PDA

View Full Version : Speedbleeder – brake bleeding made easy


dwoodul
01-04-2008, 09:04 AM
Sorry if this is old news but...

I didn’t pull anything on a search so I thought I’d tell everyone about what I think is an easy and fast way of replacing/changing your brake/clutch fluid. I’ve been using these “speedbleeders” for about 7 years (on my last 3 bikes) and have had very good results. The speedbleeder simply replaces your old bleeder screw. The speedbleeder has a spring loaded valve (ball bearing) inside the unit that prevents air from being sucked back into the slave cylinder while bleeding the brake fluid. Here’s how I change my brake/clutch fluid in about 5 minutes with no mess (and no bubbles) at all.

First, simply replace the old bleeder screw with the speedbleeder. Then…

1) Attach the included rubber hose (you can order from speedbleeder and reuse) to the speedbleeder’s nipple which will empty into a receptacle for disposal.
2) Loosen the speedbleeder about one quarter turn (to open it for draining fluid)
3) Remove the master cylinder’s fluid reservoir cover.
4) Then simply pump the master brake or clutch lever to pump the old fluid out the speedbleeder while, at the same time, pouring new fluid into the master reservoir making sure you don’t run the reservoir too low (and let air in the line)
5) Keep pumping and adding fresh fluid until the fluid runs out clear then tighten the speedbleeder and put the reservoir cover back on making sure the reservoir has the correct amount of fluid in it.

You’re done and with a little practice you can do this in about 10 minutes or less. Works the same for the clutch. Using this method you’ll never fight with re-priming the system or those nasty air bubbles that are so hard to get out using the old method.

Go to: http://www.speedbleeder.com/ to purchase these things. I believe you’ll need the 7100S (qty 2) for the front calipers and the 8125L (qty 2) for the clutch and rear caliper. The regular bleeders run about $7 each but I use the stainless steal SS models which run $15 each.

I’ve ordered them so let me install them and test and I’ll update this thread with exactly what part#s you’ll need. Once you’ve used these things you’ll swear by them (no I don’t own any SB stock – just like the convenience :-) ).

BTW – I’ve been using the Valvoline synthetic brake fluid for a while with good results. It replaces and is compatible with DOT3 or DOT4. Here again let me test this stuff on the Bandit’s systems and I’ll update with the results.

Regards,

Ol Dave

DaveC
01-04-2008, 09:10 AM
:clap:
:thumb:
:rider:
:pirate:
a very good product. The cost these devices is less than having a shop bleed your systems ( I have a hydrolic clutch). Typical it takes less than 10 minutes from start to clean up.

kurt
01-04-2008, 09:15 AM
It has been discussed before. The Luddites will be along shortly. I'm a fan. :-P

DFW_Warrior
01-04-2008, 09:19 AM
I think they are neat, but I've never needed them. I've bled my brakes on all my bikes by myself with the normal old school bleed valves since day one. And it only takes me a max of 10 minutes to do dual discs up front, and less than 5 minutes to do the rear.

Plus, I have seen first hand on how the speed bleeders hold air in the lines when we were trying to install braided lines on a GSXR. We pulled them off, and replaced them with the stockers and bled the brakes in a heartbeat. But with the Speedbleeders on, it just held the air in without pumping it out.

kurt
01-04-2008, 09:22 AM
I think they are neat, but I've never needed them. I've bled my brakes on all my bikes by myself with the normal old school bleed valves since day one. And it only takes me a max of 10 minutes to do dual discs up front, and less than 5 minutes to do the rear.

Plus, I have seen first hand on how the speed bleeders hold air in the lines when we were trying to install braided lines on a GSXR. We pulled them off, and replaced them with the stockers and bled the brakes in a heartbeat. But with the Speedbleeders on, it just held the air in without pumping it out.

See! :lol2: They don't work if you are replacing lines, but for fluid change, they are the perfect.

DaveC
01-04-2008, 09:39 AM
But with the Speedbleeders on, it just held the air in without pumping it out.

This makes since, they are designed with the idea of having a fuid pressure not air pressure.:doh: This is good info as it would take several hours of frustration to come around if it comes around at all.:lol2: I do not think it is in the instructions either.

treybrad
01-04-2008, 09:47 AM
+1, I've used them on 2 cars, 2 bikes, and my truck. The other bleeding tip I just recently learned was to wrap a big rubber band or zip tie to compress the brake lever and leave it overnight after bleeding them. Something about pressurizing the system over a long period of time like that helps force the last bit of air out, up into the resivoir.

Logic behind that? I dunno, but it made for a nice, firm lever on the SV when I did it last time.

trey

DFW_Warrior
01-04-2008, 10:27 AM
It has been discussed before. The Luddites will be along shortly. I'm a fan. :-P

Newer doesn't always mean better my friend..... without the speed bleeders we could've bled his lines in a few minutes with no mess. But with them, it took almost an hour of messing with them before finally giving up and installing the stock ones.

Not all the time, but sometimes old school will still win out.

dwoodul
01-04-2008, 11:13 AM
Sorry everyone – I didn’t see that this had been discussed before and thanks for the head-up on speedbleeder issues. I’ve replaced lines etc. before even rebuilt calipers/replaced pistons using speedbleeders and never had any issues. I’ve never had them hold air in the lines. I may have just been lucky. I tried these because I had trouble using the old method and getting all the air out of the lines but I’m not a mechanic and there may have been something I missed.

Anyway – thanks for the info and sorry if I wasted a thread.

Ol Dave

DaveC
01-04-2008, 11:29 AM
it maybe new to someone, besides it is just ones and zeros!:lol2:

When I do a line replacement I Leave the bleeder open until the fluid runs. I also assist it using a myte-vac. Needless to say I do not do it very often.

flb_78
01-04-2008, 11:30 AM
Sorry everyone – I didn’t see that this had been discussed before and thanks for the head-up on speedbleeder issues. I’ve replaced lines etc. before even rebuilt calipers/replaced pistons using speedbleeders and never had any issues. I’ve never had them hold air in the lines. I may have just been lucky. I tried these because I had trouble using the old method and getting all the air out of the lines but I’m not a mechanic and there may have been something I missed.

Anyway – thanks for the info and sorry if I wasted a thread.

Ol Dave

No such thing as a wasted thread!

wonder91178
01-04-2008, 11:34 AM
No such thing as a wasted thread!
Have you SEEN some of our threads? :rofl:

DFW_Warrior
01-04-2008, 12:07 PM
Have you SEEN some of our threads? :rofl:

HAHAHAHAHA:rofl: :rofl:

Stephen Max
01-04-2008, 12:53 PM
When I do a line replacement I Leave the bleeder open until the fluid runs. I also assist it using a myte-vac.

Exactly. This just seems like common sense to me.

Roy
01-04-2008, 01:28 PM
Mighty Vac and 15 minutes tops air is completely out of the master cylinder and lines and that was starting with a dry master cylinder that was just added on.