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2017 MexTrek #6, Oct 26th to 29th 2017

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Survey on riding gear choice and rationale from you Galeana Gurus.

I'd trying to decide between motocross/enduro clothing and ADV clothing or mix/match. I'm riding the KTM 500 EXC. I do NOT have a windscreen on my KTM because my GPS mount interferes with a screen plus my handlebars are full of stuff. I have a full complement of MC clothing to choose from (ask my wife), so it's not a matter of buying anything.

- ADV or dirt helmet? ADV has better wind/rain protection and better visibility in traffic vs goggles; dirt = much better ventilation, and can wear glasses vs goggles for better visibility in traffic provided weather is good.
- If motocross/enduro chest protector, hard or soft armor?
- If motocross, jacket and pants: Ventilated with a separate rain/wind shell, or non-ventilated? Colder mornings vs working hard up on the pegs in the sun in the afternoon?
- Motocross or ADV boots?
Mix and matching? ADV jacket and pant with moto armor and knee braces? Or what? Why?

Thanks, Trekers!
 
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Joined
Oct 14, 2014
Messages
235
Location
San Antonio, TX
This post is for people who need or want to get their vehicle permit and pay for the tourist visa before crossing the border, and especially for those who want to obtain the TVIP in Austin.

I'm no expert, I'm just sharing my experience to help you if you're interested.

SUMMARY:
Today I got the TVIP at the Banjercito inside the consulate in Austin, and completed a form and paid for the tourist visa online. :deal:
The formal name of the document is "Permiso de Importacion Temporal de Vehiculos."

DETAILS:

I showed up at the appointed time and the security guard came running over to help me the moment I walked in and told me I didn't need an appointment (despite what I had been told earlier and read online but maybe they were just being nice and I was wearing a suit as I do every day at work -- so IDK). You can obviously decide if you want to make an appointment or not.

At the consulate counter three people (two of whom were supervisors) informed me that they cannot issue a tourist visa "and haven't for 10 years."

Next, I reported to the Banjercito counter for a TVIP where the helpful lady informed me, as stated by Fang in post 467, that I could complete the visa request form and pay online.

Moving on to the TVIP, she asked me for the ORIGINAL vehicle registration (license plate payment) receipt, my passport, and for copies of both. She also wanted a copy of the vehicle title. I also provided the electronic pre-authorization that I had completed earlier online (I think I maybe mentioned this in a previous post). She reminded me that I needed a Mexico vehicle insurance policy but did not ask to see it (I took it with me just in case). She said the border agents may ask to see it. They charged my credit card (I had pre-authorized payments in Pesos) 8,218.9 pesos ($465.28) which was $400 deposit on my 2017 KTM and the remainder in fees. There was the usual rubber stamping, signing, and passing lots of copies and documents back and forth.

Then the consulate man smiled, shook my hand, waved good-by, and nicely wished me "Merry Christmas." I wonder how many times I've done that in another language. I smiled and thanked them all.:-P

When I got home I completed the visa request form here:https://www.inm.gob.mx/fmme/publico/solicitud.html. The computer form charged me 500 pesos $28.30USD and issued me a Forma Migratoria Múltiple Electrónica and a FMME Frontera Norte and a Folio de la Operación.

Awhile after you submit the online form, the Mexican government will email you a link to your official form, the FORMA MIGRATORIA MÚLTIPLE (FMM). You must open this email and print this form and take it with you to the border crossing. It is NOT sufficient to print the last web page for you complete.

So I got a 6-month visa request and TVIP starting in a week (in case I win the lotto and can leave early).

I understand that I'm to show the TVIP and the Forma Migratoria Múltiple Electrónica / PAGO DE DERECHOS POR SERVICIOS MIGRATORIOS (aka PAYMENT OF RIGHTS FOR MIGRATION SERVICES) to the government agents at the border crossing.

More on the new consulate location:

I mentioned the new address on Ben White Blvd in a previous post. I entered that address into Waze and it led me a long block away, nearing my appointment time and looking at a maze of buildings for the consulate. I'm glad I was early as I wasted some time driving around. The actual address was the next cross street west of the location the Waze application took me to. Once you get the the correct intersection the consulate has posted lots of small signs leading the way. When I finally got to the right building, I asked my Garmin my current location and it indicated N 30.21780 W 097.72337. It is a brown 2 story building.

Anything else I need to do for the government of Mexico?
So, doing it this way, what needs to actually be done at the border? Getting through the border was the one part of my trip that sucked. Anything I can do to minimize my time there is worth it.
 
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So, doing it this way, what needs to actually be done at the border? Getting through the border was the one part of my trip that sucked. Anything I can do to minimize my time there is worth it.
I hope others can answer more definitively but AFAIK all I need to do is hand the border agent the TVIP, FMM and any supporting documentation and then hopefully hear the usual pounding of rubber stamping and them handing me documents.

In other countries, I've always tried to have all my documents completed and organized then they usually just get me through line quickly and seems to minimize unnecessary drama.:deal::rider:

If there is anything else I'd like to know as well.
 
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Mzungu, Please let us know how it goes at the border. This is on my "bucket list" rides and I am one of those that like to have things in order. So If I could minimize any drama I'm all for it!
Good luck, ride safe, and have fun!!

:popcorn:
 
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Round Rock
My one MexTrek trip, I did everything at the border and it was pretty easy since I had a Spanish speaker with me! I plan on doing all my paperwork at the border again, and hope I can find another translator that will come along with me!
 
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Mzungu, Please let us know how it goes at the border. This is on my "bucket list" rides and I am one of those that like to have things in order. So If I could minimize any drama I'm all for it!
Good luck, ride safe, and have fun!!

:popcorn:
Happy to. If I forget please ping me. I figure if I can do a border entry in 1-2 hours I'm doing good, but have done some in 15-20 minutes, much to my surprise and delight! I've known of cases where it took people 8 hours (usually because their paperwork was not done in advance AND because they refused to pay the requested "expedited service personal fees," but again this is in Africa; not sure about MX. Anyway, I'm trying to avoid that!

Over-prepared? Okay, guilty, your honor!;)
 
Joined
Feb 25, 2017
Messages
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Travis County
Survey on riding gear choice and rationale from you Galeana Gurus.

I'd trying to decide between motocross/enduro clothing and ADV clothing or mix/match. I'm riding the KTM 500 EXC. I do NOT have a windscreen on my KTM because my GPS mount interferes with a screen plus my handlebars are full of stuff. I have a full complement of MC clothing to choose from (ask my wife), so it's not a matter of buying anything.

- ADV or dirt helmet? ADV has better wind/rain protection and better visibility in traffic vs goggles; dirt = much better ventilation, and can wear glasses vs goggles for better visibility in traffic provided weather is good.
- If motocross/enduro chest protector, hard or soft armor?
- If motocross, jacket and pants: Ventilated with a separate rain/wind shell, or non-ventilated? Colder mornings vs working hard up on the pegs in the sun in the afternoon?
- Motocross or ADV boots?
Mix and matching? ADV jacket and pant with moto armor and knee braces? Or what? Why?

Thanks, Trekers!
Bump
 
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Thank you – a lot of what I saw in the pictures was ADV gear which is kind of why I was asking I guess. I did see some motorcross gear of course. As you suggest, I'll have to make my own decision – just interested in other peoples' thoughts and thought others might benefit is well – that's all.

I guess I'm a little biased toward safety because I was sideswiped in Nairobi and almost run over by a truck which would've been fatal, and I used to be a metropolitan EMT/firefighter and then later military nurse so I've seen plenty of motorcyclists on the street and in the emergency department. I also tend to take one additional step toward safety when I'm in a country where I'd prefer not to get surgery. :-)

All of this wisdom does get overruled by my right hand on the throttle sometimes though :-)

Also, so much of this kind of riding is dictated by terrain, weather and situation and I'm a newb on Mexico, of course.

Or somebody might say "I wore my ventilated gear and I'm so glad I did" or "I wore my ventilated gear and froze my *** off."
 
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Joined
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Thank you – a lot of what I saw in the pictures was ADV gear which is kind of why I was asking I guess. I did see some motorcross gear of course. As you suggest, I'll have to make my own opinion – just interested in other peoples' thoughts and thought others might benefit is well – that's all.


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Disclaimer: The following response is powered by a full day of hot Texas yard work followed up by copious amounts of various combinations of water, barley, hops, and other stuff.

Well, my experience consists of one solo trip down there, so take it for what it's worth. I have spent a fair amount of time riding in Korea, but that's a whole 'nuther animal.

I wore a dirt bike helmet and sunglasses. I had goggles but never used them. My helmet is integrated with a radio, which was irrelevant on my solo ride in Mexico.

I wore knee/shin pads under my OTB goretex KTM pants for all of my riding. They have minimal venting but they were fine. Man parts got a little sweaty, but chicks dig the orange accents, so there's that!

I started off with a soft armored FirstGear Kilimanjaro jacket and armored gloves but put them away at the border crossing until Galeana. Too hot.
I did wear them during my day trips out of Galeana and was sufficiently comfortable but rode unzipped a lot. I wore Fox motocross boots at all times on the bike.

So, like oil choices I think it really boils down to your own personal risk analysis. My very limited experience in that region allowed me to maintain my belief that the biggest risk to me, is me. I rode slower, more cautiously, and just did not take the risks that I might have here in the states. I did not have any issues with motorists. The only issues I had were directly attributable to me being a *******.

One thing that I didn't concern myself with on my trip; the impact that a mishap would have on a fellow rider. Something to think about, because if you're in a group, and you go down, the rest of the group is not going to just keep going. ATGATT might mean the difference between the group spending a few minutes getting you back on your bike or hours dealing with medical and legal issues.

So, as we get closer, I'm still undecided over the Kilimanjaro jacket or Leat body armor. It'll depend on what the weatherman says the day before I leave. I don't have room for both! I'm on a similar bike as yours. (450 EXC)

Others are obviously welcome to chime in, and my advice is guaranteed for the full purchase price.

I'm SO ready to be on the way! Calgon, take me away!


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Well, my experience consists of one solo trip down there, so take it for what it's worth. I have spent a fair amount of time riding in Korea, but that's a whole 'nuther animal.
Well, it's more Mexico experience that I have!!! Everything you shared was useful and insightful. Thanks for sharing your experience.
 
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So, as we get closer, I'm still undecided over the Kilimanjaro jacket or Leat body armor. It'll depend on what the weatherman says the day before I leave. I don't have room for both! I'm on a similar bike as yours. (450 EXC)
Perhaps this will help you decide what to protect yourself with in Mexico.

I have a Leatt 5.5 Body Protector and had it with me in Colorado last week and didn't wear it - wish I did. All I had on was a Kilimanjaro jacket as well but I did have slide on elbow protectors. Hauling the mail on the Colorado Back Country Discovery Route - COBDR - I came around a corner to an obstacle and grabbed too much front brake and went down hard. Got a nice bruising of the left side of the rib cage.

Moral of the story: if it were me, I'd either wear your Leatt - OR - at least one of those chest type rib-specific protectors. You won't have a SAG truck like I did in Colorado so I understand the limitations on what you can bring.

I'll tell you this: so glad I had those slide on elbow protectors. The one on the left side saved my bacon. Would have had severe trauma on the left forearm and a probably broken elbow if I didn't have it.

I went down fairly close to Steamboat. You'll be in nowhere Mexico. I'd plan now to body armor up. There are anecdotal stories of MexTrek riders going down and getting hurt. Reduce your chances and heed your instincts now. I'm not entirely sure but I think Jon Smiley uses a really good rib protector. You can PM him. I also wore a hip protector that saved my left side there as well. It was my only spectacular get off on the COBDR but it was a doosey.

My only Mexico spectacular crash was actually on pavement. Avoiding a car I dumped my GSA and slid for quite a long ways. Had kevlar jacket and pants on that one so the only real damage was a swollen ankle (even with SIDI boots on).

There is good medical care in Mexico but on MexTrek it will be a long way off. Ride within your abilities. I carry a year long MedJet policy but that's outside the scope of your question. PM me for details.
 
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Added something: Monday Oct 30 - Wednesday Nov 1: For 2017 I am looking into a smaller group staying a few extra days to experience Day of the Dead. It is supposed to be amazing in some parts of Mexico. Any suggestions, please post up for discussion.
David Shin and I might be able to stay a few more days. Will confirm you shortly.

Mark
 
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Austin, TX
I'd like to comment on the phrase, "middle of nowhere Mexico."

The places we are going will have some fairly rual and isolated areas, and it often can FEEL very remote and isolated. However I usually have cell phone coverage for most of it, and it truly is quite similar to traveling in many rural and less populated areas in the USA. In my opinion, the areas we are going, for the most part, are less "middle of nowhere-ish" than much of the Southwest around El Paso, Yuma, Terlingua, etc.

So, of course be prepared for a good ride! But don't panic. Being in the beautiful mountains of Mexico logistically is very similar to being anywhere else.

-Steve
 
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So, of course be prepared for a good ride! But don't panic. Being in the beautiful mountains of Mexico logistically is very similar to being anywhere else.
Unless apparently you fail to torque down the bolts on your motorcycle and need someone who speaks Spanish to go find replacements for you

:giveup:

Sorry, all in fun - had to do it! ;)
 
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10 miles from Mexico
I resemble that...
In Big Bend my ribs were layin on a rock next to me crying ��
I third that: 2 weeks ago, Rich was a witness in a riverbed fly off the bike (bike upside down) my elbow, chest protector, helmet, heck full gear saved me to "without a scratch"

and then Doug was a witness down wet pavement after some rain on a slick oily turn, my bike was hurt but my gear saved my butt again to "without a scratch." Well, maybe a fractured thumb, but it could always easily be a lot worst the less gear you wear.

Follow your gut, who cares what everyone else is wearing.
 
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Baja_Bound

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I am hoping to make this trip and have a few questions that someone may be able to answer:

1) My 2009 Yamaha XT250 has a stock carburetor and does well around home (San Antonio, 1200 feet above sea level). Does anyone feel I will need to change my jetting for the higher altitude of Galaena / Sierra Madre Oriental mountain range?

2) I am dirt rider / racer and don't have a lot of experience on the road. I am concerned about the XT250 and the higher speeds on the road between the Mexican border and Galaena. The bike seems to do alright at 50-60mph, but that will probably be its limit loaded with gear. Are there other travelers that keep it on the slow side when traveling on the highway?

3) I am new to dual sporting and traveling with panniers / gear bags. Once you are settled into a hotel at Galaena, do the panniers / gear bags typically come off and remain behind at the hotel? Do you take with you just what is needed on the daily trail excursions (in a smaller bag / backpack / tail bag)?

Thanks for any advice you may be able to provide.
 
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I am hoping to make this trip and have a few questions that someone may be able to answer:

1) My 2009 Yamaha XT250 has a stock carburetor and does well around home (San Antonio, 1200 feet above sea level). Does anyone feel I will need to change my jetting for the higher altitude of Galaena / Sierra Madre Oriental mountain range?
I'm no motorcycle mechanic and it's a different bike so take what I'm about to say with a pinch of salt.

I used to have a 2012 DRZ 400 S – obviously carbureted – and I lived at 7400 feet in Colorado. I would ride the bike on dirt roads up to 9000 feet or so with no problem. I didn't experience any obvious problems or sounds and while it may not have performed optimally it was able to carry my 200 pound body plus gear around.

Obviously having a 400 cc motor helped with the power so although your engine might run fine depending on how much your bike is carrying it may or may not have power issues as defined by you.

I'm not qualified to address your other questions and I'm probably not qualified to address the one I just did :-)

If you want a definitive answer you might call Jeff at Slavens Racing in Colorado Springs or there is a Suzuki/Yamaha/Honda shop in Colorado Springs but I can't remember the name of it – you could probably figure it out by googling. It would have a 719 area code.

Hope to see you on the trail with a big smile on your face!
 
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1- As Mzungu said. No need to work on Carb for altitude change. We won't be racing up there.
2- Cruising speed bet. Border to Galeana will be based on the slowest bike. We arrive as group, no one is left behind.
3- if your bike is not race-prepepped with bored out motor or other modification, it should have no problem. Peter, the organizer of this ride rides CR150f.






QUOTE=Baja_Bound;1523432]I am hoping to make this trip and have a few questions that someone may be able to answer:

1) My 2009 Yamaha XT250 has a stock carburetor and does well around home (San Antonio, 1200 feet above sea level). Does anyone feel I will need to change my jetting for the higher altitude of Galaena / Sierra Madre Oriental mountain range?

2) I am dirt rider / racer and don't have a lot of experience on the road. I am concerned about the XT250 and the higher speeds on the road between the Mexican border and Galaena. The bike seems to do alright at 50-60mph, but that will probably be its limit loaded with gear. Are there other travelers that keep it on the slow side when traveling on the highway?

3) I am new to dual sporting and traveling with panniers / gear bags. Once you are settled into a hotel at Galaena, do the panniers / gear bags typically come off and remain behind at the hotel? Do you take with you just what is needed on the daily trail excursions (in a smaller bag / backpack / tail bag)?

Thanks for any advice you may be able to provide.[/QUOTE]
 
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austin
Folks....
w/ regret.....
I have to CANCEL this epic ride.
My son invited us to attend UT's Parents Weekend , Oct 27-29 .
He's now a Sr., so we're thrilled to take part in this event during his last yr as a Longhorn.
 
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After all these years of riding I happened to have my first two rib related injuries within the last 12 months. Pretty debilitating afterwards (even months later in one case). Ribs seem to be one of the harder areas to protect but I have a renewed focus in that area now.
 
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Thanks everyone for all the helpful feedback and encouragement so far related to the gear question post. I got a hard armor with rib protection Leatt 5.5 Body Protector awhile back.

I generally wear ADV gear or soft armor on the street or gravel, and hard armor on rocks - I'm hearing rocks.

Even though it's warm and not the easiest thing to deal with when getting lunch at a restaurant and the like, it's pretty protective -- based on all the feedback, think I'll bring it.

On the boot question - looking at photos or previous years' Galeana trips, I see a lot of ADV boots. I LOVE my Sidi ADV boots. I also have Sidi motocross boots - more protection, harder to walk around in.

Thoughts on boot trade-offs on dirt bikes for this trip?
 
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Baja_Bound

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1- As Mzungu said. No need to work on Carb for altitude change. We won't be racing up there.
2- Cruising speed bet. Border to Galeana will be based on the slowest bike. We arrive as group, no one is left behind.
3- if your bike is not race-prepepped with bored out motor or other modification, it should have no problem. Peter, the organizer of this ride rides CR150f.
Excellent. Especially the no one is left behind part. My wife (who is not going) was very happy to hear that!
 

JT

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I will lead a group Thursday morning to Santiago, through Laguna de Sanchez and Rayones then on to Galeana. This route will be at least 220 miles. If we encounter rain in the mountains, we will probably detour around the higher elevations adding as much as 30 miles to the route.

This group will be limited to about eight riders.

We will be following Trail Boss’ Gold Standard route south of Laguna de Sanchez. This is mostly Class 2, but there are some short Class 3 sections. I do not recommend this route for any bike larger than a 690/701.

The Pemex station in Rayones was closed the first weekend of September. As we do not know if gas will be available there, your bike would need at least 130 mile fuel range.

All riders in this group will be expected to wear protective gear. Minimum gear consists of off-road boots, knee, elbow, shoulder and back pads and of course, helmet. Also all bikes should be equipped with a toolset including a socket to fit your sparkplug, spare sparkplug, sockets or wrenches to remove front and rear wheels, tire tools, and spare tubes. All bikes should be capable and riders comfortable cruising an honest 65mph.

Send me a pm if you are interested in joining this group. I will be traveling most of the next 2 weeks, so don’t get frustrated if you don’t get a quick response.

JT
"The Pied-piper of adventure riding." per Trail Boss
 
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Joined
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I will lead a group Thursday morning to Santiago, through Laguna de Sanchez and Rayones then on to Galeana. This route will be at least 220 miles. If we encounter rain in the mountains, we will probably detour around the higher elevations adding as much as 30 miles to the route.

This group will be limited to about eight riders.

We will be following Trail Boss’ Gold Standard route south of Laguna de Sanchez. This is mostly Class 2, but there are some short Class 3 sections. I do not recommend this route for any bike larger than a 690/701.

The Pemex station in Rayones was closed the first weekend of September. As we do not know if gas will be available there, your bike would need at least 130 mile fuel range.

All riders in this group will be expected to wear protective gear. Minimum gear consists of off-road boots, knee, elbow, shoulder and back pads and of course, helmet. Also all bikes should be equipped with a toolset including a socket to fit your sparkplug, spare sparkplug, sockets or wrenches to remove front and rear wheels, tire tools, and spare tubes. All bikes should be capable and riders comfortable cruising an honest 65mph.

Send me a pm if you are interested in joining this group. I will be traveling most of the next 2 weeks, so don’t get frustrated if you don’t get a quick response.

JT
"The Pied-piper of adventure riding." per Trail Boss


Thursday 26th beginning in Mission?


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Anyone on the planet who has the chance to ride Mexico with John Thompson better take it. He, Richard Gibbens and Milton Otto, define Mexico exploration.

I rode with John to the Mexico side of the Rio Grande overlooking Big Bend National Park. Terlingua to Presidio/Ojinaga crossing, back through Manuel Benevides through the desert to the bluff 1500 feet up overlooking Texas. It was my last ride with my beloved buddy Chuck Blair before he died, soon after. Life defining. Thank you JT.

Heed JT's warnings about tools/gear/prep. Great advice! If you sign up with JT for this ride, don't be a tool and ignore his words on preparation.

In the photo below, that's me on the left, and the late Chuck Blair on the right (this is a different ride than the Rio Grande ride described above)

John, Milton, Richard, Chuck, and a few others are my Mexico legends/heroes. Any No0b who wants to follow in their footsteps better tighten the strings on his sack and be prepared.
 
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TossingLead

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JT is the man, did the Jalpan run and the over look with him along with some other places.

Tumbleweed and I will be leaving out of Mission early 21st, Is anyone else planning to head south early?
 
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JT is the man, did the Jalpan run and the over look with him along with some other places.

Tumbleweed and I will be leaving out of Mission early 21st, Is anyone else planning to head south early?
I'll meet up with you guys somewhere around there 21st or 22nd. I found FOUR, yes 4 places, that do a Cabrito Especial on the S. side of Monterrey. I just may go and try each one :sun:
I'm not riding with JT......I'm still healing from the last one :nono:

Trust Tricepilot's advice and follow JT's advice.....
 

TGTUMBLEWEED

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Anyone on the planet who has the chance to ride Mexico with John Thompson better take it. He, Richard Gibbens and Milton Otto, define Mexico exploration.

I rode with John to the Mexico side of the Rio Grande overlooking Big Bend National Park. Terlingua to Presidio/Ojinaga crossing, back through Manuel Benevides through the desert to the bluff 1500 feet up overlooking Texas. It was my last ride with my beloved buddy Chuck Blair before he died, soon after. Life defining. Thank you JT.

Heed JT's warnings about tools/gear/prep. Great advice! If you sign up with JT for this ride, don't be a tool and ignore his words on preparation.

In the photo below, that's me on the left, and the late Chuck Blair on the right (this is a different ride than the Rio Grande ride described above)

John, Milton, Richard, Chuck, and a few others are my Mexico legends/heroes. Any No0b who wants to follow in their footsteps better tighten the strings on his sack and be prepared.
yup, you better be ready if you are following jt
 
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So I go to the Banjercito site to get the temporary vehicle import application.

It says to go to an electronic pre-authorization site where I entered my name and passport info.

And the result is: "You are not able to obtain an electronic pre-authorization. In the case that you require to file a temporal vehicle import permit, you shall file it directly in the Mexican border port office by the time you arrive to Mexico."

What is up with this?
 
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So I go to the Banjercito site to get the temporary vehicle import application.

It says to go to an electronic pre-authorization site where I entered my name and passport info.

And the result is: "You are not able to obtain an electronic pre-authorization. In the case that you require to file a temporal vehicle import permit, you shall file it directly in the Mexican border port office by the time you arrive to Mexico."

What is up with this?
Don't worry about it unless you've previously held a TVIP that you didn't cancel

Don't bother with pre authorizations

Just show up with an original state registration as well as an original bike title. You won't need both but anymore I bring both as an insurance policy against a fussy official.
 
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All riders in this group will be expected to wear protective gear. Minimum gear consists of off-road boots, knee, elbow, shoulder and back pads and of course, helmet. Also all bikes should be equipped with a toolset including a socket to fit your sparkplug, spare sparkplug, sockets or wrenches to remove front and rear wheels, tire tools, and spare tubes. All bikes should be capable and riders comfortable cruising an honest 65mph.
I like it...my type of ride.
 
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Don't worry about it unless you've previously held a TVIP that you didn't cancel

Don't bother with pre authorizations

Just show up with an original state registration as well as an original bike title. You won't need both but anymore I bring both as an insurance policy against a fussy official.
On the tvip subject, how picky are they regarding the name on the title? My legal name is Richard but it is Rick on the title. Address is the same on title as ID. Do I need to change my title? If I do it will be taxed like buying it all over again.
 
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On the tvip subject, how picky are they regarding the name on the title? My legal name is Richard but it is Rick on the title. Address is the same on title as ID. Do I need to change my title? If I do it will be taxed like buying it all over again.
The honest answer is that you **should** be fine, unless you get a super fussy official. I've seen everything at the border, including people get rejected for the name thing. I've also seen other sail through.

The general advice is that the Three Keys to Mexico entry, your (1) Passport name, your (2) credit card name, and your (3) title or registration name all should match exactly.

It doesn't make sense to me that merely correcting a title name would trigger a tax event. Here's what I found online:

Texas Vehicle Title/Registration Name Change

After a legal name change, you'll also need to change your name on your Texas DMV vehicle records. When you change your name on your certificate of title, your vehicle registration records will also be updated.
You do not need to purchase new registration documents.
To change your name on your vehicle title, visit your local county tax assessor-collector.
in person and bring:
A completed Application for Texas Title (Form 130-U) with your new name.
A letter that includes:
Your vehicle information.
The reason for your name change.
Your legal name change document, such as your:
Marriage certificate.
Divorce decree.
Court order.
Your original vehicle title.
Payment for the title fee. Fees vary depending on your county. Contact your local Texas DMV office for exact fees.


So it appears you pay a title fee, but I can't find where you'll ante up for taxes.

If I were in your shoes, I'd make sure your name was the same on the three keys I mentioned above. I don't like heading to the border unsure about my adventure. Your call though.
 
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This has absolutely nothing to do with Mexico per se, but if you're in need of a new helmet for MexTrek (practice that excuse for the wife ;) :giveup:), I just got in my new Scorpion AT 950 (in hi viz yellow accents). Give the link a try below.

The reason to me that it's a great "Mexico Helmet" is that I like flip ups in Mexico for talking to soldiers at checkpoints, and at toll kiosks. This helmet is among the first dual sport design helmets with a modular flip front. The visor thing is removable. Ergo, it'll work well/look good on a KTM 500 or a 1200 GSA. You can also remove the face shield completely and use goggle if that's your thing.

I've been using my Schuberth modular on my KTM 500 but I did a fabulous face plant in it two weeks ago in Colorado so this Scorpion is what I replaced it with.

The best news on the Scorpion is that it's a $289 helmet with cool features.

Here's the Revzilla link

If you're going to pull the trigger on this helmet PM me, I have insights as to sizing.

Anyhoo, if you're going over your Mexico gear and and think you need a new helmet for the trip, take a look at the link.
 
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Peter, if you stay longer for the day of the dead, do you plan to be back in Texas on Wednesday 1, or the next day?

Mark
Wednesday the 1st is the actual day of the dead, starting as the clock hits midnight on the night of the 31st. Probably it is possible to leave at 8 AM and make it back to Houston, but probably more realistic to plan to be back the 2nd. But, make it whatever trip you want. nothing is more than loosely organized.
 
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On the tvip subject, how picky are they regarding the name on the title? My legal name is Richard but it is Rick on the title. Address is the same on title as ID. Do I need to change my title? If I do it will be taxed like buying it all over again.
Oklahoma, like Texas, should be held responsibly for making sure your title matches your ID at time of titling.
 
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I am hoping to make this trip and have a few questions that someone may be able to answer:

1) My 2009 Yamaha XT250 has a stock carburetor and does well around home (San Antonio, 1200 feet above sea level). Does anyone feel I will need to change my jetting for the higher altitude of Galaena / Sierra Madre Oriental mountain range?

2) I am dirt rider / racer and don't have a lot of experience on the road. I am concerned about the XT250 and the higher speeds on the road between the Mexican border and Galaena. The bike seems to do alright at 50-60mph, but that will probably be its limit loaded with gear. Are there other travelers that keep it on the slow side when traveling on the highway?

3) I am new to dual sporting and traveling with panniers / gear bags. Once you are settled into a hotel at Galaena, do the panniers / gear bags typically come off and remain behind at the hotel? Do you take with you just what is needed on the daily trail excursions (in a smaller bag / backpack / tail bag)?

Thanks for any advice you may be able to provide.
1. Jetting isn't usually an issue, especially on a factory stock post 2000 model EPA restricted machine. Worst case, a quick drop of the carb needle will fix most altitude sickness, except for at full throttle. If you want to be super safe, just get one or two jet sizes smaller from Yamaha and throw them in your pack.

2. I ride a 230F. Published top speed is 47 MPH. Top speed of the 17" street version is 70MPH, which I geared mine to match. Same reviewer online ( www.topspeed.com ) lists your XT at 75 MPH. MCN rated actual GPS top speed as 75.9

I run 60 - 65 MPH the whole way in on the concrete. Once you exit concrete your speed is based on ability. My bike tops out at 82 MPH on GPS if I tuck and pin it for a while. I would think an XT250 would do a bit better.

Justine rode a KLX250S last year and had zero issues keeping up. Her published top speed is 80.

3. A small set of soft bags, strapped over the seat, should suffice for a 4 day trip. They get tossed in the hotel except for the ride in / out.
 
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