PDA

View Full Version : When to Replace Chain?


GregH
04-26-2008, 10:31 AM
What are the indicators that your chain needs to be replaced?
(Listen up you wiseguys, I'm seriously asking the question. I know that if it's laying on the street it should be replaced, etc,...:giveup: )

suzukijo
04-26-2008, 11:00 AM
13,006 miles.

GregH
04-26-2008, 11:07 AM
13,006 miles.
I'll set my odometer. :mrgreen:

kurt
04-26-2008, 11:30 AM
When it starts popping and kinking as you spin the rear tire. Other signs are a rust colored powder coating the chain, missing o-rings or excessively hot to the touch after riding.

suzukijo
04-26-2008, 12:03 PM
wiseguy, eh? ....nyuk, nyuk, nyuk.......nnnnnnn.

http://img125.imageshack.us/img125/8183/3stoogesiq1.jpg

manual says when 20 pitches reach 319.4mm.
i replaced mine with 2mm to go, you can feel the movement of the wear in the links by pulling the chain.

http://img238.imageshack.us/img238/2872/img3672xv2.jpg

http://img125.imageshack.us/img125/5185/img3670ye1.jpg

waiting for the chain to stretch that 2mm more, one would certainly need to replace the sprockets at that time also.

rworm
04-26-2008, 08:42 PM
wiseguy, eh? ....nyuk, nyuk, nyuk.......nnnnnnn.

http://img125.imageshack.us/img125/8183/3stoogesiq1.jpg

manual says when 20 pitches reach 319.4mm.
i replaced mine with 2mm to go, you can feel the movement of the wear in the links by pulling the chain.

http://img238.imageshack.us/img238/2872/img3672xv2.jpg

http://img125.imageshack.us/img125/5185/img3670ye1.jpg

waiting for the chain to stretch that 2mm more, one would certainly need to replace the sprockets at that time also.
So how are you cleaning your chain?????
rworm

rworm
04-26-2008, 09:16 PM
This is what the cleaning steps for dirt bikes are, and our bike are not in anyway in the same environment as they are:
Taken rom:http://www.dirtrider.com/tech/141_0312_dirtbike_chain_maint
enance/index.html

How to maintain your chain quickly and easily
How to maintain your dirt bike's chain quickly and easily.

(wire brush)After a race or ride, chances are your bike's chain is going to be dirty. Just how dirty depends on the conditions, of course. A sloppy mud race will foul the chain with significantly more debris than a supercross main event with its perfectly groomed surface. So the first step is to clean the bike, taking care not to direct jets of water from a pressure washer at the chain as that could force water into the chain's internals, displacing lubricant. Instead, after washing the bike, use a wire brush to remove caked-on dirt, grease or rust. If you're running an O-ring chain, skip this step as you'll damage the O-rings, which will degrade their protective capability. If you feel you must clean your O-ring chain, simply wipe it off with a rag and know that you're merely cleaning it for aesthetic reasons.

Lubricate the chain. Chase advises spraying the inside of the chain near the countershaft sprocket while spinning the rear wheel. This helps minimize lubricant flinging off. If you have an O-ring chain, use a light-viscosity lube to prevent surface rust and keep the rubber O-rings pliable. The reason for this is that O-ring chains are prelubricated and those O-rings help keep lube in and debris-and external lube-out. Do not use penetrating-oil-type lubes, including WD-40. These sprays contain solvents that can damage the O-rings or even wash away the factory grease.

If you find that the sprocket's teeth are excessively worn-especially if they're hook-shaped or exhibit high wear on the inner and/or outer sides-chances are the chain needs to be replaced. And if you replace the chain, you should also replace both sprockets at the same time. These three items wear as a set, which shouldn't be a surprise if you think about it.

Marc B
04-26-2008, 09:32 PM
I have a confession, I used brake cleaner! I have sinned! It did dry quick and I hosed the chain down with soap and water then towel dried it and sprayed a generous amount of chain wax soon after....I hope my o=rings are still there. I had forgotten about them when i did it. I think its OK,its still smooth rolling.

Diderich
04-26-2008, 09:37 PM
other things to look for on the chain is it might be worn out if you've had to adjust the slack frequently, and have moved the axle back pretty far from where it started. You'll also see the sprockets worn pointy sometimes. Clean it and keep it in spec for slack though and chains last a good long time. I changed mine at 20,000 (triumph sprint) only because i got bored and wanted a smaller sprocket on the front...

Marc B
04-26-2008, 09:50 PM
other things to look for on the chain is it might be worn out if you've had to adjust the slack frequently, and have moved the axle back pretty far from where it started. You'll also see the sprockets worn pointy sometimes. Clean it and keep it in spec for slack though and chains last a good long time. I changed mine at 20,000 (triumph sprint) only because i got bored and wanted a smaller sprocket on the front...

Did the smaller C.S sprocket give it a little longer legs? and how much longer was 1st gear, did you have to slip the clutch any to get er goin?

suzukijo
04-26-2008, 09:59 PM
So how are you cleaning your chain?????
rworm

i cleaned my chain once, described in the mega thread.
the dirt on it, in the pic, was after taking it back out of the trash.
i just spray lube on it, often a quick shot at the end of the day.

John Bennett
04-27-2008, 08:39 AM
manual says when 20 pitches reach 319.4mm.

Cool. I like objective specs for things mechanical.

GregH
04-27-2008, 12:05 PM
Yeah, this is helpful for non-wrench types like me. I need specs to follow since I don't have the experience to eyeball things.

PhilS
05-06-2008, 09:19 PM
Guys:

The mechanic at the Suzuki dealer adjusted my chain last week with me sitting on the bike. I assume the adjustment is different with or without someone on the bike???:shrug:

Can y'all chime in on this? I willbe pulling the wheel off next week and need to re-adjust.

Thanks - Phil

Manfred
05-06-2008, 09:39 PM
Did the smaller C.S sprocket give it a little longer legs? and how much longer was 1st gear, did you have to slip the clutch any to get er goin?

A smaller counter shaft sprocket lowers the gear ratio, making the engine run at higher RPMs for the same speed. Ergo, one is more likely to spin the rear tire with a smaller CS sprocket, not slip the clutch.