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Alex74
09-16-2009, 11:52 AM
Anybody here spent a signifigant amount of time on the v7 classic. I don't know much about the Guzzi: Reliability, Shaft drive issues. Deciding between that and the T-100 Bonneville. I test driven both. The distance is so short to come up with a conclusion. I really liked the stock sound of the Guzzi. Please Help.

DaveC
09-16-2009, 12:02 PM
The Guzzi sounds like the one! ;-)

Alex74
09-16-2009, 12:31 PM
Yeh Dave I sure like it. Just can't get used to the hd sporty ride position. I was thinking about a dual sport, but that isn't the kind of riding i'll do. Just my little 2 mile commute and hill country riding.

kurt
09-16-2009, 01:32 PM
I have a Stelvio That is trouble free and a hoot to ride. It has all day comfortable ergonomics and can be configured with bags and a top case to haul with the best of them. Perhaps we can arrange a real test ride.

wildebube
09-16-2009, 03:00 PM
The Guzzi small block has been in production for close to 40 years and is well developed and well sorted. I havenít ridden a V7 Classic myself, but by all accounts itís a great bike and owners seem to love them. The non-C.A.R.C. shaft is solid. There were some problems with the early C.A.R.C. shafts on the big blocks, but those seem to have been resolved.

Moto Guzzi has a great sound and tons of character. Itís hard to describe, but itís much like Italian cars: thereís just something about them thatís different than anything else. Theyíre not necessarily smoother, faster, better handling, or anything else, but they somehow just manage to feel ďrightĒ and push all the right buttons. The V7C has gotten rave reviews from Guzzista Ė for whatever thatís worth.

Moto Guzzi is not without its issues though. Mechanically, they have a history of small problems that are usually fairly easy to fix, but troublesome just the same. Fuel pump issues on recent bikes are a good example. Iím not sure if the V7C is involved or not, but I know that there have been fuel pump problems with some recent Guzzis. The fuel pump is inside the tank and uses fuel line that is not alcohol resistant and is not adequately clamped to the pump. Consequently, here in the land of gasohol, the fuel lines swell and/or deteriorate, pop off of the pump, and leave you pumping fuel around the tank rather than to the injectors. Fairly easy to fix, but not something you should have to fix on a new motorcycle. These problems are exacerbated by a small dealer network and an even smaller good dealer network.

Take a look at this thread ( http://wildguzzi.com/forum/index.php?topic=27852.0) on wildguzzi for one horror story and some interesting quotes from Guzzi riders. Things like count on spending an additional 10% to finish the bike. Or maybe the first 20K miles can be frustrating, but the next 180K will be great. Like every other bike on the market, thereís a small percentage of them that really have problems, but those get a lot of attention.

Another issue is that Moto Guzzi seems to be perpetually on the ropes. Once again, they are in transition. On the verge of closing the doors for good in 2004, Moto Guzzi was bought by Aprilia. Then before too long Aprilia found themselves in trouble as well and they were recently bought by the Piaggio group. Right now it seems to be nearly impossible to get solid information on what is in the cards for Moto Guzzi. Piaggio has publicly stated that they intend to keep making Moto Guzzis, but they havenít said a lot more than that. There are also seemingly hundreds of stories floating around as to the future of the factory in Mandello. Some say itís closing, some say itís closed, and some say that it just shut down for the summer for the model changeover and is now back open. And each story seems to be backed up by press releases from Piaggio, Italian news stories, and trade journals.

I know all this sounds pretty negative, but itís really more of an effort to be sure that your eyes are open if you should choose a Guzzi. Personally, I love Moto Guzzis. I never really cared for the Ambassador or the Eldorado, but I fell in love with the V50 in the early 80s and have been a Moto Guzzi fan ever since. My 1200 Sport is a more fun than a barrel of monkeys and has been absolutely flawless. Based in part on my experience, my brother-in-law went out and bought a new, leftover í07 Griso about three weeks ago. He only has ~500 miles on it so far, but his too has been flawless.

For something a little more positive, I would also recommend this ( http://danilogurovich.wordpress.com/) blog by Danilo Gurovich. Heís a long-time Guzzi guy who recently replaced his wrecked 1200 Sport with a V7 Classic. Heís an admitted Guzzi guy, but he cross shopped the Bonnie and the Ducati 1000GT. Obviously, he ended up with the Goose. His blog helped me a lot in my decision to buy my 1200 Sport. I find that I get a lot more out of reading reviews from real riders and owners than I do from magazine or e-zine tests where some hotshoe spends a couple hours riding a bike from the press fleet.

Whatever you decide, good luck. In my opinion, either of the choices you listed is a winner.

47.wing
09-16-2009, 03:24 PM
+ Both of opinions above.

I ride a Guzzi Norge after many Hondas. The ride is great and is a good looking bike. It grows on you. However, it has its own little quirks. These have mostly worked themselves out.

wildebube
09-16-2009, 04:09 PM
+ Both of opinions above.

I ride a Guzzi Norge after many Hondas. The ride is great and is a good looking bike. It grows on you. However, it has its own little quirks. These have mostly worked themselves out.

And dealing with Mike and Todd is a real pleasure. MPH doesn't look too impressive, but they are one of the best dealers in the country. You're lucky to have them in Houston. I just wish I was a little closer. Well..., not really. What I really wish is that they were closer to me.

Alex74
09-16-2009, 05:55 PM
The Guzzi small block has been in production for close to 40 years and is well developed and well sorted. I havenít ridden a V7 Classic myself, but by all accounts itís a great bike and owners seem to love them. The non-C.A.R.C. shaft is solid. There were some problems with the early C.A.R.C. shafts on the big blocks, but those seem to have been resolved.

Moto Guzzi has a great sound and tons of character. Itís hard to describe, but itís much like Italian cars: thereís just something about them thatís different than anything else. Theyíre not necessarily smoother, faster, better handling, or anything else, but they somehow just manage to feel ďrightĒ and push all the right buttons. The V7C has gotten rave reviews from Guzzista Ė for whatever thatís worth.

Moto Guzzi is not without its issues though. Mechanically, they have a history of small problems that are usually fairly easy to fix, but troublesome just the same. Fuel pump issues on recent bikes are a good example. Iím not sure if the V7C is involved or not, but I know that there have been fuel pump problems with some recent Guzzis. The fuel pump is inside the tank and uses fuel line that is not alcohol resistant and is not adequately clamped to the pump. Consequently, here in the land of gasohol, the fuel lines swell and/or deteriorate, pop off of the pump, and leave you pumping fuel around the tank rather than to the injectors. Fairly easy to fix, but not something you should have to fix on a new motorcycle. These problems are exacerbated by a small dealer network and an even smaller good dealer network.

Take a look at this thread ( http://wildguzzi.com/forum/index.php?topic=27852.0) on wildguzzi for one horror story and some interesting quotes from Guzzi riders. Things like count on spending an additional 10% to finish the bike. Or maybe the first 20K miles can be frustrating, but the next 180K will be great. Like every other bike on the market, thereís a small percentage of them that really have problems, but those get a lot of attention.

Another issue is that Moto Guzzi seems to be perpetually on the ropes. Once again, they are in transition. On the verge of closing the doors for good in 2004, Moto Guzzi was bought by Aprilia. Then before too long Aprilia found themselves in trouble as well and they were recently bought by the Piaggio group. Right now it seems to be nearly impossible to get solid information on what is in the cards for Moto Guzzi. Piaggio has publicly stated that they intend to keep making Moto Guzzis, but they havenít said a lot more than that. There are also seemingly hundreds of stories floating around as to the future of the factory in Mandello. Some say itís closing, some say itís closed, and some say that it just shut down for the summer for the model changeover and is now back open. And each story seems to be backed up by press releases from Piaggio, Italian news stories, and trade journals.

I know all this sounds pretty negative, but itís really more of an effort to be sure that your eyes are open if you should choose a Guzzi. Personally, I love Moto Guzzis. I never really cared for the Ambassador or the Eldorado, but I fell in love with the V50 in the early 80s and have been a Moto Guzzi fan ever since. My 1200 Sport is a more fun than a barrel of monkeys and has been absolutely flawless. Based in part on my experience, my brother-in-law went out and bought a new, leftover í07 Griso about three weeks ago. He only has ~500 miles on it so far, but his too has been flawless.

For something a little more positive, I would also recommend this ( http://danilogurovich.wordpress.com/) blog by Danilo Gurovich. Heís a long-time Guzzi guy who recently replaced his wrecked 1200 Sport with a V7 Classic. Heís an admitted Guzzi guy, but he cross shopped the Bonnie and the Ducati 1000GT. Obviously, he ended up with the Goose. His blog helped me a lot in my decision to buy my 1200 Sport. I find that I get a lot more out of reading reviews from real riders and owners than I do from magazine or e-zine tests where some hotshoe spends a couple hours riding a bike from the press fleet.

Whatever you decide, good luck. In my opinion, either of the choices you listed is a winner.

WOW!!! Thanks for the information.

Alex74
09-16-2009, 06:40 PM
Can anyone share there Austin Moto Guzzi/Ducati dealer experience?

Jbay
09-16-2009, 06:44 PM
you could get the Bonnie and get aftermarket pipes

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JBE5zCwf4CE

kurt
09-16-2009, 06:59 PM
Can anyone share there Austin Moto Guzzi/Ducati dealer experience?

Mixed. The sales experience was just what you'd expect. After taking the keys, I walked to the parts counter and tried to purchase the parts and fluids to do the 600 mile service. I walked out with the gear oil for the transmission. No engine oil (rare viscosity requirement, 10W-60), no crush washers and no oil filter in stock. Since then I think they have begun to stock more parts for the then new 8 valve engine.

A couple of days later I found an online copy of a recall notice and called to find out if it applied to my bike. It did and they ordered the parts which took three weeks to come in. They then scheduled a service for the following Tuesday. Friday they began work and didn't finish until Wednesday.

While slow, they did want me to come in at the beginning for a free oil change to check for signs of metal flakes from the recalled cams. They again changed the oil as part of the recall and completed the TB synch since that was the only maintenance I had not yet performed. No charge for any of the extra stuff.

Overall, I give the dealership a "B". I think they genuinely care which is much more than I can say for some others. I'm also jaded by my experiences with LSBMW which I consider the gold standard.

Alex74
09-16-2009, 06:59 PM
you could get the Bonnie and get aftermarket pipes

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JBE5zCwf4CE

I really like the Bonnie. Those predators sound good. I wish I could hear them in person. I have a Hd Sporty and just put the stock exhaust back on because the Vance and Hines Straight Shot Slip Ons w/quiet baffles was TOO loud. The was an expensive lesson.

MikeB
09-16-2009, 07:16 PM
Guzzi are not for everyone, it takes a difference type of character to own one or more…..I am on my 3rd and still want more. :rider:
Texas Guzzi Rally is coming up, hopefully will see u there with the v7.

Alex74
09-16-2009, 07:28 PM
Mixed. The sales experience was just what you'd expect. After taking the keys, I walked to the parts counter and tried to purchase the parts and fluids to do the 600 mile service. I walked out with the gear oil for the transmission. No engine oil (rare viscosity requirement, 10W-60), no crush washers and no oil filter in stock. Since then I think they have begun to stock more parts for the then new 8 valve engine.

A couple of days later I found an online copy of a recall notice and called to find out if it applied to my bike. It did and they ordered the parts which took three weeks to come in. They then scheduled a service for the following Tuesday. Friday they began work and didn't finish until Wednesday.

While slow, they did want me to come in at the beginning for a free oil change to check for signs of metal flakes from the recalled cams. They again changed the oil as part of the recall and completed the TB synch since that was the only maintenance I had not yet performed. No charge for any of the extra stuff.

Overall, I give the dealership a "B". I think they genuinely care which is much more than I can say for some others. I'm also jaded by my experiences with LSBMW which I consider the gold standard.

Please do tell of the LSBMW experiences. I may go the Bonneville route.

kurt
09-16-2009, 07:38 PM
Do a search on Lone Star BMW and you'll find near universal satisfaction with their service, sales, accessories and staff. I've only owned BMW's, but I'm always amazed at what the stock in the way of parts.

Alex74
09-16-2009, 08:06 PM
The Guzzi small block has been in production for close to 40 years and is well developed and well sorted. I havenít ridden a V7 Classic myself, but by all accounts itís a great bike and owners seem to love them. The non-C.A.R.C. shaft is solid. There were some problems with the early C.A.R.C. shafts on the big blocks, but those seem to have been resolved.

Moto Guzzi has a great sound and tons of character. Itís hard to describe, but itís much like Italian cars: thereís just something about them thatís different than anything else. Theyíre not necessarily smoother, faster, better handling, or anything else, but they somehow just manage to feel ďrightĒ and push all the right buttons. The V7C has gotten rave reviews from Guzzista Ė for whatever thatís worth.

Moto Guzzi is not without its issues though. Mechanically, they have a history of small problems that are usually fairly easy to fix, but troublesome just the same. Fuel pump issues on recent bikes are a good example. Iím not sure if the V7C is involved or not, but I know that there have been fuel pump problems with some recent Guzzis. The fuel pump is inside the tank and uses fuel line that is not alcohol resistant and is not adequately clamped to the pump. Consequently, here in the land of gasohol, the fuel lines swell and/or deteriorate, pop off of the pump, and leave you pumping fuel around the tank rather than to the injectors. Fairly easy to fix, but not something you should have to fix on a new motorcycle. These problems are exacerbated by a small dealer network and an even smaller good dealer network.

Take a look at this thread ( http://wildguzzi.com/forum/index.php?topic=27852.0) on wildguzzi for one horror story and some interesting quotes from Guzzi riders. Things like count on spending an additional 10% to finish the bike. Or maybe the first 20K miles can be frustrating, but the next 180K will be great. Like every other bike on the market, thereís a small percentage of them that really have problems, but those get a lot of attention.

Another issue is that Moto Guzzi seems to be perpetually on the ropes. Once again, they are in transition. On the verge of closing the doors for good in 2004, Moto Guzzi was bought by Aprilia. Then before too long Aprilia found themselves in trouble as well and they were recently bought by the Piaggio group. Right now it seems to be nearly impossible to get solid information on what is in the cards for Moto Guzzi. Piaggio has publicly stated that they intend to keep making Moto Guzzis, but they havenít said a lot more than that. There are also seemingly hundreds of stories floating around as to the future of the factory in Mandello. Some say itís closing, some say itís closed, and some say that it just shut down for the summer for the model changeover and is now back open. And each story seems to be backed up by press releases from Piaggio, Italian news stories, and trade journals.

I know all this sounds pretty negative, but itís really more of an effort to be sure that your eyes are open if you should choose a Guzzi. Personally, I love Moto Guzzis. I never really cared for the Ambassador or the Eldorado, but I fell in love with the V50 in the early 80s and have been a Moto Guzzi fan ever since. My 1200 Sport is a more fun than a barrel of monkeys and has been absolutely flawless. Based in part on my experience, my brother-in-law went out and bought a new, leftover í07 Griso about three weeks ago. He only has ~500 miles on it so far, but his too has been flawless.

For something a little more positive, I would also recommend this ( http://danilogurovich.wordpress.com/) blog by Danilo Gurovich. Heís a long-time Guzzi guy who recently replaced his wrecked 1200 Sport with a V7 Classic. Heís an admitted Guzzi guy, but he cross shopped the Bonnie and the Ducati 1000GT. Obviously, he ended up with the Goose. His blog helped me a lot in my decision to buy my 1200 Sport. I find that I get a lot more out of reading reviews from real riders and owners than I do from magazine or e-zine tests where some hotshoe spends a couple hours riding a bike from the press fleet.

Whatever you decide, good luck. In my opinion, either of the choices you listed is a winner.

Read some of the Wild Guzzi thread. Don't know what to think. If the dealer is good and parts are available. I'm on the fence at this point. I am a nooby at wrenching. Do i want to wrench besides the noemal tune-up stuff? i guess I'm just talking to myself now. Decisions decisions.

kurt
09-16-2009, 08:08 PM
If you can change the oil, you have enough ability to maintain a Guzzi on your own. The valves couldn't be easier.

DaveC
09-17-2009, 12:21 AM
When I saw the Ural, I really liked it, the wife, not so much. I still have a secret need for the hack. Then I rode the Buell XB12, what a hoot, in fact I picked up a 2nd job to pay off my bills to afford one. Then I stopped by Ducati of Austin and there it was, all shiny and red, with those curvy lines and that V twin beat unlike any other. I'm liking that Norge, I looked at the silver and the black but they don't stir my passion like that red beauty. Yea, the Buell is still a favorite but the wife, eh not so much. She doesn't mind the Norge, I think it strikes her also. Next is to get her to test ride with me.:trust:
I would be on one but I bought that ATV :headbang: come to find out it cost $70 to take it some where and ride it. After you have one roll on top of you a couple of times, they lose the thrill.
Yes sir, That Norge , make mine red.

MikeB
09-17-2009, 10:24 AM
You are only 2 hrs away from one of the best Guzzi dealers in USÖ..if you ever needed, just saying.

If the dealer is good and parts are available. I'm on the fence at this point. I am a nooby at wrenching. Do i want to wrench besides the noemal tune-up stuff? i guess I'm just talking to myself now. Decisions decisions.

wildebube
09-17-2009, 10:56 AM
You are only 2 hrs away from one of the best Guzzi dealers in USÖ..if you ever needed, just saying.

+10000000000000

MPH is awesome.

I also agree with Kurt: if you can change the oil, you can probably maintain a Guzzi. Fluid changes, filter changes, and valve adjustments are all pretty easy. And I think the small block uses a more common oil than the 10W-60 specified for the big block. I'm too lazy to go look it up, but I think the small blocks call for 5W-40.

Guzzitech is a good source for step by step instructions for most maintenance tasks - many with pictures. You can also download the service manual from there.

kurt
09-17-2009, 10:57 AM
Only the new 8v motor requires 10W-60.

wildebube
09-17-2009, 11:07 AM
Only the new 8v motor requires 10W-60.

Not true. My 1200 Sport with the 2v engine calls for Agip Racing 4T 10w-60 synthetic. I also think that my brother-in-law's Griso 1100 calls for 10w-60. I may be wrong on the Griso though.

kurt
09-17-2009, 11:12 AM
Not true. My 1200 Sport with the 2v engine calls for Agip Racing 4T 10w-60 synthetic. I also think that my brother-in-law's Griso 1100 calls for 10w-60. I may be wrong on the Griso though.

Huh... learn something new every day. :doh:

wildebube
09-17-2009, 11:19 AM
According to today's news Piaggio is saying that Moto Guzzi will remain in Mandello del Lario. This isn't the greatest translation, but it gets the point across.

MILANO – The historical Moto Guzzi factory in Mandello del Lario, in the province of Lecco, will not close. This has been told by Roberto Colaninno, Piaggio Grup CEO, in announcing a meeting with the Unions on Sept. 22nd.

“ Our intention is to avoid the cassa integrazione ” declared Colaninno in reassuring workers after those alerting rumors that were circulating last weeks.

He said: “..it will remain the Guzzi’s factory and we will afford strong investments to achieve industrial and technological restructuring, for new models and for a new line of Moto Guzzi's products on which we are working. We rationalized the group”

kurt
09-17-2009, 12:04 PM
And how can you not like bikes made in a factory that looks like this?

http://static.blogo.it/twowheelsblog/Moto_Guzzi_Mandello_factory.jpg