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HOUSTON: 2004 BMW R1150GS $3,000

grandelatte

Consistently Inconsistent
Forum Supporter
Joined
Jul 18, 2006
Messages
231
Location
League City
First Name
Jim
2004 BMW R1150GS for sale - I am moving and I need to scale down my collection of bikes. I bought this bike in September 2017 with 27,000 miles. Now it has ~51,000 miles. I still ride it every day so the mileage will increase. This is a dual spark model.

$3,000
Located in League City - Southeast suburb of Houston

It has the followings.
BMW crash bars
Jesse bags with liners
Spiegler brake and clutch lines
Driving lights with autoswitch (long hold the blinker cancellation button to turn on or off)
Odyssey battery
Metal fuel quick disconnects
Touratech rack extension
Touratech headlight shield
Sidestand bigfoot
Alaska Leather seat pad
Powerlet plugs
Fastway footpegs
GIVI trunk (top case)
Spare Spark plugs
Brake bleeding funnel
Owners manuals
JVB Maintenance DVD/CD
Brand new Shinko 705s
New front & rear brake pads with EBC HH pads.

Oil and filter, valve checks, throttle body sync done religiously every 6000 miles. Next maintenance should be done at 54,000 miles. The hydraulic fluid, brakes, and clutch, was flushed once a year. The bike has been always garaged at home. It is a great bike on and off road. It has been down a few times during off-road trips and training. It has never been down on a hardtop while I owned the bike.

History - for what I know
I have been told that this bike was owned by an owner of a local motorcycle shop. Then it has gone two other owners before arriving at my previous owner. So I am the fifth owner of this bike. That’s the story I was told when I bought the bike.

The story I was not told but found out later was…. The bike was in an accident. I heard that it was repaired at a reputable shop. They did a great job fixing it. I could not tell that the bike was in an accident.

A few issues for the buyer to know
Around 49,000 miles, the tank paint started to bubble. This is under the tank emblem on the right side. I have not repaired this yet. I showed a picture to a motorcycle painter. He thinks there may be a small fuel leak from the previous repair. He was certain that he can fix it. I have not had time to take the tank to him.

About the same time, the red triangle indicator started to come on occasionally. As I have looked into this on the manual, it says the rear light bulb is out. But it is not. So there is some electrical gremlin. <= This has not come up since I removed the relayed accessory circuit.
Also, when you ride in heavy rain, the gear indicator will not show the correct gear. But if you are a fair weather rider, this will not be an issue.

Due to these issues, I am pricing this bike at $3,000.00. I hope this is fair.

You can call me or text me at 281.620.5703.

Jim

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Tank Bubble =(
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grandelatte

Consistently Inconsistent
Forum Supporter
Joined
Jul 18, 2006
Messages
231
Location
League City
First Name
Jim
Update
Just installed new Shinko 705s - front & rear.
Installed new rear brake pads - will be installing the front pads this week.

Still riding it almost daily.

The tail light bulb warning light has not come on since I removed the relayed accessory circuit.
 

Tourmeister

Keeper of the Asylum
Admin
Joined
Feb 28, 2003
Messages
46,390
Location
Huntsville
First Name
Scott
Last Name
Friday
I've spent the last few nights working on my 17 R1200GS and it is REALLY making me miss the simplicity of working on the 1150 GS! :headbang:

Removing the tank on these 1150s involves removing one bolt at the rear of the tank and disconnecting two quick disconnect joints for the fuel lines. On the new bike, you spend a LOT of time removing little screws and clips that hold all the fairing/plastic bits before you can even get to the actual fuel tank or air filter. Then you have to keep track of them, remember what goes where, and try to get it all back together again. Crazy. It definitely would not be fun trying to work on the newer bikes on the side of the road during a trip if the need were to arise!
 

grandelatte

Consistently Inconsistent
Forum Supporter
Joined
Jul 18, 2006
Messages
231
Location
League City
First Name
Jim
I've spent the last few nights working on my 17 R1200GS and it is REALLY making me miss the simplicity of working on the 1150 GS! :headbang:

Removing the tank on these 1150s involves removing one bolt at the rear of the tank and disconnecting two quick disconnect joints for the fuel lines. On the new bike, you spend a LOT of time removing little screws and clips that hold all the fairing/plastic bits before you can even get to the actual fuel tank or air filter. Then you have to keep track of them, remember what goes where, and try to get it all back together again. Crazy. It definitely would not be fun trying to work on the newer bikes on the side of the road during a trip if the need were to arise!
Scott! what are you doing, dang it! Are you trying to convince me to keep the old girl? If so, you are doing a great job.

If you are trying to tell everyone how GREAT 115GS is, then again, you are doing a good job. Thanks for your endorsement. Yes, removing tank is so easy to do. There are so many things that are just plain simple. I have no experience with the wet heads, but it sounds like lots of little annoyances. I'm sure I will eventually get there.

=)

Jim
 

Tourmeister

Keeper of the Asylum
Admin
Joined
Feb 28, 2003
Messages
46,390
Location
Huntsville
First Name
Scott
Last Name
Friday
Scott! what are you doing, dang it! Are you trying to convince me to keep the old girl? If so, you are doing a great job.

If you are trying to tell everyone how GREAT 115GS is, then again, you are doing a good job. Thanks for your endorsement. Yes, removing tank is so easy to do. There are so many things that are just plain simple. I have no experience with the wet heads, but it sounds like lots of little annoyances. I'm sure I will eventually get there.

=)

Jim
The 1150s ARE great bikes. I put about 30K miles on mine in about 1-1/2 years before adding kids to the family required me to sell it :-P They have their own special quirks, but I didn't find any of them to be especially annoying or troublesome. For anyone that wants to do their own maintenance, they are definitely easier to maintain than the newer 1200s (or even the early 1200s). I think they also do a better job of quickly floating down nasty bumpy back roads. The extra weight makes them more stable and they ride smoother. The heavier flywheel on the motor also makes it less sensitive to the small throttle inputs you cannot help but make as you are bumping along and holding onto the bike. Don't get me wrong, I love the new bikes as well, but it is not necessarily a case of everything about the new bikes being better than the old bikes!
 
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