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2017 MexTrek #6, Oct 26th to 29th 2017

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One of our friends will probably miss the trip. He had a mishap in Montana. He is smart to have Medjet to take him back to his home hospital.
I'll let him post if he wants to share the details.

I'm adding the link here. Do your research . $99 for a week. $270 for a year.

www.medjetassist.com
Medjet is comprehensive. ?

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Joined
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Sugar Land, TX
Awesome.....
Music from the Huastecas region. Nice!!!!

We'll be just north of the Huasteca region, although the topography is similar.

According to Lonely Planet...

The stunning, tropical Huasteca Potosina, is a lush, remote subregion of San Luis Potosí and, although part of the same region, could be worlds away.

A huge drawcard are the region’s incredible waterfalls and swimming holes, the result of the rivers that flow eastward from the slopes of the Sierra Madre Oriental. They look as though they’ve been naturally photo-shopped, so rich is their aquamarine hue, thanks to the high calcium content in the surrounding rocks. You can swim near and take boat trips to some of these spectacular cascades.

A rich culture of the local Huastec people (Tének), plus extraordinary sinkholes and birds, make a visit here extremely rewarding.

The entire Huasteca encompasses parts of San Luis Potosí, Hidalgo, Puebla, Queretaro, Tamaulipas and Veracruz. The name ‘Huasteca’ refers to the place where the Huastec culture developed; the region is known for huasteco (or huapango), a style of music that combines violins and the guitar-like jarana, and local dishes, such as the zacahuil, a massive tamale.

Over the last decade in particular, Mexicans and adventurists have ‘discovered’ the Huasteca Potosina; as yet, few foreigners know of it. You can get to Xilitla by public transport; for the rest, it’s easiest to have your own transportation or go with a local tour operator.

Rio Verde, east of San Luis Potosí, falls just outside the boundaries of the Huasteca Potosina but its crystalline, warm water lagoon attracts divers and families.
 
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I need to be in San Luis Potosi square on Sunday for the weekly concert. Heading down to Xilitla after, and I really need to wash off all that grime at a place called Tolantongo, if time allows...The waterfalls, river and hot springs there look amazing. The last 15 miles of the road going into the park is all switchbacks, according to the map. I needed a kick start like MexTrek to get down and explore this area of the Huasteca. Thanks guys!
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JT

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Hi Jon, there are some youtube videos of Tolantongo that show more of the pools and river. I have been looking at it for the last year.I'd like to try coming in from the Northwest from Zimapan/Jacala.
 
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I need to be in San Luis Potosi square on Sunday for the weekly concert. Heading down to Xilitla after, and I really need to wash off all that grime at a place called Tolantongo, if time allows...The waterfalls, river and hot springs there look amazing. The last 15 miles of the road going into the park is all switchbacks, according to the map. I needed a kick start like MexTrek to get down and explore this area of the Huasteca. Thanks guys!
having just been thru that area, my mental notes are....

There is an abundance of water and springs nearer to Cuidad Valles. It is due East of SLP. Its 5 hrs from Mextrek to El Naranjo (quaint small town with a $25 hotel on the river) with waterfalls nearby. Also, from Mextrek, a stop over in Tula,a nice overnight town we made a layover on the Jalpan ride last year. From El Naranjo its a couple more hours south to Xilitla. On the road from SLP to Cuidad Valles is Tomosopo falls.

Tolantongo is 9.5 hrs from Mextrek if you go direct on the main highway, but if you go thru Xilitla its 6.5 hrs more riding, a total of 13.75 hrs from Galeana.
 
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Feb 25, 2017
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Travis County
I'm considering the TuBliss system but am queasy about running it on pavement and about drilling holes in my Excel A60 rims.

Questions:
1. Anyone run TuBliss at speed (65mph) for a few hours on tar/pavement? The TuBliss company don't recommend their product on pavement. Wondering how it would do on the pavement stretch from the border to Galeana and back. It it matters, I'm running MotOz DOT-rated desert tires on a KTM 500 EXC-F.

2. Also, if one does get a no-kidding flat with the TuBliss, is the solution to pull the system apart and replace it with a regular tube in the tire? ANy issue with that extra hole in the wheel?
 
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Austin
1. Anyone run TuBliss at speed (65mph) for a few hours on tar/pavement? The TuBliss company don't recommend their product on pavement. Wondering how it would do on the pavement stretch from the border to Galeana and back. It it matters, I'm running MotOz DOT-rated desert tires on a KTM 500 EXC-F.
I have rode with tubeliss on a F800gs, from Austin to Big Bend.
I haven't notice any significant change.
I would install it again if my rims weren't too wide for it
 
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Austin
I'm starting to think that my bike is too heavy for this one.
Out of curiosity, are there riders who plan to go off-road on heavy DS bike (GS/tiger style)?
 
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Joined
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I'm considering the TuBliss system but am queasy about running it on pavement and about drilling holes in my Excel A60 rims.

Questions:
1. Anyone run TuBliss at speed (65mph) for a few hours on tar/pavement? The TuBliss company don't recommend their product on pavement. Wondering how it would do on the pavement stretch from the border to Galeana and back. It it matters, I'm running MotOz DOT-rated desert tires on a KTM 500 EXC-F.

2. Also, if one does get a no-kidding flat with the TuBliss, is the solution to pull the system apart and replace it with a regular tube in the tire? ANy issue with that extra hole in the wheel?
1. Many people ride cross country with them. I don't think the tiny trip to Galeana will be an issue. Fang regularly rides 90 MPH sustained on his KTM 690 without a care in the world.

2. While not speaking from experience, there should be no downside to pulling the TuBliss system out and replacing with a traditional rim strip and tube. The size hole you put in the rim won't be an issue. Tubliss kits ship with a plug so you can plug the hole that the original bead lock used. A spare plug would give you certainty you'd have to issues if you wanted to go back to tubes. Worst case, you could use a tire patch from the inside.

But the vast majority of users have no issues. Most people love them. Early versions had high pressure inner tubes that leaked down and caused some issues. And improper cleaning and installation can lead to very slow leak down of tire pressure. But now, if installed correctly, there are no downsides except needing a 100 PSI pump for the bladder. All these seem to be very minor compared to the inconvenience of making trailside tube replacements.
 
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I'm starting to think that my bike is too heavy for this one.
Out of curiosity, are there riders who plan to go off-road on heavy DS bike (GS/tiger style)?
A Triumph 800 will be just fine for this ride. You'll have a huge advantage on the 250 miles of street riding, and each day heading off to the trails you'll be comfortable on the pavement. On the gravel it might be a bit too big to be ideal, but should be perfectly manageable.

Andre rides a Tiger 1200 and Dave B rides a BMW1200GS. I don't want to make a guess at their exact ages, but together it's around 150 yrs experience on this earth. They both do fine in the dirt in Mexico on 600 pound slabs of motorcycle. Your "little" 800 will do fine.
 
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I'm going to try to keep up on the trails with Shadman on a R100GSPD.

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This will be fun!

You're only on a 456 pound dry weight bike. Add 9.5 gallons and you're at 456 +58 = 514. Shealaurie will only have 460 wet. Andre will have 570lbs wet on his 1200 Tiger, but 135 horses to work with.

I'll have 249 lbs wet and 16 horsepower with gearing that is 30% taller than factory, LOL. Safety third!!!!

P
 

Charger8206

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Me and Escout are looking to do a ride in Marble Falls at the Hidden Falls Adventure Park sometime in August to make sure the bikes are ready for the trip. We figure its better to find out if anything wants to break on this side of the border. Both of us are riding KLR 650's. Anyone interested in meeting up?
 
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Me and Escout are looking to do a ride in Marble Falls at the Hidden Falls Adventure Park sometime in August to make sure the bikes are ready for the trip. We figure its better to find out if anything wants to break on this side of the border. Both of us are riding KLR 650's. Anyone interested in meeting up?
Great idea. I recommend doing at least some riding with a full (simulated) load to see how the gear travels down the trail.
 
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Marble Falls, Tx
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Harry
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What's the preferred bike of choice for this trip if you have your choice between a 2012 KLR650 and a 2016 CRF250? The CRF is much more nimble but limited in distance, and the KLR is just the opposite. Which bike would suit this ride the best?
 
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I've done this trip on a XR650L and was very ideal for me. I now have a AT CRF1000L and CRF250L Rally and have a clear preference for the 250 for this trip. Less weight and more nimble are a few reasons why.
 
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Austin
Any idea how technical are the dirt roads there?
I wonder if it's reasonable to keep my aluminum panniers on the bike at this ride.
 
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Any idea how technical are the dirt roads there?
I wonder if it's reasonable to keep my aluminum panniers on the bike at this ride.
Most of the dirt roads the group rides could be carefully navigated on a Hardly Davidson with street tires.
...and you could go down and have a good time, choosing easy terrain and be just fine. Imagine your typical 1990's crappy Japanese 4-door Toyota Tercel sedan. Front wheel drive, no ground clearance, leaks oil.... That's what many people there drive where most people will be adventuring riding on their ****** dualsports, most of the time. Roads, not paved, sometimes weather eroded with ruts and pot holes.
I try to seek out places you can't get to in a modified Jeep, and those trails exist, but most of the group usually won't be riding that stuff; it's a bit off the beaten path.

Having said that, I don't like aluminium paniers. Even on easy unpaved terrain it's real easy to fall and use them to break an ankle. But that's just my opinion, and I've never taken them to Mexico. But I do usually crash a few times while I'm there while navigating tricky stuff.

Your milage may vary.
Come and bring what you've got. You can always do better next time.

Just my $0.02
-Steve
 

JT

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I also prefer soft bags for off-pavement rides. And it doesn't have to be the toughest trail out there that breaks your leg. Most of these unpaved roads are simply bull-dozed and smoothed local surface, not imported gravel. Add a little rain to the common red dirt and even the easiest of the roads will become a mudfest, some of the worst conditions to have hard bags mounted on the bike.

If you don't have a good alternate bag solution, pack your tools and day ride supplies in a tail bag/box and leave the hard bags in the hotel during the day rides. And stick to the easier route to and from Reynosa.
 

exphiveoh

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Me and Escout are looking to do a ride in Marble Falls at the Hidden Falls Adventure Park sometime in August to make sure the bikes are ready for the trip. We figure its better to find out if anything wants to break on this side of the border. Both of us are riding KLR 650's. Anyone interested in meeting up?
Charger,

Did you make it out to Hidden Falls to ride in the dirt? If you haven't and still plan on going, let me know. I'm interested in tagging along.
 
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Any idea how technical are the dirt roads there?
I wonder if it's reasonable to keep my aluminum panniers on the bike at this ride.
18 miles of non-technical gravel road (easy, but not a cakewalk...rocky and off camber in places) on the official ride in. Other routes on the way in add between 50 and 60 miles of the same. Most riders take all concrete on the return trip home.

Leave the bags at the hotel during the day rides. Aluminum will be fine.

I use a set of small soft BILT bags from Cycle Gear. https://www.cyclegear.com/accessories/bilt-saddlebags On sale for $49.

they fit a pair of Nike shoes, 3 pairs of jeans, 6 shirts, 6 boxers, 8 pair socks, belt, basic toiletries, headphones, phone charger, UV-5R radio, wet wipes, bathing suit, and a small took pack. That's what I had for my 750 mile ride from Aspen to Phoenix yesterday. Survived a 60 MPH highway tumble on Mextrek last year. Comes with 4 extra straps to secure to frame / pegs / tail. I used to carry a large backpack. Now, just an over the shoulder tiny bag for essentials. The weight stays on the bike.

bilt_saddlebags_black_grey_750x750.jpg
 
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