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Old 03-07-2012, 08:47 PM   #41
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Re: What To Do? A KLR Quandary.

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The dry weight is at 185kg or 407lbs, while its real-life weight is measured at 210kg or 462lbs.
RB
That's very interesting. I just double-checked the Aug 2011 issue of Motorcycle Consumer News (MCN) where they compared the 800GS to the Tiger 800XC. They reported wet weights of 489 and 503 respectively. MCN weighs every bike they test in a ready-to-ride state because the manufacturers are notorious for lying about the true weight of motorcycles.

There is a 27 lb difference between what MCN reports and what WebBikeWorld reports - and 27 lbs is a pretty big difference. Perhaps the difference is found in the amount of fuel in the bike when measured.

As a point of comparison MCN reports 409 lbs for first generation model KLR and 428 lbs for the 2nd gen version.

http://texasadventure.net/bikes-and-...re-motorcycles
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Old 03-07-2012, 08:59 PM   #42
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There is a 27 lb difference between what MCN reports and what WebBikeWorld reports - and 27 lbs is a pretty big difference. Perhaps the difference is found in the amount of fuel in the bike when measured.

As a point of comparison MCN reports 409 lbs for first generation model KLR and 428 lbs for the 2nd gen version.

http://texasadventure.net/bikes-and-...re-motorcycles
MCL weight calculation seem to fluctuate a bit especially when they are stepping on each other's toes and trying to have the marketing upper hand.

When fully loaded, farkled ready for class 1-2 roads and general light touring duty, the little extra weight won't matter much. I think also having a better power to weight ratio is more desirable than a slightly lesser weight and a noticeable less power to weight ratio.

Let's not forget the pleasures of fuel injection.



As for Phillip's quandary, I think his second generation would be better sold and as an alternative acquiring the 800GS for better off-road riding performance and extended highway duty. Of course, if he decides to exclusively trailer, then lower cc thumper would be a more suitable choice. If Phillip is under a very tight budget, then a first generation KLR with perhaps a 690 cc engine mod etc. would be a prudent alternative.

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Old 03-07-2012, 09:07 PM   #43
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Re: What To Do? A KLR Quandary.

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Originally Posted by Red Brown;985788When fully loaded, farkled ready for class 1-2 roads and general light touring duty, the little extra weight won't matter much. I think also having a better power to weight ratio is[B
more desirable[/b] than a slightly lesser weight and a noticeable less power to weight ratio.

RB
Please don't take my earlier posts the wrong way - I agree with what you've said here. I just thought readers would benefit from knowing that the 800GS is 50-80 lbs heavier than a KLR (depending on which KLR you are comparing it to and which reported 800GS weight you choose to use).
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Old 03-07-2012, 09:14 PM   #44
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Please don't take my earlier posts the wrong way - I agree with what you've said here. I just thought readers would benefit from knowing that the 800GS is 50-80 lbs heavier than a KLR (depending on which KLR you are comparing it to and which reported 800GS weight you choose to you).
Yes, I was working from Phillip's plight regarding his second generation which is indeed as you mentioned heavier than the previous version. As you know the consideration for selecting the proper dual-sport bike - one that will get both extended off-road and road use - requires more than just considering mere weight as a deciding factor.

For me, the power to weight ratio is important, especially in terms of being able to off-set the extra weight the bike might have. The Dakar KTM 900 cc series bike did quite well in really severe terrain.

Lookin' forward to more Texas Adventure sponsored events.



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Old 03-07-2012, 09:20 PM   #45
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Re: What To Do? A KLR Quandary.

Red,

I agree with you. I would also add that suspension has a big impact on performance. It seems to me that the better suspension on the 800GS or the KTM 950/990 series plus the better power-to-weight ratio of those bikes go a long way toward negating their significantly heavier overall weight.
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Old 03-07-2012, 09:34 PM   #46
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Re: What To Do? A KLR Quandary.

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Red,

I agree with you. I would also add that suspension has a big impact on performance. It seems to me that the better suspension on the 800GS or the KTM 950/990 series plus the better power-to-weight ratio of those bikes go a long way toward negating their significantly heavier overall weight.
...o yea...integrated high-end suspension with a steering damper makes a profound difference, especially on those bumpy roads. That is one of strong points about the KTM line.

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Old 03-07-2012, 09:45 PM   #47
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Re: What To Do? A KLR Quandary.

Hmmm, if you guys that say more power to weight ratio is always a good thing no matter what, I will let you ride my YZ. At 210lbs and 47hp it will wear you out in a few miles just trying to contain it.

For me there is a good balance and the KLR isn't too bad for stuff like what you find in Big Bend. Granted I grew up riding big, overweight thumpers so riding a KLR is second nature. For newbies to dirt or offroad it may not be the right thing. But I can also say with really good certainty that a 990 Adventure is also not the right thing. Tons of power, and a lot of weight to muscle around isn't really a good thing unless you know what you are doing. David (Cagiva) makes it look easy because he is one heck of a talented rider.
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Old 03-07-2012, 09:55 PM   #48
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Re: What To Do? A KLR Quandary.

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No, not quite...I have the 650GS which is a little over 400 pounds. I had a KLR when I first started riding about six years ago. I enjoyed it..but eventually traded up for a WR which was much more sufficient for my needs at the time. I sold the WR with almost 9K on the clock. I do miss it, but for average central Texas dual-sport riding, the 650GS is more versatile, especially long-hours on the tarmac getting to and from the local dual-sport roads....

When the 800GS came out it was replete with many recalls. The new 800GS seem to be much better in terms of first generation issues BMW is known for. Also the rear shock mount is quite week on the 800GS and several have reported bent shock mounts as a result. Some dude sells and aftermarket kit that strengthens the 800GS design flaw in the shock mounting system.

I have test ridden the 800GS.

RB
So I must ask.. if you only have a test ride under you on the 800, how do you know the extra power makes it easier to power through rocks and sand? I'm really not trying to be argumentative here, but genuinely curious. As having ridden offroad most of my life on quite a sampling of bikes from really low power to HP fireballs, after X amount of power you really don't need anymore to "power through" sand. And having taken the KLR through quite a bit of it, the only thing I am wishing for is lighter weight. I've never found myself in deep sand wishing for more power because I've got it rung out and it just won't go anymore.

The lighter weight thing I wish for almost every time though. And it isn't a power to weight ratio, it is just a weight issue. And if we want to go into the rocks, you really need even less power than the sand because going wide open even on a pig like the KLR in loose rocks just makes a mess and gets the back wheel dancing about.

Again, not trying to argue but just trying to figure out what I've been missing all these years by not buying into what I consider manufacturers hype.

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Well, I have to say the 800GS carries it's weight pretty well. The 82 HP makes a huge difference in being able to power through the sand and rock compared to the KLR - more favorable power to weight ratio and superior suspension.
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Old 03-07-2012, 10:18 PM   #49
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Re: What To Do? A KLR Quandary.

hmmm


touring
track racing
canyon carving
day rides
commuting
adventure touring
dual sport
trail riding
cross country racing
motocross

sound like you know the KLR as good as anybody, get a KTM 500 exc and a trailer
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Old 03-07-2012, 10:21 PM   #50
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Re: What To Do? A KLR Quandary.

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Here's what I like about my KLR:
- low seat hight (I have a 30" inseam)
- somewhat lightweight (I'm 165lbs)
- nice off road manners
- cheap, reliable & easy to maintain
Don't think I EVER heard the KLR described as "light weight". It has GOT to be the heaviest DP bike EVER sold. I guess that's a relative thing if you think a BMW GS is a DP bike. I don't delude myself that the KLR is a great dirt bike. No, a CRF450F is a decent dirt bike, but I can't ride a CRF450F 300 miles on the highway. Even a XR650L can't lay claim to the KLR's comfort on the highway. The KLR is a comfy dual sport. As an adventure tourer, it's light and underpowered, but not as a dual sport. As a dual sport, it's heavy, it's a pig, but it does have it's uses both on and off the pavement. It ain't a cow trailer, though. But, ridden well, it can go off road so long as it don't get ridiculous. The roads in Big Bend I've done on a R5 Yamaha street bike. That's not tough off roading IMHO. That is well within the KLR's capabilities.
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Old 03-07-2012, 11:55 PM   #51
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Re: What To Do? A KLR Quandary.

Buy a different bike. Preferably one designed in the last two decades. A Versys/WeeStrom with knobbies will prolly get you anywhere a KLR will and work better on the highway, too. If you want something more dirt oriented, visit a KTM or Husky dealer. They both offer motorcycles light years ahead of the KLR for less than $9k.

I had a first gen for a couple years. I commuted on it daily and did a bunch of off road i prolly shouldn't have. It was fun riding, but i can't say the bike is any good. It's heavy, has crappy brakes, and the suspension is not very good. There was two things that was good about the bike: cheap and it had a big gas tank. If the DR and XRL came with a big tank stock, i think Kawasaki would lose a lot of sales.

Now with gen 2, they fixed the brakes and the suspension is better. However, it's still heavy and they went and dolled it up so much dropping it off road will burn up any money you saved buying a cheap bike. Plus, after 30 years of the same engine they still didn't get the Doohickey quite right, but they found a way to make some burn oil. Nice.

I can understand why people like them. They're cheap and get the job done. Sorta like stuff made in China, but i don't think it's a good value.

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Old 03-08-2012, 12:25 AM   #52
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Versys/WeeStrom with knobbies will prolly get you anywhere a KLR will and work better on the highway, too. .
Was about to post that. Engine guard and flush mount signals are a requirement for any DS. As many have noted though, skill will carry you much further than the machine ever can. Maybe get a cheap light bike to work on rider skill before pushing it with a bigger bike

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Old 03-08-2012, 06:38 AM   #53
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Re: What To Do? A KLR Quandary.

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Buy a different bike. Preferably one designed in the last two decades. A Versys/WeeStrom with knobbies will prolly get you anywhere a KLR will and work better on the highway, too. If you want something more dirt oriented, visit a KTM or Husky dealer. They both offer motorcycles light years ahead of the KLR for less than $9k.
This is the whole quandary though. My Wife owns a Versys, and I own a Strom (albeit a 1000 not a 650) and neither one will TOUCH a KLR in the dirt. So when you get better road manners you will lose dirt prowess. The same when you buy the new, cool looking KTM or Husky. They are much better than the KLR in the dirt but can't touch it on the street.

Nevermind.... just go buy something, that'll fix all your problems.
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Old 03-08-2012, 08:35 AM   #54
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Re: What To Do? A KLR Quandary.

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So I must ask.. if you only have a test ride under you on the 800, how do you know the extra power makes it easier to power through rocks and sand?
I have ridden the 800 off-road. BTW, the 650GS I have has the 800 cc engine slightly detuned but with more low end pull than the 800. I have gone over similar roads that are sand and rocks and really feel the benefit of more HP at the rear, especially loaded with gear, water etc. compared to lesser powered bikes I have used. I would like a steering damper eventually.

BMW classifies the F650GS as a 650cc for European certification reason, when actually it has a 800 cc hiding under the skin.



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Old 03-08-2012, 08:54 AM   #55
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Re: What To Do? A KLR Quandary.

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This is the whole quandary though. My Wife owns a Versys, and I own a Strom (albeit a 1000 not a 650) and neither one will TOUCH a KLR in the dirt. So when you get better road manners you will lose dirt prowess. The same when you buy the new, cool looking KTM or Husky. They are much better than the KLR in the dirt but can't touch it on the street.

Nevermind.... just go buy something, that'll fix all your problems.
When I was thinkin' Versys, I wanted something more off road capable, why I didn't get the Versys. Of course, I still have my 01 SV which still runs great and gives me a bit more on road prowess. I have the suspension pretty close on it except for the stock shock which doesn't bother me. I don't race the thing, just a street bike.

As I've aged, my requirements for power have mellowed. I do like a light weight off road motorcycle, have tons of fun on stuff like little TTR125s and such even though over any sort of jump, my fat butt bottoms the suspension, don't have to be the latest MX terror, prefer it NOT be in fact. BUT, with the KLR, I wanted good street/highway comfort, easy speed limit cruising, and ability to get down a muddy road if needed down at my place. I won't take it out IN the place away from the "road" (that's a liberal use of the word "road".. ) like I will the 200, but I can make it down that road even in the wet, which since I sold my 4x4 Toyota, is a good thing. I'm lookin' to sell that place, have it on the market, and am planning to buy land and a house up around Rocksprings to spend my last waning years, but I'll keep the KLR anyway, and, up there, OF COURSE the SV. The roads up there actually have CURVES in 'em. I could probably sell both bikes and buy a Versys since the land up there doesn't seem to have any actual SOIL, just rocks, but I think I like having more focused rides, less "all around". As you say, you give up one area, you gain in another. It's all in where in the compromise spectrum you feel the most comfortable with the bike. Besides, that cheap Chinese 200 is still running, even if most of the bodywork is cracked and wasted. I don't really play ride in the dirt much, anymore, but that one is good 'nuf for it if I want to. Heck, that thing is 7 years old, now and is designed after something from the early 80s at best. But, it's still fun and capable as far as I am going to push it.

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They both offer motorcycles light years ahead of the KLR for less than $9k.
OOOPS, I'm out!!!!! Not nearly worth it to ME. To each his own with his discretionary income. Me, I really don't have much of that. I see the rest of my life with USED Japanese motorcycles, not that I can't be happy with that. Actually, part of the highway allure of the KLR is its 50+ mpg now that gas prices are going out of sight.
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Old 03-08-2012, 09:06 AM   #56
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Re: What To Do? A KLR Quandary.

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...It seems to me that the better suspension on the 800GS or the KTM 950/990 series plus the better power-to-weight ratio of those bikes go a long way toward negating their significantly heavier overall weight.
Except no negating any of that weight when you're picking them up off the ground alone.

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Old 03-08-2012, 09:18 AM   #57
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Re: What To Do? A KLR Quandary.

You know, I've found that by staying away from motorcycle magazines, both online and in print, I don't have NEAR the new bike cravings I once had. Heck, I don't even know all the models available, anymore.... But, I'm happier with what I've got, put it that way.
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Old 03-08-2012, 09:21 AM   #58
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Except no negating any of that weight when you're picking them up off the ground alone.

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Old 03-08-2012, 10:32 AM   #59
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Re: What To Do? A KLR Quandary.

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...even a grandma can pick up a fallen Goldwing!

Picking up a fallen Goldwing - YouTube

The morale of the story is don't fall if possible.
Sure under ideal circumstances. Now have Grandma or even a bodybuilder try that in a mud hole or in deep sand. Not that easy. My old gen DR650 probably tips the scales at over 400lbs fully loaded. By the third time I picked that bike up in the dirt I was spent for the day. It is a compounding issue, go down once and then getting it back up tires you out some making you ride sloppier and easier to crash the next time, rinse and repeat until your lucky to get the bike back upright again. Now this is talking about riding single track like SHNF which beats you up quite a bit more on a big bike than the type of riding at BB and such.

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Old 03-08-2012, 10:32 AM   #60
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Re: What To Do? A KLR Quandary.

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Except no negating any of that weight when you're picking them up off the ground alone.

_
Well, yes, except for that part. My strategy is to always try to ride with some big fellows, like Big A, so they can pick my bike up for me when I crash.

I know even Grandma can pick up a Gold Wing that has fallen over in parking lot. The challenge is I never seem to crash in a parking lot. I always seem to fall over on the side of some steep, knarly hill. The bike ends up upside down and I can't find any decent footing to leverage it up by myself.
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