, no benefit at all other than cleaning it up at the engine and under the fairing. It was just something to do while doing everything else. If I was looking for weight loss on the bike, I'd go on a diet first!!!:eek2:

A1A
05-05-2008, 12:26 PM
It will soon be time for me to do an oil & filter change. The Bandit is definitely a lot tighter to work on compared to any V-Twin engine I ever owned. The oil filter replacement looks like it could really be a messy task. In the past with the V-Twins I'd do an oil & filter change in the garage. But with the inline four engine, I think I'll change the oil & filter in the street. I sure wouldn't want an oiley mess all over the garage floor.
Thanks Phil for the photos and sharing your oil change information. If anyone else would care to post any ideas or photos regarding oil/oil filter changing tips for the Bandit, I'll be all ears and eyes.

:popcorn:

Huladog
05-05-2008, 02:43 PM
It will soon be time for me to do an oil & filter change. The Bandit is definitely a lot tighter to work on compared to any V-Twin engine I ever owned.
:popcorn:

You got that right! Working my previous Softail Deluxe was easy compared to the Bandit since most stuff was right out in the open.

Tips for the oil change? You've seen the one about using foil on your headers to funnel the oil dripping out of the filter when you remove it. Another? BE SURE YOU HAVE A FILTER WRENCH THAT FITS BEFORE YOU BEGIN because there is little room to spare around that cannister. Loosen from the right side, slide the filter out the left side, you will have to move the coolant hose a bit to get the filter out but it WILL slide out.

Easy to drain the oil while on the side stand since the drain plug is on the left (lower) side. When tightening the drain plug DON'T gorilla it tight!

Aloha,
Huladog

A1A
05-05-2008, 03:31 PM
You got that right! Working my previous Softail Deluxe was easy compared to the Bandit since most stuff was right out in the open.

Tips for the oil change? You've seen the one about using foil on your headers to funnel the oil dripping out of the filter when you remove it. Another? BE SURE YOU HAVE A FILTER WRENCH THAT FITS BEFORE YOU BEGIN because there is little room to spare around that cannister. Loosen from the right side, slide the filter out the left side, you will have to move the coolant hose a bit to get the filter out but it WILL slide out.

Easy to drain the oil while on the side stand since the drain plug is on the left (lower) side. When tightening the drain plug DON'T gorilla it tight!

Aloha,
Huladog

Thanks Huladog,
To be honest the foil over the header pipes is my only real worry. Looks like it will be really messy even using the tin foil.

Cheers! :chug:

whitesands
05-05-2008, 05:47 PM
Oil changes are a breeze on the bandit....Not messy at all...It just drips on the foil and then into the oil pan..One trick is to fold the foil a few times to make it thicker so you can have a smoother surface then just lay it under the filter and form a canal with the foil and angle the end of it towards the drain pan.

Roy
05-05-2008, 07:58 PM
I did my plugs and air filter a few weeks ago, a pain in the butt for both!! I don't look forward to a valve check at 14,500. That is one crammed space under the tank. Way too many rubber hoses.

I think my bike needs a throttle body sync and I am hating this new setup with no adjustable idle and being a slave to some Suzuki software that I don't have. I have a noticeable high frequency vibration in hte bars at 3500 rpm's that I do think is a sync issue. Other than the vibes there the bike runs great. If this was a conventional motorcyle I could check it tonight and report my finidings but I don't have the SDS software to correctly adjust the idle during the procedure. Blows!!

suzukijo
05-05-2008, 11:40 PM
It will soon be time for me to do an oil & filter change. The Bandit is definitely a lot tighter to work on compared to any V-Twin engine I ever owned. The oil filter replacement looks like it could really be a messy task. In the past with the V-Twins I'd do an oil & filter change in the garage. But with the inline four engine, I think I'll change the oil & filter in the street. I sure wouldn't want an oiley mess all over the garage floor.
Thanks Phil for the photos and sharing your oil change information. If anyone else would care to post any ideas or photos regarding oil/oil filter changing tips for the Bandit, I'll be all ears and eyes.

:popcorn:

with al foil over the headpipes, and using a drain pan, there should be no mess besides the foil in the trash, and the old oil back in the plastic jug the new oil came in, brought to the recycle location. the drain plug exits straight down, and there is little mess from the filter, but the foil makes it simple.

if you dont have the correct size filter wrench, you can tighten a automotive style hose clamp around it and tapping the head, from the side you can loosen unscrew the filter.
repositioning the clamp, as it unscrews, you can unscrew it fully, and if your careful, simply drain and reuse the filter if you like, tightening a new one by hand is tight enough.

having the wrench, from suzuki about $8, is cheap, and most dealers have one in stock.

PhilS
05-06-2008, 11:14 AM
having the wrench, from suzuki about $8, is cheap, and most dealers have one in stock.

Or for next time, use the K&N 138 which has the 17mm nut already on it and problem is solved.

A1A
05-06-2008, 11:25 AM
Thanks Suzukijo,

I have all the correct Suzuki oil filter changing gear. So thanks again, "oh" the large clamp and tapping is a new one for me. I'm glad I asked the question about filter and oil change.

Cheers!

Lost Yankee
05-06-2008, 12:29 PM
K&N: A physician once told me: "I don't put used oil filters in my car, and I don't eat liver."

Phil, is the K/N a single-use item, or what's involved in cleaning the K&N?

PhilS
05-06-2008, 02:12 PM
K&N: A physician once told me: "I don't put used oil filters in my car, and I don't eat liver."

Phil, is the K/N a single-use item, or what's involved in cleaning the K&N?

Misundertood.........

K&N oil filter has nut welded on it so it's easy to take off and put on and there is no need for the Oil Filter Wrench discussed below. The emails prior were talking about wrenches adn hose clamps for easy removal.

Of course, no one in there right mind would use a used oil filter.

Now, the K&N Air Filter is another story.....

Phil

suzukijo
05-08-2008, 09:17 PM
Of course, no one in there right mind would use a used oil filter.....snip by suzukijo.... Phil

well, actually i use a used oil filter a lot? every time i start my bike a different day, i am using the 'old' filter.
and i think its prudent to follow the suggested maintenance schedule from suzuki and it doesnt say to replace filter every time.

the only problem with not changing the filter at an oil change, is the small contamination of the fresh oil, by the old oil in the filter. which can be drained if you unscrew it, drain it, and reinstall it.

to think there is no contamination of new oil with old oil, by replacing the filter with a new one is not understanding where oil is located in your engine and how it is pumped thru it.

i would assume the argument that 'you gotta put a new filter with new oil' makes sense to most people, but it needs to be explained to me, to make any sense.

of course, i would agree, there is nothing wrong with putting new parts,oil, oil filters, chain, sprockets, tires, bake pads, brake rotors, clutch plates, etc.

but replacing them unecessarily at an earlier than suggested interval makes no sense to me (or my wallet).

but for sake of argument, tell me your side of the 'you gotta put a new filter everytime you change the oil', and i will in kind answer with my understanding.

(i'm looking forward to peeking in the clutch basket to see how things are going in there, since i slip the clutch so much)

and with the new front tire just around the corner, i noticed my rear brake pads are near wear limits, this is my second set of rear pads.
i like to think i am pretty tough on my stuff, and oil changes, tires, chains, brake pads, cost enough already. i am still on my original air filter, and know it probably needs replacing soon also.

i know oil filters are only $10.
but lets get your opinion about why it needs to be replaced.
or does it? (no one thinks i am in my right mind anyway)

Dink.1170
05-09-2008, 05:20 AM
I work in the Auto industry, I am yet to see an engine die from over servicing, certainly have seen way to many from under-servicing.
As far as I am concerned whether you change oil & filter as a set is entirely up to you. I choose too, I DO NOT ram my choices down anyones neck.

Dink

Roy
05-09-2008, 06:51 AM
I don't change my oil filter every oil change and I have been doing htis for years now with no problems what so ever. I never let a filter go over the 11k recommended interval. I only use Suzuki 10w40 which I can get locally for $2.79 a qt. I use it in all my bikes. I usually go 3k miles on the 1250 oil then change it. I change the 1000 oil when ever I go to the track. I change the 450 every two rides, it only olds a little ove a quart.:mrgreen:

We think alot alike jo;-)

PhilS
05-09-2008, 10:32 AM
Sorry guys. I did not mean to offend, I was just being goofy with my response. I personally like over-servicing the bike as I like messing with it. My thought on the filter was simply one about filtering good clean oil through a dirty filter. Whether this is an issue or not, I don't know. You engine experts would know that. For me, it's cheap, gives me more to do on the bike, and probably the biggest thing........it's makes me feel better.:zen:

That's all........I'll tone it down a bit.

Onward!

whitesands
05-09-2008, 01:53 PM
If I'm doing short oil change intervals I'll change the filter every other oil change..But I wouldn't go anywhere near the manual suggestions of over 10,000 miles...

Personally, I like to change the oil every 1,000 miles when using conventional oil.....I'll change the filter every other oil change...The interval is so short that there is no good reason to change the filter.....The old oil that's left in with the filter which is only a few ounces spends a maximum of 2000 miles in there and the filter has a total of 2000 miles.....If I were doing 2000 mile intervals I still might change the oil filter every other change as thats only 4,000 miles on an oil filter which is no problem.

In reality the filter is quite sturdy and can take much more than that but that's all I'm comfotable with.

Lost Yankee
05-09-2008, 02:08 PM
If the engine was air-cooled, I could justify 3k change intervals. But it's liquid cooled, it burns 87 octane (lower exhaust temps), aluminum head/block with oil/liquid intercooler (transfers heat), so for street-duty, 5k is fine. 10k with Mob1 is no problem.

A more likely reason for early changes is if it has water / condensation in it from not getting hot enough.

A filter is either flowing, or it's plugged (or on bypass). 10k on throw-away filter should be fine, if it's a decent quality one. Do a search for fram vs. wix if you aren't familiar with that debate.

suzukijo
05-10-2008, 12:34 PM
in an effort to keep this a maintenance thread, if you would like to join in on the oil thread, go here. informative link to oil filters, and how they work.

http://www.twtex.com/forums/showthread.php?t=27754

PhilS
05-11-2008, 10:05 PM
Cleaning is kinda like maintenance..........

What do you guys use to keep the rear wheel clean from chain lube and street crap? I've been using PJ1 Super Cleaner (basically brake cleaner). I use it every ride and keep her looking new. I've also heard of Bike Brite but I hear you don't want to let it dry on you.

Thoughts?

whitesands
05-12-2008, 01:44 AM
Honda spray polish or plexus works very well...The grease from the chain that flings on the swingarm and wheel comes right off with it...And it leaves a protective barrier from water and dust..It's really good stuff to use after washing your bike as it's almost like a spray on wax too....If you use it after washing, the next time you wash your bike you'll notice water will bead up like you waxed it everywhere you use it...

If you've ever had a two stroke mx bike you'll notice that oil spots will get on the rear fender and side number plate and is hard to get off...Honda spray polish or plexus will take it off with ease...And it protects the plastic too.

Out of all the stuff I've used over the years both plexus and Honda spray polish are the best and they actually work....

suzukijo
05-12-2008, 08:29 PM
What do you guys use to keep the rear wheel clean from chain lube and street crap? Thoughts?

i'd switch to a telfon based chain lube. (walmart, lowes)
i did, and i just use a soft cloth to wipe the dust off the inside of the wheels.

PhilS
05-13-2008, 10:16 PM
What do you guys use to keep the rear wheel clean from chain lube and street crap?

Holy cow, I'm quoting myself!!! How egotistical of me!!!

Actually, I wanted to let you know where this following comment came from. I took my rear wheel off tonight in preparation for the new warranty Storm going on in a day or two. Well, all that chain grease and street dirt was all over the back wheel on the hub area that I never really clean kinda drive me crazy. I was reading on the Honda Spray Wash and Polish can that it removes grease too. MAN!!!! What a nice job. and it left a nice polish base for simple cleaning next time. The grease and grime came right off. This black wheel looks factory perfect again. If it were only RED it would even be faster!! I really like this stuff.

Phil

Herb2E
06-02-2008, 02:32 AM
With the tank off the plug cap coil overs wil come right off. Same setup on my GSX-R750 I had. Unplug the power leads and pull straight up.

The frame itself blocks the plug caps on the first and fourth cylinders - can the coils be bent? or am I missing something? :giveup:

Roy
06-02-2008, 07:12 AM
The frame itself blocks the plug caps on the first and fourth cylinders - can the coils be bent? or am I missing something? :giveup:

Spin them around so the elbow part faces you then pull them straight up.

MetrickMetal
07-01-2008, 03:20 PM
I changed my oil and filter today at 12,000 miles as well as installing a new K&N air filter plus I installed the set of PAIR valve blockoff plates I machined up which fit just perfectly, just I designed them and I also pulled off all the PAIR system components as well.

I also pulled the plugs and looked at them, but they still look great and the gap was withing spec, so they will stay in at least until 14,500 miles when I do the valve adjustment. :rider:

etcthorne
07-01-2008, 06:00 PM
Phil, I use Pledge furniture polish on my bikes. I've been doing this for years. Dirt doesn't stick to it, it removes grease like it's a solvent, and it's cheap. Agree with Joe about switching to Teflon chain lubricant. I bought the stuff about 1000 miles ago and will never switch back to anything else.

AXEL
07-01-2008, 10:37 PM
I changed my oil and filter today at 12,000 miles as well as installing a new K&N air filter plus I installed the set of PAIR valve blockoff plates I machined up which fit just perfectly, just I designed them and I also pulled off all the PAIR system components as well.

I also pulled the plugs and looked at them, but they still look great and the gap was withing spec, so they will stay in at least until 14,500 miles when I do the valve adjustment. :rider:

Have any trouble with the FI light coming on after disconnecting pair solenoid?

MetrickMetal
07-02-2008, 12:45 AM
Have any trouble with the FI light coming on after disconnecting pair solenoid?

Yes, the FI light does come on if the PAIR solenoid is disconnected, so I covered up all the ports on the solenoid with plastics caps and connected the solenoid back up and tie wrapped it to the frame cross member under the tank right above the throttle bodies.

PhilS
07-03-2008, 05:51 PM
Bottom line thinking here please.........but what exactly does one get for blocking off and removing the PAIR system? (for off-road track purposes only of course)

AXEL
07-05-2008, 08:24 PM
Much easier to remove the cam cover for valve adjustment. Solenoid and stock PAIR covers have too be removed first to gain clearance. Cover screws are locktighted and very difficult to get to.

PhilS
07-05-2008, 10:56 PM
What about operational/performance differences?

AXEL
07-07-2008, 04:57 PM
As far as I know it's the same as plugging the hose. No popping on deceleration with modified exhaust.

PhilS
07-07-2008, 07:49 PM
As far as I know it's the same as plugging the hose. No popping on deceleration with modified exhaust.


So......seems to me if that's the case, plugging the hose is a heck of a lot easier for the same results. True? But, it's also maybe like the fuel cannister that magically fell off "for track purposes only", I simply did not want it there anymore.

Brass
07-07-2008, 09:11 PM
So......seems to me if that's the case, plugging the hose is a heck of a lot easier for the same results. True? But, it's also maybe like the fuel cannister that magically fell off "for track purposes only", I simply did not want it there anymore.

Ok, I'll bite. How big and where is this canister located?? I have a Canadian spec bike and haven't found a canister yet. It's possible bikes up here don't have them but in case they do, where should I be looking for it?

PhilS
07-07-2008, 09:32 PM
Ok, I'll bite. How big and where is this canister located?? I have a Canadian spec bike and haven't found a canister yet. It's possible bikes up here don't have them but in case they do, where should I be looking for it?

Under front fairing right inside. Also solenoid for cannister is under front fairing left. You Canadian types may not have to have them.

Brass
07-08-2008, 09:48 AM
I've poked around in there a good bit when mounting the ballasts for the HID lights and never found a cannister. Suzuki must have saved me the trouble of removing it.

PhilS
07-08-2008, 10:06 AM
I've poked around in there a good bit when mounting the ballasts for the HID lights and never found a cannister. Suzuki must have saved me the trouble of removing it.

Or....your Government saved you the trouble of owning it!!!! :lol2:

marylynn
07-11-2008, 01:08 AM
My owner manuel sad to change spark plugs at 7500 miles, I thought that was early, but changed them around 9200miles, #3 had some rust on the washer other than that they all looked new. Why you suppose they have you change them so early?
ML

Its good to pull the tank. Removing a tank on a MC is a basic/necessary step for many important maintenance-related tasks so its good to get familiar with the procedure anyway.

I always remove the tank before pulling the plugs on Bandits. Its easy to get dirt, debris, corosion (rust particles), etc down in those deep spark plug wells next to the plugs. If you remove the tank, you can use your ShopVac to suck out any debris that might have accumulated in there before removing the plugs. If you don't do this, you run the risk of that stuff falling into the combustion chamber which is not good. The last time I changed plugs in mine, I actually had a spark plug compression ring come off an old plug (stupid autolite plugs - never again!) while removing it from the head. Having the tank off the bike allowed me to fish that sucker out of there before installing the new plug.

As for tools?? I just you a 19mm SPARKPLUG socket (the one with the rubber insert) with an 3" extension and rachet to do the job. Go down to Sears and get one. I use the tool kit under the seat for emergencies only, while on the road.[/QUOTE]

whitesands
07-13-2008, 01:38 AM
That does seem kind of early...It seems like spark plugs can go much longer than that, but at least you know your getting a good spark with new ones...Concerning the rust, is your bike exposed to very much water ?

Thanks for the info.

marylynn
07-13-2008, 10:29 AM
I live in the northwest but have managed to only get wet once while riding. Only once have I rode home and the rain, other times rain just begining more of a mist. I did wash bike with the hose once or twice being mindful of not just blasting the engine with water. Now I just use a good spray cleaner to get the bugs and dirt off. Actually, I think a bit of water got in there when I drove home in the heavy rain as exposure was a got hour plus that day from the ferry.

Nah, only one spark plug had rust on the O ring, not bad. We should all keep in mind if we let the bike sit after a wash or a short ride to the store if water gets in there get it in a dry place and let the engine run for a bit to keep water out of those deep socket wells.

I think I will replace the spark plugs every 10K weather I needs its it or not.

Have you had the joy of getting the two bottom screws out (the two bottom screw are hard the top two a piece of cake) to check the air filter yet?
ML

That does seem kind of early...It seems like spark plugs can go much longer than that, but at least you know your getting a good spark with new ones...Concerning the rust, is your bike exposed to very much water ?

Thanks for the info.

MetrickMetal
07-13-2008, 11:36 AM
I live in the northwest but have managed to only get wet once while riding. Only once have I rode home and the rain, other times rain just begining more of a mist. I did wash bike with the hose once or twice being mindful of not just blasting the engine with water. Now I just use a good spray cleaner to get the bugs and dirt off. Actually, I think a bit of water got in there when I drove home in the heavy rain as exposure was a got hour plus that day from the ferry.

Nah, only one spark plug had rust on the O ring, not bad. We should all keep in mind if we let the bike sit after a wash or a short ride to the store if water gets in there get it in a dry place and let the engine run for a bit to keep water out of those deep socket wells.

I think I will replace the spark plugs every 10K weather I needs its it or not.

Have you had the joy of getting the two bottom screws out (the two bottom screw are hard the top two a piece of cake) to check the air filter yet?
ML

You do not need to completely remove the two lower air cleaner cover screws to remove the filter, just remove the top screws and loosen the bottom ones enough to allow the cover to be swung out far enough so that you can remove the filter.

I found out the first time I completely removed the two lower cover screws, that they can be a real pain in the *** trying to get them started into the nut plates again, so thats when I found out its better to just loosen them enough to get the filter out.

I think I turn the lower screws about 4 full turns loose which allows the cover to move out far enough. :rider:

marylynn
07-13-2008, 05:16 PM
Hey there thanks for the tip, I will try this right after we come back from Yellow Stone. I will have probably over the 12K miles and check it out and see if it really needs to be replaced. I suspect it will be fine, my husbands Goldwing air filter looked really clean even after 20K miles. Well enjoy your summer riding all that you can.
MLYou do not need to completely remove the two lower air cleaner cover screws to remove the filter, just remove the top screws and loosen the bottom ones enough to allow the cover to be swung out far enough so that you can remove the filter.

I found out the first time I completely removed the two lower cover screws, that they can be a real pain in the *** trying to get them started into the nut plates again, so thats when I found out its better to just loosen them enough to get the filter out.

I think I turn the lower screws about 4 full turns loose which allows the cover to move out far enough. :rider:

A1A
07-27-2008, 09:38 PM
Hi Folks,

Just curious on the procedure for removing the 1250 fuel tank. Looking at pictures I believe I understand the hoses and fuel pump electrical plug removel sequence. But I'm confused where you uncouple the fuel hose. Is it at the fuel tank or further down toward the engine? Also is there any other surprises concerning the fuel tank removal?

Thanks in advance!

MetrickMetal
07-27-2008, 10:55 PM
Hi Folks,

Just curious on the procedure for removing the 1250 fuel tank. Looking at pictures I believe I understand the hoses and fuel pump electrical plug removel sequence. But I'm confused where you uncouple the fuel hose. Is it at the fuel tank or further down toward the engine? Also is there any other surprises concerning the fuel tank removal?

Thanks in advance!

The fuel tank comes off easy and there are two quick disconnects on the fuel line, one right where it attaches to the tank, and the other down where it attaches to the fule rail.

I always remove the connection at the fuel tank, and all you do to disconnect it is push the two light blue buttons in on each side of the connector, then pull on it.

Then all you have to do is disconnect the vent line and the electrical connector and it comes right off. It also much easier to remoce if the tank is close to being empty also.

A1A
07-28-2008, 11:52 AM
Thanks Bandito for your quick response to my fuel tank removal question. I have one more question concerning sparkplug removal.
The owners manual states to release the connector locks and disconnect the connectors from the ignition coils. Than pull off the ignition coils.

Ok, so how are connector locks released and disconnected from the ignition coils?

Thanks again in advance!

marylynn
07-29-2008, 12:55 PM
Sorry for the delay have been enjoying the riding this summer.
You asked about the fuel tank removal:
First remove the two bolts in front of the seat, Put a rag in front of the fuel feed hose then don't leave it on the fuel pump side. The two hoses towards the front of the bike are breather hose and drain hose, disconnect these two. disconnect the fuel pump coupler then remove tank. Hope this helps!
Hi Folks,

Just curious on the procedure for removing the 1250 fuel tank. Looking at pictures I believe I understand the hoses and fuel pump electrical plug removel sequence. But I'm confused where you uncouple the fuel hose. Is it at the fuel tank or further down toward the engine? Also is there any other surprises concerning the fuel tank removal?

Thanks in advance!

A1A
07-29-2008, 01:45 PM
Thanks marylynn for the fuel tank removal information.

Question regarding sparkplug removal.

My Owners Manual states to release the connector locks and disconnect the connectors from the ignition coils. Then pull off the ignition coils.

Ok, so how are the connector locks released and disconnected from the ignition coils? Do you just pull them off or do you also have to push some release device as your pulling them off the ignition coils?

Thanks in advance!

marylynn
07-29-2008, 02:46 PM
I disconnected the lead wire couplers from the ignition coil/plug caps. The ignition coils pull straight up, the book recommends you do not use a screw driver to pry up. Then had to "mickey mouse" 3/8" couplers end to end to get the spark plug out. It took a few times to figure out which couplers to use. If one of the coupler connection pulls away while your pulling the assembly out you got to start all over.
Or you can spend money to buy the right tool for the job #09930-10121 spark plug removal wrench set from Suzuki. You will have to order it and wait for it to come in.
BTW after 9200 miles the spark plugs still look brand new! Hope this helps ya!
Thanks marylynn for the fuel tank removal information.

Question regarding sparkplug removal.

My Owners Manual states to release the connector locks and disconnect the connectors from the ignition coils. Then pull off the ignition coils.

Ok, so how are the connector locks released and disconnected from the ignition coils? Do you just pull them off or do you also have to push some release device as your pulling them off the ignition coils?

Thanks in advance!

A1A
07-29-2008, 11:53 PM
I disconnected the lead wire couplers from the ignition coil/plug caps. The ignition coils pull straight up, the book recommends you do not use a screw driver to pry up. Then had to "mickey mouse" 3/8" couplers end to end to get the spark plug out. It took a few times to figure out which couplers to use. If one of the coupler connection pulls away while your pulling the assembly out you got to start all over.
Or you can spend money to buy the right tool for the job #09930-10121 spark plug removal wrench set from Suzuki. You will have to order it and wait for it to come in.
BTW after 9200 miles the spark plugs still look brand new! Hope this helps ya!

Thanks for the info! I only have about 6000 miles on the bike. So wasn't really planning to check the sparkplugs for a while yet. I was only getting the info to do the job in the future.

Thanks again!

marylynn
07-30-2008, 11:22 AM
Ya, my husband and his friend who are long time riders thought this was a bit early but we changed the plug anyways, because the good ol book said to. I believe this was a waste of money and time. I will replace the air filter before we go to Yellow Stone on Saturday but if I have to order it I am not going to sweat it.
Your very welcome enjoy your bike!
MLThanks for the info! I only have about 6000 miles on the bike. So wasn't really planning to check the sparkplugs for a while yet. I was only getting the info to do the job in the future.

Thanks again!

funkemaster
08-01-2008, 10:51 AM
Ya, my husband and his friend who are long time riders thought this was a bit early but we changed the plug anyways, because the good ol book said to. I believe this was a waste of money and time. I will replace the air filter before we go to Yellow Stone on Saturday but if I have to order it I am not going to sweat it.
Your very welcome enjoy your bike!
ML

Yellowstone is an awsome ride.:-P It's weird passing buffalo when your on a bike. It kinda creeps me out due to their size. Awsome ride though. The wife and I are planning it for next month.

whitesands
08-03-2008, 03:28 PM
Sounds like it's going to be an awesome ride!

PhilS
08-04-2008, 05:19 PM
Once I get to adjusting valves, I will be pulling the PAIR system as well. Does anyone know if someone makes a PAIR blocking kit out there? I've seen them for other bikes and am now searching for the 1250.

Post if ya know of kit or a place to buy these things....

whitesands
08-04-2008, 10:57 PM
The original Honda spray polish is back under a new name.

http://www.motorcycledaily.com/30july08_bikespirits.htm

PhilS
10-12-2008, 07:38 AM
Anyone got an easy way to drain a little oil from the motor? I changed oil this weekend and over filled it - as in the oil level above "F" could not be seen so I had no idea just how over full it was. I ended up removing the main drain very slowly but when it finally started coming out, it came out in a big rush...............it was quite messy.

Any easy way to do this?

twist
10-12-2008, 09:09 AM
Take it up in your airplane, take of the oil filler cap, and do an aileron roll (or two) :pilot: Oh, I guess that wouldn't work, the g-forces would keep it in (sounds fun anyway).

Chinamart (Harbor Freight), and many other places sell cheap siphons that might work. Maybe just a long plastic tube from Home Depot and some suction could get it out (a big syringe, or by mouth).

I wouldn't even try it from the drain plug, I'm know I'd drop it and lose all the oil...

A1A
10-12-2008, 10:02 AM
Once I get to adjusting valves, I will be pulling the PAIR system as well. Does anyone know if someone makes a PAIR blocking kit out there? I've seen them for other bikes and am now searching for the 1250.

Post if ya know of kit or a place to buy these things....

Phil,
I think El Bandito (Scott) from this site has made Pair Valve blocking plates for his bike. I'm not sure if he will be taking any orders though.

Dmaxhall
12-29-2008, 02:43 AM
Anyone got an easy way to drain a little oil from the motor? I changed oil this weekend and over filled it - as in the oil level above "F" could not be seen so I had no idea just how over full it was. I ended up removing the main drain very slowly but when it finally started coming out, it came out in a big rush...............it was quite messy.

Any easy way to do this?

Get yourself a syringe (a big one) from the chemist (drug store?) put a piece of plastic tube of the correct size on the nipple and suck it out (via the filler cap hole). Repeat until down to the required level.

(The Fork Oil Level Tool is just the same...)

PhilS
12-29-2008, 11:09 PM
Phil,
I think El Bandito (Scott) from this site has made Pair Valve blocking plates for his bike. I'm not sure if he will be taking any orders though.

I got a set from El Bandito - fantastic machinery.

windman
12-31-2008, 12:00 AM
Once I get to adjusting valves, I will be pulling the PAIR system as well. Does anyone know if someone makes a PAIR blocking kit out there? I've seen them for other bikes and am now searching for the 1250.

Post if ya know of kit or a place to buy these things....

Just bought thoses

Click HERE (http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/TPO-Suzuki-GSF1250-Bandit-1250-Emissions-Removal-Kit_W0QQcmdZViewItemQQ_trkparmsZ72Q3a1234Q7c66Q3a4 Q7c65Q3a12Q7c39Q3a2Q7c240Q3a1318QQ_trksidZp3286Q2e c0Q2em14QQhashZitem300283936035QQitemZ300283936035 QQptZMotorcyclesQ5fPartsQ5fAccessories)

sproggy
12-31-2008, 03:18 AM
Just bought thoses

Click HERE (http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/TPO-Suzuki-GSF1250-Bandit-1250-Emissions-Removal-Kit_W0QQcmdZViewItemQQ_trkparmsZ72Q3a1234Q7c66Q3a4 Q7c65Q3a12Q7c39Q3a2Q7c240Q3a1318QQ_trksidZp3286Q2e c0Q2em14QQhashZitem300283936035QQitemZ300283936035 QQptZMotorcyclesQ5fPartsQ5fAccessories)

:thumb: Thanks for the link - I've just bought a set too. :chug:

windman
12-31-2008, 09:09 AM
Since the link are not available as soon as somebody buy it, just seach for bandit 1250 on ebay and you will find it

The seller is: tpo_parts (http://myworld.ebay.com/ebaymotors/tpo_parts/)

Here's his store: tpo_parts's store (http://motors.shop.ebay.com/merchant/tpo_parts)

MetrickMetal
12-31-2008, 09:13 AM
You'll also find these when you search for Bandit 1250, and these are the ones I recommend. :trust:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&ssPageName=STRK:MESELX:IT&item=180317100808

Ero
05-06-2009, 04:21 PM
****

I was wondering if anyone has a working link to an online manual for the GSF1250? The one above is expired.

thunderbolt
05-06-2009, 07:49 PM
I was wondering if anyone has a working link to an online manual for the GSF1250? The one above is expired.

Such things are frowned upon here. Just order the official Suzuki manual, it's pretty affordable:thumb:

GregH
05-06-2009, 09:25 PM
I was wondering if anyone has a working link to an online manual for the GSF1250? The one above is expired.

Sorry, Ero. We don't allow posting links to copyrighted material. It's theft and it endangers TWTex. Boards have been sued, and closed, for providing links to pirated material.

Buy a manual. You can find them on eBay for a very reasonable price.

achesley
06-14-2009, 10:20 AM
Well well well. Coming in from a little 270 mile jaunt about SW Louisiana and SE Texas, I decided to see what my total miles were in the bike. 13,880. Wow! I always keep it in the trip mode so don't really notice the miles piling up. That met 13,880 on the plugs and air filter. And about 3500 on the oil and filter. So, ordered an air filter and spark plugs from Bike Bandit and had them at my door step in 3 days. Love that service. ;-).
Yesterday afternoon, after it cooled down a little, I put the Bandit on the lift in the shop, put tie downs on it just in case, Pulled the seat off ( simple job ;-) ) Pulled the tank off ( little harder due to first time taking it off and figuring out what all needed to come apart ) Changed the air filter ( really not needed as my old one was in great shape and just barely tannish in color But, since your there , change it ) . Two front screws on the box = easy . Second two in back = Wow. Unscrewed them but didn't take them out of the cover. Pryed the cover back and swapped them out. No problem getting all back together. Acutally easier air filter change than my last BMW's or DL1000.
Took a look at what I was going to have to do to get to the sparking plugs. Geesh. What a mess. Told the dog, we need to go print some pages out of the manual on the desktop puter and do this early in the cool of the morning. ;-).

Up at a fisty 3:30AM , made coffee, ate a banana, mess around in the office. 6:30AM rolls about and I'm out the door to the shop. About 30 steps due south of the back door. ;-). Rig up a light right over the bike on the roof of the shop. Now can see all that hidden stuff better.
Make sure all the new plugs are gapped right at .028, which they were.
#1 Hmmmmmm . Figured out the connector and got it off. Like that type of connector and wish more were like that. Used my middle channel lock pliers and worke the coil / plug cap back and forth while pulling up. Popped up pretty easy. Geesh! How do I get it off now. Keeps hitting the frame. Hmmmm. Rotate the top and it barely gets by on the outside. Yeah! Success!
Now, where in my took kit? Oh yes, tail pack, at the bottom. Pull out the official Suzuki Sparking plug remover. Get it in there and push it down over the plug and use the handy 14MM open end wrench in the took kit to break the plug loose. Just bearly tight. Hmmm. Will this bike have a plug loosening problem as my BMW's had? Checked plug and it was a tannish brown and about a 035 gap easy. Can see this engine is going to like it's plugs changed at least at 14,000 mile intervals. And I don't really ever hardly rev my bike over 6000 and just about never wide open on the throttle. Just no need for my kind of riding. Put the new plug in, tighten, get the cap/coil back on after kinda putting a bit of Dielectric grease on the boot and the connector. Hook it all up. Finished with #1.
#2 = WOW. Need more room to get my old fat big fingers in there. Take the bolts out of the Thermostat and it's bracket is removed. Tie the Thermo back. AH! Room! Get connector off, Boot off, plug out, new one in and all put back together 'cept the Thermo and bracket.
#3 = Easier since I have the stuff tied back. All on and off without a problem. A little water corrosion on the plug. Maybe the dielectric grease I'm using to lube up the rubber will help prevent this. Oh well, time will tell. All back together.
#4 = WoW! The worst one by far. I undo the wiring from it's holder on the frame and tie it back towards the center of the engine. Get the connector disconnected, get the cap loose. Can't get it out. Hmmmmmm . Take the rear part of the fairing loose and able to pull it out enough to get to the bracket bolt under it. Get it off and pull all out a bit for space. AH! Success! Slide the cap off. ;-). Get the plug out and see it also has a bit of water corrosion on it. Put the new plug in and get all back together. Bracket, Fairing, Untie the hoses and wiring and put back in place. Untie the Thermo housing and put the bracket back on and attach the Thermo to it.
Do a check over to make sure all is good. It looks so. ;-)
Coffee break and hug the dog. ;-).
Put the gas tank on, connect it all up, bolt it down. Test start. Starts and Runs. Success! ;-).
Wife comes out to get the dog and see what I'm doing. ;-). Making sure I'm still alive out there.
Jack the bike all the way up on the lift table, get the oil pan, get my 17MM wrench and get the oil draining.
Time to take a good break. Probably need to go to town and get some oil now. I have 3 filters left in stock but no 10/40 oil. Sigh!
Time consumed = 2 hours.
I'm gonna wait till winter to check valves. ;-). Probably next time I change plugs. That is going to be a project like my DL1000 which was like 6 hours from roll on the table to roll off the table. Had to change every shim as they were all at the tight end of the scale.

When it comes to maintenance, I really miss the simple life of BMW R models.

achesley
06-14-2009, 11:39 AM
The rest of the Maintenance story.
Me and da Dog took a trip to Auto Zone ( about 1/2 or so miles one way ) , picked up a gallon container of Castrol 10W40. Got to the counter and the guy says , " You know you get a free oil filter with a gallon purchase?" I says , " No I didn't . " He says, " What kind do you want or for what vehicle? ". Hmmmmm " How about for an '03 Chevy truck, 2 wheel drive, single cab, long wheel base 5.3 L engine?"
He jumps on the puter and say's " Yes, we have. " And, proceeds to go get me a free Bosch > spelling < filter. Now I have a spare for my truck. ;-). Yea!

Then to the WalMart to fill up my truck and about 9.5 gallons of gas cans for the lawnmowers. 75 bucks . Wow!

Back home and put the engine oil plug back in after cleaning everything and making sure the aluminum washer had not fell off. Changed out the oil filter. Put oil in till the top of the sight glass. Walked around to the other side and put a strap on to hold the clutch in. Back to the right side where I could see the oil window. Run engine for a few seconds, enough for oil light to go out and then some. Shut engine off. Topped off oil to the H mark. Secured everything and put up the tools.

Done deal for another 3 or 4 thousand miles now.

whitesands
06-14-2009, 09:46 PM
How did it run with the new plugs and filter ?

achesley
06-15-2009, 08:22 AM
How did it run with the new plugs and filter ?

Really have not noticed any difference. I could of went an easy 14,000 more on the air filter. Plugs, not so. But, I'm very easy on my bikes. I'll do a mileage check either today to tomorrow. Just go out and burn a tank of gas. Need to do some pictures on a report I'm working on dealing with SW Louisiana Beaches. :lol2:

PhilS
06-28-2009, 07:40 PM
Guys:

I am about to hit 11,000 miles and will be doing my 24 month (or so) service at the same time. I will be replacing the brake fluid and will be doing the clutch fluid at the same time just because it's darker and dirtier and just because I can! :sun:

Two things:

1) Is there a manufacturer of Brake Fluid/Clutch Fluid that you prefer or is better than others?

2) Any real use for one of those hand pump bleeders like the Mityvac?

Thanks - Phil

achesley
06-29-2009, 01:36 PM
Guys:


Two things:

1) Is there a manufacturer of Brake Fluid/Clutch Fluid that you prefer or is better than others?

2) Any real use for one of those hand pump bleeders like the Mityvac?

Thanks - Phil

1) Just so it's a 4. Not a lot of difference in them. That coming from a warranty rep years back.
2) Several years back when changing out the brake fluid on my '97 R11R BMW I messed up the seal on the front master cylinder from pulling the handle all the way to the bar. It started leaking soon after the fluid change. When I went to get a kit to fix it , no kits sold for the bike due to product liability laws. A new one cost me 215 bucks.:eek2: I very soon got a mini vac. Have not took that chance again.

treybrad
06-29-2009, 01:44 PM
2) Any real use for one of those hand pump bleeders like the Mityvac?

I was forever a believer that they were a waste of money... I've bleed tons of brakes, cars and bikes, and though I became a fan of the SpeedBleeders, I never thought the Mityvac was something useful.

Until I found one on sale and bought it.

Boy, it's so easy and fast compared to doing it the old-fashioned way, and I feel like it does a better job too. Plus, now everytime I get a new vehicle I don't have to order new SpeedBleeders -- the Mityvac fits everything as is.

So, they're not necessary, but they are a nice tool to have.

trey

GregH
06-29-2009, 01:48 PM
I see that MityVac produces a number of different models. Which model has enough to do the job without having unnecessary features?

PhilS
06-29-2009, 02:12 PM
I see that MityVac produces a number of different models. Which model has enough to do the job without having unnecessary features?


Thanks Guys - I have not studied the Mityvac options, but Dale offers one on his site that I figured I would simply just get from him along with other crap I need. Even without replacement of the fluid, I noticed this weekend on a series of heavy twisties and subsequent butt puckering panic stopping!!!! that the brakes got a bit mushy. So, I need to bleed them off well anyway. The clutch fluid is simply a bonus since I will be in that "mode" at the moment.

Dink.1170
06-29-2009, 04:28 PM
Brake/clutch fluid get Castrol SRF you will not believe the difference until you try it.

Dink

achesley
06-29-2009, 10:54 PM
at 75 bucks US a liter. Not today. But reading up on it was neat. Now if I was racing = maybe so. Thanks for the tip, was interesting reading up on it.

bottomfeeder
06-30-2009, 08:09 PM
After reading this thread I decided to remove the gas tank and flush the coolant and replace anti freeze, replace the spark plugs and air filter.
ODO 24696 miles
I was planning to bring it into the shop but you made it sound easy -- it was -- it did take a while to figure out how to take the spark plug boot off the 2 middle plugs.
Now I guess I will try to change this stuff according to the manufacture suggestions ... thanks for the post.
It went so well I plan to change my brake pads myself ....

achesley
07-01-2009, 06:27 PM
Way to go! Most jobs are fairly easy. Just takes lots of patience and thinking through before actions. I generally do anti-freeze and brake/clutch fluid at two years. BMW wanted the hyd fluids done at 1 year. When it comes to maintenace, I really miss my Boxer twins.

whitesands
08-27-2009, 07:09 PM
O.k...Finally changed the spark plugs and was really dreading it, however it was actually much easier than I had anticipated thanks to info on the subject other folks have suggested on here...It took about 1 1/2 hours to do it....

So for other folks who have yet to do it here a few bits that made the entire process easier...

Before you start:
Loosen the right fairing, and remove the two bolts to the metal bracket (these bolts hold the bracket to the frame) that the fairing attaches to...Loosening the fairing will allow you to pull it out enough to get to the bracket bolt...You will need to push the bracket out to the side when removing plug #4 for clearance...And as soon as you get the tank off remove the bolts that hold the thermostat bracket to the frame..You will need to be able to move the thermostat housing around for clearance on #2 and #3....If you do these steps first it will significantly reduce your time...

The only tools I used for removing the plugs were :
1.The spark plug tool and 14mm open end wrench provided for by suzuki for spark plugs #1 and #4....On #1 the plug seemed pretty tight so I had to use a longer 14mm open end out of my tool box for more leverage.

2. For plugs #2 and #3, instead of the open end wrench for turning the suzuki spark plug wrench, use a 14mm socket with an extension and ratchet...This will put your wrenching efforts above the clutter.

All the plugs were in really good condition even after 14,000 miles on them...

Kelsen
08-22-2013, 09:49 PM
2008 Bandit 1250S, 15,000 miles or so.

I see no one has talked about maintenance here for several years... That bodes well for Bandit owners.

I have recently cleaned and oiled my chain, and it seems to be in excellent shape. No evident problems, and the rear sprocket also seems to be unfazed by the miles the previous owners have put on it.

I measured the stretch of the chain using the method detailed in the shop manual. It says that if 20 pitches, 10 links, measure more than 12.57 inches, that the chain should be replaced. I haven't seen anyone mention this in this thread, and I wonder if any of you have an opinion on it. Mine measured 12.6 inches or so. The chain adjusters appear to be unused, turned in not at all, which would indicate to me that the chain is *not* stretched.

Can anyone shed any light on this?

Thanks.

RFT!!!
Dave Kelsen
--
ďOh, you hate your job? Why didn't you say so? There's a support group for that. It's called EVERYBODY, and they meet at the bar.Ē -- Drew Carey

achesley
08-23-2013, 06:57 AM
pOOO yIIII I don't remember the exact miles I did on my oem chain before changing it out. Think it was somewhere around 24,000 miles. I had run completely out of adjustment coming back from Canada that year and it was flopping around quite goodly. I had changed the front sprocket at 10,000 miles due to them wearing faster than the rears. The second chain, DID, was changed out last summer around 60,000 miles with some life left but was fixing to do a good trip so put all fresh stuff on for that.

blatant
08-23-2013, 01:48 PM
Thanks for this thread, lots of great, practical info.

As for the chain lube.

I use dupont teflon multi-use
http://www.lowes.com/pd_213197-39963-D00110101_0__

There is also one strictly for chains, dupont teflon chain saver
http://www.walmart.com/ip/DuPont-Teflon-Chain-Saver-11-oz/16672659

Lowes seems to always have this stuff in stock. Marvelous stuff, use either one for the chain, can't go wrong.

Tazman2
08-26-2013, 11:50 AM
pOOO yIIII I don't remember the exact miles I did on my oem chain before changing it out. Think it was somewhere around 24,000 miles. I had run completely out of adjustment coming back from Canada that year and it was flopping around quite goodly. I had changed the front sprocket at 10,000 miles due to them wearing faster than the rears. The second chain, DID, was changed out last summer around 60,000 miles with some life left but was fixing to do a good trip so put all fresh stuff on for that.

Yikes! So you ran out on the swingarm adjustment or the measuring of the links, etc!? I'm at 26k still OEM sprockets and chain but I spray my chain every 300ish miles lately with Dupont since about 8k miles clearly its working! :rider:

Thanks for this thread, lots of great, practical info.

As for the chain lube.

I use dupont teflon multi-use
http://www.lowes.com/pd_213197-39963-D00110101_0__

There is also one strictly for chains, dupont teflon chain saver
http://www.walmart.com/ip/DuPont-Teflon-Chain-Saver-11-oz/16672659

Lowes seems to always have this stuff in stock. Marvelous stuff, use either one for the chain, can't go wrong.

If I recall the Multi isn't as good for chains anymore so use the chain saver! ;)

blatant
08-26-2013, 03:46 PM
Yikes! So you ran out on the swingarm adjustment or the measuring of the links, etc!? I'm at 26k still OEM sprockets and chain but I spray my chain every 300ish miles lately with Dupont since about 8k miles clearly its working! :rider:



If I recall the Multi isn't as good for chains anymore so use the chain saver! ;)

maybe, maybe not but it's never steered me wrong. Data to back up your claim that it's not so hot anymore. Also i'm not saying it's better than the one that has the word "chain" in it. Just curious.

Tazman2
08-26-2013, 05:56 PM
maybe, maybe not but it's never steered me wrong. Data to back up your claim that it's not so hot anymore. Also i'm not saying it's better than the one that has the word "chain" in it. Just curious.

Yes actually...

http://www2.dupont.com/Consumer_Lubricants/en_US/products/multi_use_lubricant.html

:trust:

achesley
08-27-2013, 05:50 AM
Motorcycle Consumer News tested the old vs new Dupont. They say the old is better. This is the only motorcycle mag that accepts no advertising. What they see is what you get, no candycoating. I've been using the old teflon for several years now. On tour, I lube the chain every night while hot.
I had ran out of adjustment on the swing arm adj bolts, Could not move the wheel any further back. When a chain gets towards the end of it's life, it goes fast. I probably had about 2000 miles of dusty gravel roads in the mix also on that first chain.
On my KLR , I'm lucky to get 10K miles but do about 40% dusty gravel with it down here. And, it's my go to everyday bike for local use. Love that 400 lbs full of gas and +50 miles per gallon. I've used nothing but Dupont Teflon on it for years also.
About every 2000 on the KLR , it gets a kerosene bath and scrubbing. Ditto at about 5000 on the Bandit.

Kalts
09-02-2013, 02:03 PM
Here is something I found while touring in Romania last month. On my 2007SA the front brake lever hinders bleeding because it limits piston pushback. I could not get air out of master cylinder by actuating the lever and had to remove it. After lever removal the piston was free to move as far back as the construction foresees and by actuating piston with screwdriver all air bleed out easily.

Never seen such problem before and my wife rides DL650 which supposedly has same front brake assembly on the handlebar. Could be that front brake lever has been replaced with low quality one in the past, althought it looks like OEM.

achesley
09-02-2013, 09:15 PM
May have be changed out Kalts. I've done my front brake fluid about 3 times since I've had my 2007 1250S with no problems.