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View Full Version : I cut down my windscreen this weekend.


chiko
03-20-2005, 12:59 PM
http://home.houston.rr.com/echipko/windscreen/images/Side.jpg

You can see the full story
here (http://home.houston.rr.com/echipko/windscreen/Windscreen.htm)

Tourmeister
03-21-2005, 12:42 AM
Other than the bug issues, the windflow on my GS without any windscreen at all is pretty smooth. I do that sometimes in the summer to get more air on me.

Were you having buffeting issues or just the noise?

Adios,

whoa
03-21-2005, 02:19 PM
I wonder the same thing. The screen on the Tiger slopes up harshly so has to have some impact on economy and does create buffeting. So your post inspired me to pull my wind screen and install a prototype fly screen.

Did this last night so not enough miles at speed yet, but it seems to have moved the slipstream from my head to chest so calms things down a bit.

chiko
03-21-2005, 07:20 PM
I was really just trying to reduce the noise.
I have had only today to evaluate but in the up position, I detect no change even with the 3 big slots cut in the bottom part.

In the down position the noise is at a slightly higher and less annoying pitch but I dont think the volume is reduced.

I am at least happy that the construction is holding together well and that the screen didnt start to shake. I think putting mounting points on three different planes was a good idea. MSO says it doesnt make the bike uglier.

Tourmeister
03-21-2005, 08:06 PM
MSO says it doesnt make the bike uglier.

Well of course it doesn't!! Hard to improve on perfection :rofl I often think the GS's are so ugly only an owner could love them... ;-)

Adios,

whoa
03-23-2005, 04:48 PM
I took a paint bucket and cut it to make a small screen, similar to yours. It is much better.

My issue is if I cut my stock windscreen and want it back to original, the replacement is $200. Triumph sells a sports screen, which is solid color to match the bike and just covers to the top of the fairing, but it goes for $175.

Can't find a third party sports screen but there is a third party full screen for $80. Need to find out if the third party screen is any good or not.

So for those who have done this, what materials did you check into? I'm thinking some good quality plastic, or plexiglass that can take UVs would do. Finding something that goes with bright green is not the easiest thing to do.

And did anybody go through this, only to end up going back to OEM parts?

chiko
03-23-2005, 07:59 PM
I took a paint bucket and cut it to make a small screen, similar to yours. It is much better.


I wanna see the paint bucket.

By much better, do you mean your paint bucket is better than my hacked up Givi or that there better noise control with the paint bucket than with the stock triumph?;-)

I checked replacement and mine would have been $100 if I totally blew it.

ceebaileys (http://www.ceebaileys.com/triumph/tigerws.html) has replacements for a bit over $100.

whoa
03-23-2005, 11:42 PM
I wanna see the paint bucket.

Not as glamorous as it sounds.
http://home.austin.rr.com/goodoldays/sportscreen.jpg


By much better, do you mean your paint bucket is better than my hacked up Givi or that there better noise control with the paint bucket than with the stock triumph?;-)

LOL, for whatever reason, the sports screen prototype is more comfortable than the stock larger windscreen. Not noise but with the buffeting.

Although, there is less to hide behind. So for colder/wetter climates, the bigger windscreen makes sense.

The original screen isn't that big, but it curves up pretty harshly so creates some turbulance.

http://home.austin.rr.com/goodoldays/newtiger.jpg

cruisin
05-03-2005, 03:47 PM
Just a couple of quick suggestions: try searching around your local Home Depot or Lowe's for some 1/8" and 3/16" Lexan (polycarbonate). That is what most of the large winscreen manufacturers are using these days--much more durable than plastic or plexiglass. It can be cut with jig saws and band saws then heated and shaped using a heat gun but you have to go slowly so as not to create discoloring and bubbles in the material. I would also recommend building your (non-working) prototypes out of plain poster board until you are pretty sure of shape and size, then go to cutting on the Lexan or paint buckets then Lexan.

On polishing the edges to get a factory roundness and smoothenss, use one of those wheels that fits in a drill or drill press that looks like a sponge but is very rigid. It will buff the edges smooth and round them slightly at the same time. You just have to be careful and not get it onto your flat surface, it will scratch the dickens out of your pretty new screen if you do. Maybe protect your flat surfaces with duct tape until the edges are finished to your satisfaction.