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etcthorne
03-11-2008, 04:28 PM
I know - I'm gonna get flame-sprayed for posting this here instead of the "correct" gear thread, but this is such a friendly group, and I feel like I know you all from the past few months' worth of banter.

I'm thinking of taking the $750.00 plunge for a Roadcrafter one-piece suit (Blue with hi-viz yellow ballistic patches). All the reviews I've read say that it doesn't get any better than Roadcrafter, but I wanted to hear some comments from anyone here who has one and uses it on the Bandit. Temperature extremes, level of protection, etc....

Thanks. And if the powers that be deem this needs to be moved, then feel free to move it (like I have any power to keep it from being moved).


:rofl:

Ixta
03-11-2008, 05:42 PM
Aerostich's Roadcrafter suit/pants/jackets are great riding gear - up to about 80 degrees F. It's a bit warm after 80 and brutal above 90.

Bullet proof design and made to last for years (and years).

I live in mine in the winter. However, it stays on the hanger spring through fall.

X1Glider
03-11-2008, 05:50 PM
Owned one about 6 years ago. Sold it because it didn't keep me dry. Even though it was Gore-Tex, the seams weren't taped and the front zipper and flap wasn't completely waterproof. I spent one weekend in a heavy downpour and got a wet chest and inner legs. Sold it to a die-hard fan of the suit who wanted a spare soon after. I ride rain or shine, no matter how heavy and that was unacceptable for my purposes. Per your request about the bike...I was on an unfaired HD FXR. I still don't think that should have mattered. That's my singular experience. But, I have heard that their customer service is second to none, will rectify problems and even do a one time alteration free of charge. The guy that bought mine still owns it and loves it, BTW. Just didn't work for me.

sharkey
03-11-2008, 06:41 PM
Bought mine used and then sold it. It fit me real snug and it was real hot. It's not for TX weather.

I found a 1 pc textile for 1/2 of what I paid for the used Stitch and it is much better. Sadly, they don't make them anymore.

Roy
03-11-2008, 06:43 PM
I have one, black on black one piece :mrgreen: I like it alot very functional. Not super warm without some sort of electric liner. i use a Gerbing jacket liner not too bulky and very warm. too me the one piece gets warm on my legs in anything above 80 degrees. If touring I can tolerate it but around town I prefer just the RC jacket.

I also have a black on black Roadcrafter jacket for the occasional solo ride.

Both money well spent.:trust:

ndmiller
03-11-2008, 08:00 PM
Had a Black with Gray trim one piece for 5+ years and still is my #1 gear choice for riding wet or dry, cold or hot. Ridden in the winter in New Jersey <30F and Summers in South Florida 90+ and raining, week long trips and weekend errands. The flexibility of use alone outweighs any negatives I have found.

I have upgraded to better armor, sent back for an additional adjustment and continue to wash regularly to dissolve the regular splatter of bug and road grime and the occasional dirt road.

KenB
03-11-2008, 08:14 PM
I had a Roadcrafter for one season and didn't really care for it. Or at least, not for the price. It was like wearing a snowmobile suit. It had a leaky crotch. It was hot above 80 and didn't have sufficient venting. It hasn't been redesigned in many, many years and it shows.

I'm certain the Aerostich gear will provide adequate protection. But for my money a 2-piece Air Glide setup from Olympia is more versatile, less expensive, as durable, as protective, more practical, more comfortable, and much better looking.

dutchinterceptor
03-11-2008, 10:57 PM
I finally purchased a one piece roadcrafter after deliberating for two years. The primary reason I went with the stich was because they do alterations. I used their fit calculator on their site. They emailed me the size recommendation and I ordered it. After receiving it, I sat on the bike for a while and decided what alterations I needed. Returned that suit and ordered "my" suit. Two weeks later I was in business. It took a while for the first one because they were out of my size but the customer service was great.

I definitely had sticker shock after my alterations and backpad but I don't regret it a bit. The quality is good and the ability to jump in and out of it while wearing my street clothes is worth twice the price for me. The first and most noticeable complaint is they are stiff as a board when new but that goes away soon enough. The zippers on the sleeves have a tendency to come undone but it's not a big deal for me. I know everybody is different but the venting is a lot better than what I had been reading. I figure I'll be using mine all summer.

I haven't had the pleasure of water testing mine yet but it seems that it depends on how often the suit is treated with a water repellant. A friend joked the other day, the way to keep the crotch from leaking is to stand up occasionally to let the pool of water drain off....problem solved.

On the Bandit you may not require any alterations but either way I highly recommend one. :thumb:

Dirtrideroader
03-11-2008, 11:06 PM
I have one that my lovely Wife bought for me for our anniverary in 2001. It is not the best at anything, but it is what I wear 98% of the time I ride. I have ridden for hours in pouring rain on a R1150GS and not gotten the legendary wet crotch. I got the two piece, just to give me a little more flexibility. I don't know if it leaks less than the 1 piece, but I like it.

mlinkibikr
03-12-2008, 08:46 AM
I commute to work everyday on my bike - so the one piece keeps me clean, dry, and comfy. My business casual clothing isn't mussed at all by the suit as was the case with wearing my leather jacket.

I haven't had the issues with the heat, but mine is a light color and I assume this reflects better than the darker colors. I've noticed that wearing the suit is actually cooler than than not wearing it - I suspect that there is some benefit in shielding the reflective heat off of the road surface? Sounds weird but that's been my experience.

The one piece is so dang easy to pull on and off but I would love to try the two piece setup as I suspect that it might be mre versatile if I wanted to go with the 'Stich bottoms with a leather top sometime.

Dave.

buck000
03-12-2008, 09:04 AM
I've had my 2-piece Roadcrafter for, yoiks, over 5 years now. I use it for temps from 40-105 degrees. Below 40, I tend to want my Gerbing vest/gloves, and above 95 I only bake when I stop. ;-)

I experienced some leakage a number of years ago when riding in a deluge. I complained to Aerostich, got the following response from Andy Goldfine, the owner:

I am sorry your suit and glove raincovers caused you problems. There are some easy things you can do to improve the water leaking situation a lot. As you note, the suits are compromised by the design (vents, entry system, etc...). First, if you want to use any wash-in waterproofing at any time on a new garment, it will improve the performance. The suit's fabric is already waterproof. But the zippers are not. The wash in waterproofing treatment will help the knit zipper tapes become more water resistant. The reason the crotch gets wet is because rain strikes the front of the suit and is funneled by folds across the torso into the zipper by the crotch. From there it soaks through the knit tape the zipper teeth are attached to and drips into the suit. One way to lessen this is to smooth out the folds across the front of the suit that gutter rainwater, somewhat like pulling a tunic or sweater taught after standing up. This helps a lot but is not practical for all day rides in rain. Two useful things that are practical: 1. Applying liquid seam sealant to the knit tape and adjacent stitching. and 2. Using a wash in water repellent to help the knit zipper tape resist water a little better. The seam sealant method is more permanent. Instructions for doing this are in the suit owners guide and also in a .pdf file attached to this message. These changes will make a difference you will notice.

I followed the instructions, and periodically nik-wax the suit after washing it with the nik-wax detergent, and while I haven't been in a downpour to really test it, rain is generally not a problem.

I'm quite comfortable with my RC. Best of luck.

X1Glider
03-12-2008, 10:14 AM
I figured the ability to get in and out of the suit in less than 20 seconds was the culprit to not being very water proof. So what if the fabric is? The seams and zippers are not. If you can't tour in it in the rain, what good is it? To have to seal your own seams too is unacceptable. For the money it should be much better.

Olympia has a pretty good 1 piece, I think it's called the Phantom, not sure though. It's about $500. Even the $300 Fieldsheer Highlander is pretty good, though I've had some water ingress from a leg zipper once. I still use my 9 year old Intersport for long trips where I'm in the saddle for 12+ hours a day and will probably get poured on for hours on end, day in, day out. Never let me down yet. Only flaw is it isn't armored. Unfortunately, it's out of production so I hope someone will make a worthy replacement in the future. God forbid something hapens to it.

cdc1
03-12-2008, 10:45 AM
I have used a 2 piece Roadcrafter for 10 years, It still is my "go to" suit when I go on a ride. I wear it year round and change the layers underneath to match the weather. Summertime, I wear shorts and t-shirt underneath, wintertime, I wear longjohns or fleece with an electric jacket. It is the right piece of gear 80-90% of the time with the different layers underneath. The 2 piece suit always seemed more versitle as you can remove the jacket at stops and leave the pants on. Wearing the Roadcrafter allows me to take a minimal amount of other clothes on a trip. It allows to also leave a rainsuit at home, yes I have gotten a wet crotch with the Roadcrafter, but only after a very heavy downpour, this will depend on your bike fairing coverage. The big thing for me is the convience and safety factor of not having to anticipate rain and stop to put on or take off a rainsuit on the side of the road. When you get ready to order, call and talk to the sales dept and get their input. Order a standard size "off the rack" suit as a starting reference because you will probably want some alterations and they will accept a return of a standard size suit, but not a suit that has been altered. Choose wisely as this suit will last you a very long time. After 10 years, mine is a little faded and has a few worn spots, but still looks and works good.

Roy
03-12-2008, 11:18 AM
I figured the ability to get in and out of the suit in less than 20 seconds was the culprit to not being very water proof. So what if the fabric is? The seams and zippers are not. If you can't tour in it in the rain, what good is it? To have to seal your own seams too is unacceptable. For the money it should be much better.

Olympia has a pretty good 1 piece, I think it's called the Phantom, not sure though. It's about $500. Even the $300 Fieldsheer Highlander is pretty good, though I've had some water ingress from a leg zipper once. I still use my 9 year old Intersport for long trips where I'm in the saddle for 12+ hours a day and will probably get poured on for hours on end, day in, day out. Never let me down yet. Only flaw is it isn't armored. Unfortunately, it's out of production so I hope someone will make a worthy replacement in the future. God forbid something hapens to it.

I would rather crash in anything Aerostich verses the others. Been there done that. The stich will literally save your hide if you go down. All this talk of leaking, really this is sounding like and oil thread:doh: I have owned all types and brands of gear in 25+ years, it all had some downfall or another. Usually the other brands simply fall apart over time with virtually no after the sale product support. Aerostich excels here in this and one call will have you wondering why the **** did I ever buy from anyone else. US product taken care of by good old americans.:mrgreen: even if they do sound nasally up north:lol2:

You get what you pay for;-) I'd rather keep americans working than someone in pakistan or china and if it cost a little more just remember they have to buy groceries at our prices, gas, health care and so on, are you seeing the light now.

rworm
03-12-2008, 02:06 PM
I thought this was a ROADCRAFTER?????:doh:


http://www.ebaumsworld.com/video/watch/242269/

rworm

Dirtrideroader
03-12-2008, 02:28 PM
I thought this was a ROADCRAFTER?????:doh:


No, but he looks like he could have benefited from having one on...

buck000
03-12-2008, 04:34 PM
It allows to also leave a rainsuit at home, yes I have gotten a wet crotch with the Roadcrafter, but only after a very heavy downpour, this will depend on your bike fairing coverage.

That's a really good point. In the deluge that caused me to complain to Aerostich, I must admit (but didn't to Aerostich :doh:) that the way my legs wrapped to the tank of the Futura, it formed a nice pool of water that just sat there.

I'll be off to Indy for the MotoGP, and will probably take a rainsuit in case I run into a huge storm I have to ride through...Still worth having a Roadcrafter, imho... :rider:

NUTT
03-12-2008, 06:06 PM
I just got a pretty good deal on a used Roadcrafter 1 piece over on ADV. It should be here within the next couple of days.

My attire & work location is changing in 2 weeks when I start my new position (same company, just a promotion) so I thought the 'stitch might be just the thing. I'm getting some new boots too. The Sidi B2's are a bit too extreme for the Uly.

smoothtexasrider
03-12-2008, 06:49 PM
Take a good look at the Olympia brand Phantom suit and the lighter Olympia Stealth suit before you take the 'Stich plunge. The Phantom is every bit as protective and high quality as the Stich and runs about $450. The Stealth is a lighter, warm weather suit for about $300. I have looked at the Phantom at Moto Liberty; I have yet to see a Stealth in person.

www.olympiamotosports.com

ndmiller
03-12-2008, 07:31 PM
I'm certain the Aerostich gear will provide adequate protection. But for my money a 2-piece Air Glide setup from Olympia is more versatile, less expensive, as durable, as protective, more practical, more comfortable, and much better looking.

While my 'Stich is #1, to be fair the Olympia AST Jacket, Ranger Pants are a definite second. Olympia stuff is exceptional value for the money. I agree with everything you said, except the Olympia being more practical. I can wear shorts and a tee, throw on my 'Stich, get to where I am going and be back in shorts and tee in 20 seconds.

suzukijo
03-12-2008, 09:46 PM
I thought this was a ROADCRAFTER?????:doh:


http://www.ebaumsworld.com/video/watch/242269/

rworm

good example of what hover sounds like at redline.