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jiffy
02-13-2006, 02:52 AM
If I get antifreeze in my engine what is the best way to get it out. I haven't started it. Can I just change the oil and it be fine?

Tourmeister
02-13-2006, 02:55 AM
Where in the engine? In the cylinders? In the airbox? In the crankcase? Is it actually mixed in with the oil?

focus frenzy
02-13-2006, 03:48 AM
yes, where in the engine is it?
and how did it get there?
you will need to correct the problem if it is a mechanical issue you will need to correct that first.

assuming it was accidental, drain the oil and refill and also change the filter.
then with the majority of the coolant drained out, and fresh oil back in, you will need to ride the bike long enough to get the oil heated up real good.
a hour out on the highway should do the job, you need to get the oil hot enough that it will boil/cook the water out, if the bike has a oil cooler (oil cooled early GSXR's excluded) cover up the cooler with tin foil so the oil has a chance of getting hot enough.

kurt
02-13-2006, 07:14 AM
Assuming its mixed with the oil, and you accidentily put it there, I'd drain, refill, drain, refill, run, drain, refill and then run it for a few miles then drain and refill it again. You can use cheap oil for the flushing (new oil each drain and fill cycle), then the good stuff to finish off.

I put gear lube in the crankcase of my Harley by accident once. Luckily I caught it just as the jug emptied. Harley gives you three chances to mess something up. engine oil, transmission oil, and primary oil. :-P

Photojojo
02-13-2006, 07:37 AM
drain, refill, drain, refill, run, drain, refill and then run it for a few miles then drain and refill it again. You can use cheap oil for the flushing (new oil each drain and fill cycle), then the good stuff to finish off.



I agree

jiffy
02-13-2006, 11:04 AM
I took off the valve covers and the radiator hose let some antifreeze in the top of those valve covers into the engine casing.

CycleCat
02-13-2006, 11:14 AM
If you estimate it was just a quarter cup or less, it shold be no big deal. The best thing would be to drain the oil (the oil will float on top, so the antifreeze should come out first) and replace it. If the oil filter is the low spot of the ssystem, thre could be some there so I would change it. If the filter is not the lowest point, you could still change it but it's not so vital to do so. If any AF is left inside after that, you could be picky and run and flush it again, but some water from condensation on the inside of a motor is normal, and this is no worse. I would just run it and then leave the oil cap open while it's parked to let the moisture evaporate out. Do that a couple times and you should be fine.

Since you haven't run the bike and gotten the AF into all the bearings, I wouldn't worry about it too much.

mhutch
02-13-2006, 11:37 AM
If you run a bike with antifreeze in the oil it turns baby crap brown. You will know if there is any left in the engine once you turn it on. Just keep your eye on the sight glass on the side of the engine and turn it off if it starts to turn a funny color. This, of course, should not be done until you change the oil at least once.....

jiffy
02-13-2006, 01:05 PM
Thanks for all the replies. I will change the oil and filter, run it, and change again for safety sake.

dennis
02-13-2006, 01:18 PM
Not familar with your model bike but, does it have a CAT in the exhaust or an oxygen sensor? If so, coolant will damage both irrepairably. So, if your engine is so equipped, do not run it. Flush it with ATF (ATF has the ability to take up water and carry it out when drained). Refill with ATF, change the filter and run it at low speeds. Drain the ATF and refill with cheap oil, changing the filter again. Run it to operating temperature and drop the hot oil. If you see no evidence of wet oil, refill with the usual brand and viscosity.

Remember, if the CAT or oxygen sensor (if so equipped) see any coolant, your engine will not run correctly after the oxygen sensor sees the coolant additives. If you have no oxygen sensor or CAT, merely flush once with ATF then refill with your oil of choice and change the filter. To be sure, I would change the oil again after a few hundred miles. Rust and acids will form if there is wet oil in the engine.

JR
02-13-2006, 01:47 PM
Not familar with your model bike but, does it have a CAT in the exhaust or an oxygen sensor? If so, coolant will damage both irrepairably. So, if your engine is so equipped, do not run it. Flush it with ATF (ATF has the ability to take up water and carry it out when drained). Refill with ATF, change the filter and run it at low speeds. Drain the ATF and refill with cheap oil, changing the filter again. Run it to operating temperature and drop the hot oil. If you see no evidence of wet oil, refill with the usual brand and viscosity.

Remember, if the CAT or oxygen sensor (if so equipped) see any coolant, your engine will not run correctly after the oxygen sensor sees the coolant additives. If you have no oxygen sensor or CAT, merely flush once with ATF then refill with your oil of choice and change the filter. To be sure, I would change the oil again after a few hundred miles. Rust and acids will form if there is wet oil in the engine.

GOOD ADVICE. Don't know what all bikes have CATs..., Honda ST1300 does have the full compliment of CARB pleasers including CATS in both mufflers.... DON'T TAKE ANY CHANCES. Multiple oil/filter changes are less expensive than replacing O2 sensors and CATS.

JR aka Grumpy
STOC # 394
03ST1300ABS
Lake Livingston, TX

dennis
02-13-2006, 05:42 PM
GOOD ADVICE. Don't know what all bikes have CATs..., Honda ST1300 does have the full compliment of CARB pleasers including CATS in both mufflers.... DON'T TAKE ANY CHANCES. Multiple oil/filter changes are less expensive than replacing O2 sensors and CATS.

JR aka Grumpy
STOC # 394
03ST1300ABS
Lake Livingston, TX


And Grumpy should know...look where he lives.........in a lake...

Coolant contains silicates which will kill the oxygen sensor. If there is even a small amount of coolant in the oil, it will work up into the combustion chambers and be spit out the exhaust system and.....BINGO......your oxygen sensor is dead. Then, the ECU will default to the rich setting resulting in poor running and drivability problems. Just don't take the chance...and BTW, using ATF will provide adequate lubrication while you are purging the engine of coolant, even running the engine for 10 or 20 minutes. Also, any residual left behind will do no harm. Also, seals and gaskets like ATF, a comfort if there has been coolant and water inside the engine.

I use ATF routinely to flush my BMW engine, transmission and rear drive. It is very high in detergents and so carries away any junk when it is drained. It won't harm a wet clutch.

Flush away…….