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Marc B
05-25-2008, 07:37 PM
What dial in do you big guys use ? Im 230 and still have mine set at factory, Was wondering what a little clockwise adjustment might do for the curves, As it is i dont experience any diving or anything bad, I know i'll have to play with it some to decide whats best for me but maybe someone could save me some guess work...Thanks.

sproggy
05-27-2008, 10:25 AM
If you're heavier than 'normal' you should be looking at increasing rear preload first - probably to around No. 6, +/-1. with an increase in rear rebound damping too.

Increasing front preload will slow the steering and make the front end feel harsh (which it is already as standard for most people) so if you don't notice anything bad about the forks I'd suggest leaving them as they are.

MetrickMetal
05-27-2008, 11:23 AM
What dial in do you big guys use ? Im 230 and still have mine set at factory, Was wondering what a little clockwise adjustment might do for the curves, As it is i dont experience any diving or anything bad, I know i'll have to play with it some to decide whats best for me but maybe someone could save me some guess work...Thanks.


Race Tech and Works Performance typically tell you to use between 1/4 to 1/3 of the total rear wheel travel for the static sag of the suspension on a street bike.

To determine the amount of static sag, put the bike up on the center stand and accurately measure from the center of the axle to a point on the bike directly above the axle. Call this measurement S1.

To check the sag on my Bandit I place a piece of masking tape along the edge of the tail section directly above the axle with a black felt pen line on it.

Next with you sitting on the bike have someone and balancing the bike with one foot, have someone push down on the back of the bike (about 1") and let it rise slowly, now record the measurement from the center of the axle to the same point on the bike. Call this measurement S2.

Next lift up on the suspension and let it drop very slowly and record the measurement from the center of the axle to the same refference point on the bike. Call this measurement S3.

The reason S2 and S3 are different is due to stiction or drag in the seals and the suspension linkage. Half way between S1 and S2 is where it would come to rest with no stiction. Therefore S2 and S3 must be averaged and subtracted from S1 to calculate your true Static Sag.
Static Sag = S1 - (S2 + S3)/2

This same procedure also applies to checking the static sag on your front suspension, and remember that increasing / decreasing the preload does not increase / decrease the rate of the spring, but it does increase / decrease the amount of force required (as in hitting a bump) to get the suspension moving. :rider:

AXEL
05-27-2008, 10:17 PM
I'm with El Bandito. At your weight you will need stronger fork springs to achieve correct sag settings. And don't be concerned about them making the front harsher.

sproggy
05-28-2008, 04:36 AM
Since sz rider has already stated that:

As it is i dont experience any diving or anything bad

I think it's a bit premature to be recommending changing the springs. There's a fair bit of preload adjustment to try out before shelling out money on stiffer springs, and the needs of a rider are dictated as much by his riding style (and position) as they are by theoretical static sag guidelines. If he's happy with the forks as they are, why change? It's only when you start pushing a bike hard (which a lot of people never do) that you find the limits of the stock suspension.

Front preload is very easy to adjust - give it a try on different settings before trying anything else.

achesley
06-03-2008, 07:15 PM
Well , what I did was back off one line on the front, back off a couple numbers on the rear, set the dampning to 1.75 turn from closed. It made for a way softer ride. I'm not trying to road race the thing, just want to make it a comfy DL bike. I'm about 245 with riding gear on. So far I'm not bottoming out on anything and that's fine with this older dude. Heck, it still goes around corners way faster than I can.