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2000 Yamaha Road Star V1600 - Sparks but won't start (updated)

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Hey folks, been a while!

Came back to tweak my post because after some reading I realized I was testing the sparkplug wrong - IE just holding it up to the air and it didn't spark, but put it next to the cylinder head and it sparks.

That being said.. the spark is happening but the engine still won't start. Seems like this could be a stator/pickup coil problem?

Thanks in advance - I miss the pie rides!
 
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Joined
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Norman
If there is spark, I'd be looking on the fuel side.
Is it fuel injected or carburetors?
Carbs. And fuel related it did have some very old gas in it - about 1/4 tank - that I added to about 2/3 tank with new gas. I figured that might be part of the reason why the plugs were so nasty. But I'm fairly certain the fuel is definitely getting there, when you turn the engine over long enough you can smell fumes from it getting moved through the system without igniting. Though I suppose if there's enough gummed up gas in the lines it might just be too little making it per cycle to ignite and crank the engine? How do I check and/or resolve this?
 
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It's a fuel issue. Carbs probably just need a cleaning.

Where are you located?
 
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Clean out the fuel system and carb and try fresh alcohol free gas.
Yep - gonna take a crack at the carb today I hate to dispose of a bunch of fuel since I just added a decent amount to the tank recently but if it's water spoiled there's really nothing to do for it. I suppose I could put it in a clear jug/pitcher or something and try to get rid of the water/ethanol part.
 

RTL

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The Road Star has a single carb and it is easy to work on. There is a great step by step video on YouTube of carb tear down and cleaning.
 
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Just north of Bastrop. I've been looking up some info on how to get the carb off/out. Doesn't seem too bad, think I'll give it a try.
Should be easy to get it on and off. As stated I'm sure there is a decent video on how to tear down that specific carb and clean it. I've recently taken to using an ultra sonic cleaner(harbor freight) to clean carbs).

If you need any help let me know. Once it cools off I could be persuaded to ride out that way
 
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Progress! (I think/hope, anyway)

I pulled off the air filter so I could look at the carb. It's pretty dang clean (but I know that doesn't mean much), and I disconnected the fuel line so I could start working on removing it..

Dry as a bone. I've been trying to turn this engine over for a few hours all told between days of working on it - even if it was water-contaminated I would have expected SOMETHING to be in the line, and all the guides I've seen on how to remove the carb warn you that there may be some gas in the line still. It's not just that there wasn't any, it smelled like dry/empty rubber, no hint of fuel fumes or anything.

I sprayed some starter fluid in the carb and she turned over nice and easy - so at least the ignition side seems to be good. Definitely a fuel side problem.

I pulled off the cover where the fuel filter is hidden, and there's definitely liquid in it, but with no gas actually moving through the system what's my next point of check - fuel pump? blocked line somewhere?
 
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Progress! (I think/hope, anyway)

I pulled off the air filter so I could look at the carb. It's pretty dang clean (but I know that doesn't mean much), and I disconnected the fuel line so I could start working on removing it..

Dry as a bone. I've been trying to turn this engine over for a few hours all told between days of working on it - even if it was water-contaminated I would have expected SOMETHING to be in the line, and all the guides I've seen on how to remove the carb warn you that there may be some gas in the line still. It's not just that there wasn't any, it smelled like dry/empty rubber, no hint of fuel fumes or anything.

I sprayed some starter fluid in the carb and she turned over nice and easy - so at least the ignition side seems to be good. Definitely a fuel side problem.

I pulled off the cover where the fuel filter is hidden, and there's definitely liquid in it, but with no gas actually moving through the system what's my next point of check - fuel pump? blocked line somewhere?
I had a problem with my lawnmower awhile back where the sleeve inside the fuel line came apart and blocked the flow of fuel.

I'd go ahead and replace all the line. If the bike does have a fuel pump, just point the fuel line into a bucket and crank the bike. No fuel=pump issue
A quick Google tells me those pumps are prone to failure
 
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I had a problem with my lawnmower awhile back where the sleeve inside the fuel line came apart and blocked the flow of fuel.

I'd go ahead and replace all the line. If the bike does have a fuel pump, just point the fuel line into a bucket and crank the bike. No fuel=pump issue
A quick Google tells me those pumps are prone to failure
Bummer, that's what I was afraid of. I did put my thumb over the fuel line at the carb when I disconnected it and turned the engine - zero pressure or sense of flow, but I wasn't sure if there was anything to push it or if the carb/vacuum of the cylinders pulled it.

Is there a way to test the pump before going all-in on purchasing a replacement? IE validate it's the pump that failed and not the wiring leading to it.
 
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Bummer, that's what I was afraid of. I did put my thumb over the fuel line at the carb when I disconnected it and turned the engine - zero pressure or sense of flow, but I wasn't sure if there was anything to push it or if the carb/vacuum of the cylinders pulled it.

Is there a way to test the pump before going all-in on purchasing a replacement? IE validate it's the pump that failed and not the wiring leading to it.
You could pull the fuel pump and visually inspect the connections.

Looks like fuel pumps range from $30-70
 
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You could pull the fuel pump and visually inspect the connections.

Looks like fuel pumps range from $30-70
I was actually gonna ask about that - the actual yamaha pump is $150-175, and I'm finding stuff online for the price you mention. Kinda makes me skeptical but I can't knock a good price.
 
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I was actually gonna ask about that - the actual yamaha pump is $150-175, and I'm finding stuff online for the price you mention. Kinda makes me skeptical but I can't knock a good price.
As long as it says it replaces the yamaha part number you are good to go.

The oem price is mostly profit I'm sure
 

RTL

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That bike doesn't need the fuel pump. Again the Road Star Clinic forum is your friend on how to go "pumpless".
 
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I had seen that, and while it might be a good alternative but it's $125 more than an OEM yamaha fuel pump and about $225 more than a 3rd party pump, and right now the goal is just economical repairs.

Although now I'm torn, because a cheap fuel pump is likely to need replacing at some point in the future and a pumpless feature should be a one time only thing.
 
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I had seen that, and while it might be a good alternative but it's $125 more than an OEM yamaha fuel pump and about $225 more than a 3rd party pump, and right now the goal is just economical repairs.

Although now I'm torn, because a cheap fuel pump is likely to need replacing at some point in the future and a pumpless feature should be a one time only thing.
I understand that. I'd do the same thing. I'm cheap
 

RTL

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You do not need that expensive kit to go pumpless! For the last time if you would spend a little time searching the Road Star Clinic site it has a very cheap alternative to the fuel pump or pump elimination kit. Or PM me and I’ll give you my phone number and explain it to you. Did this to my Road Star a couple of years ago and haven’t looked back.
 
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You do not need that expensive kit to go pumpless! For the last time if you would spend a little time searching the Road Star Clinic site it has a very cheap alternative to the fuel pump or pump elimination kit. Or PM me and I’ll give you my phone number and explain it to you. Did this to my Road Star a couple of years ago and haven’t looked back.

I imagine you are referring to this article? https://www.roadstarclinic.com/articles/carb-manifold-airkit/stock-carburetor/5249-change-the-float-bowl-needle-valve-and-lose-your-fuel-pump

I took a look at it but have a question and some hesitation.

1 - Given that the motorcycle has had no other modifications, that 2C6-14190-30-00 3mm valve/needle is all that I need? really? No change to larger volume/high-flow petcock? No other supplementary parts?
2 - the instruction to remove the mesh filter from the line concerns me, isn't that to keep any sort of debris large enough to clog your jets or damage your engine out?
3 - comment about the fuel line possibly melting also makes me nervous but at least that can be mitigated by things like insulating tape or other such things.
 

RTL

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The stock petcock flows enough for my 06 1700 to run at full throttle longer than I have courage to.
Road Star Clinic offers advice on a cheap inline filter that is easier to service and less restrictive than the tiny screen. I did mine with good quality ethanol resistant fuel hose and two years and thousands of miles later it is still going strong. Just take care of how you route it and reuse the Yamaha hose protection spring.
 
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The stock petcock flows enough for my 06 1700 to run at full throttle longer than I have courage to.
Road Star Clinic offers advice on a cheap inline filter that is easier to service and less restrictive than the tiny screen. I did mine with good quality ethanol resistant fuel hose and two years and thousands of miles later it is still going strong. Just take care of how you route it and reuse the Yamaha hose protection spring.
Do you have a reference link to the inline filter? Or the ethanol resistant fuel hose? Thanks in advance
 

RTL

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Auto parts store can provide the hose and filter or you can search Road Star Clinic for it like I did ywo years back.
 
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