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a meetup ride to learn from

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hey guys, i'm posting this story from another mc forum in order to stress not only ATGATT but the need to have and share important info with your riding buddy(s). this just happened over the weekend:

In my failed attempt to organize a Vstrom group ride previously scheduled for today, after much initial interest but no one confirming (all too familiar) I decided to take a ride anyway. Fellow South Texas rider Aharbi from Austin (an inmate on this site) agreed to meet me in Medina TX and that we would ride the infamous "Three Twisted Sisters" (a 100 mile twisty Hill Country loop consisting of Hwy's 335, 336, and 337) which begins and ends in Leaky TX.

I had never ridden or even met Aharbi prior to this morning, only conversed a few times via posts and PMs on this website. Anyway, we met as planned in Medina and talked for about 15 minutes before beginning our ride together. We rode the 40 miles into Leaky with me in the lead. I didn't know Aharbi's comfort level or ability so after "testing" the pace up and down for a few miles I settled in right at the posted speed limits and Aherbe was never more than a few bike lengths back in my mirrors and showed to be a solid and capable rider.

After a burger in Leaky, we headed out Hwy 337 to begin our loop ride. Right away the road gets very twisty with multiple back-to-back 90 degree hair-pin, blind cliff-side turns with posted speeds between 10 to 20 MPH. This is a very narrow road with 2-way traffic so when a car is approaching from the opposite direction you cant see it until you're in the middle of one of the many turns. And because of the sharpness and quantity of turns, it's really tough to be proactive and look ahead because your focus is directed at the turn you're navigating. All that said, leaned over in one of the turns as a car comes whizzing by 3 feet away from the opposite direction can be somewhat startling.

I lead us through the first few turns and came to a small stretch of straight road where I checked my mirrors and Aharbi wasn't there. I slowed to a crawl, then pulled to the side of the road and waited about a minute but he didn't appear. We had only gone about 2 miles so I knew something was wrong. I turned back up the road and two corners later I found him laying in the middle of the road with his bike on its side......

I ran over and found him conscience but very startled and shaken up. A few other bikes soon stopped and began directing traffic (mostly other bikes) around us. Eventually he was able to sit up and confirm nothing was broken and that he could move all his parts. He was wearing ATGATT which I think probably saved his life. We got his helmet off and helped him to the side of the road, still dazed and very confused, not able to remember what happened or even where he was at. It was a tough situation.......

About 15 minutes later the Sheriff and then the Ambulance arrived. The Paramedics checked him over and confirmed no bones appeared to be broken but they were concerned with his dizziness and dementia. We checked his helmet and found multiple deep scratches and gouges. He was wearing a full face HJC. The Paramedics decided to take him into Uvalde which was the closest hospital, 40 miles away.

Aharbi's Wee was mashed bad. The front wheel was shattered and the forks are bent back to the left side of the frame. The front of the bike is toast and I'm sure the frame is tweaked as well. Its probably a total. I decided to stay behind to wait for the wrecker and accompany his bike back to the tow lot in Leaky. I'm not a doctor so there was nothing I could do for him at the hospital, so I tried to put myself in his shoes and think what I would want someone to do for me given the situation. After the wreck Aharbi couldn't even remember where he was so I felt like he would probably later appreciate that his bike was confirmed to be in safe keeping.

While waiting with the Sheriff we concluded that based on the pavement gouges it appears that while in the apex of the left-hand turn Aharbi made an abrupt right-hand correction which stood the bike up and sent him head on into the guard rail...... Good thing the guard rail was there because the other side was a 50+ foot drop off........ I confirmed to the Sheriff that we were not speeding (entered the corner at approx. 20 MPH) and he agreed that an on-coming car most likely startled him and caused him to veer to the right and into the guard rail. There were no skid marks found and no flat spots on either tire, so it appears he hit while still under throttle....... Per the Sheriff, they are called out for motorcycle accidents on the Three Sisters at least 2 or 3 times each weekend during the summer. And about half of them result in fatalities. This was one of the more well known turns for accidents.

While we were waiting for the tow truck, the Sheriff got a call on his radio stating that while in transit to the hospital, Aharbi had gone to a "Code 1". The Sheriff explained that this meant he had gone critical...... ***? This just seemed to be a routine concussion 10 minutes ago? The Sheriff stated that unfortunately it's common because once the adrenaline wears off the real injuries come to the surface.

So I ditched the plan to stay with his bike and decided to make a bee line for Uvalde. The Sheriff was a super guy and gave me his card, stating he would make sure Aharbi's motorcycle was secure. I made it the 40 miles to the hospital in 25 minutes.

When I arrived Aharbi was in bad shape and fading in and out of unconsciousness. They had already done X-rays and CT scans and found swelling on his brain and fluid in his right lung. Uvalde is a little country hospital so they called in Life Flight and helicoptered him to San Antonio.

Ok, here's where it gets interesting. First the Sheriff, then the Paramedics, then the hospital, all asked me loads of typically routine questions;

What's his name? Aharbi
What's his real name? I dunno
How old is he? I dunno
Where does he live? Ummm, somewhere North of Austin
Where exactly? I dunno
Is he married? I think so
What's her name? I dunno
What's her phone number? I dunno
How can we contact his family? I dunno

OK sir, you're not very much help. Are you being serious? What do you mean you just met him over the Internet? All this sounds pretty crazy sir.

Due to the head trauma while out on the highway and in the hospital, Aharbi couldn't recall much at all. He remembered he had his cell phone in his jacket, but couldn't remember his pass code so we were unable to unlock his phone to find any phone numbers. He couldn't remember if he had any allergies or prior medical conditions. He couldn't remember much personal info at all. Eventually he recalled his home phone number, which I called but got an answering machine. I had no choice but to leave "one of those messages" that he had been in an accident, was in the hospital in San Antonio, and to please call me. This was 2:00 this afternoon and it's now 10:00 and I have received no call. I hope to God the hospital was able to locate his wife.

Not sure of Aharbi's status at this time. I did confirm that he made it to the ICU at SAMMC hospital in San Antonio, but because I'm not blood they won't tell me anything more. I'm gonna try again tomorrow and also try and contact his wife.

Lessons Learned

1- ATGATT. As it implies, always, all the time.......Period
2- Don't skimp. Buy the best gear you can afford. If you have to, borrow the money to buy the best gear. How much is your life worth?
3- Wear a quality helmet. I don't know much about HJC, other than I think they are among the lower priced helmets. Was it good enough to prevent further injury? Apparently. Would a higher priced helmet (Shoei, Arai, etc) have prevented the injury he did receive? Maybe, but who knows really. I'm not knocking HJC I just don't know much about them.
4- When you ride with someone you don't know, first things first, exchange basic information. I'm not saying a complete medical or personal history, but basic info like spouses cell phones, home phone, where the **** they live, their real freakin names, etc.

Sorry for the long post, but I figured this story needed to be told.

Say a prayer tonight for Aharbi. God will know his real name........

www.theicedevice.com
__________________
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focus frenzy

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he had no form of identification of any kind on him?? drivers license, insurance card, or ICE card in a front upper pocket??
you did not contact the sheriff and have them check the bike for his wallet or maybe who the bike is registered to?????
 

Texas T

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4- When you ride with someone you don't know, first things first, exchange basic information. I'm not saying a complete medical or personal history, but basic info like spouses cell phones, home phone, where the **** they live, their real freakin names, etc.

Any time I walk out of the house I'm wearing my dog tag that has my name, my DL#, No Allergies, Blood type, Organ Donor, and ICE with my wife's cell phone number. So even if my pants get cut away and left at the scene they should still be able to identify me and who to contact.
 
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Definitely makes you stop and think. He might as well have been riding alone.
I know several folks (bikers, cyclists, runners) who have the Road ID bracelets, I keep saying I'm going to get one.
http://www.roadid.com/Common/default.aspx
 
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REAL GOOD ADVICE! About two months ago I decided to take my code off my phone so if something happens to me all numbers are available. I personally don't have my phone as my life story book so I don't have a lot of information to protect, but at least there are people to contact. I ride alone 99% of the time, and I am deaf. I always wear my medical dog tag too. My friend went and got one of the cheap pay as you go cell phones and rides with that one. He has loaded only names, addresses, and phone numbers of emergency contacts. He keeps his "personal" phone at home for day rides.

I highly recommend this device, simple and easy! http://www.theicedevice.com/pages/home

But I am also guilty of riding with people that I don't know any basic information about.
 
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Just the weekend Rman called me Meriden while talking to my contractor. Most of the TWT phone numbers on my phone are by screen name. How many times do we ride with people and have no idea what to do in case of emergency?

In my wallet I carry my ICE card. I write my ICE information inside my running clothes with a laundry marker and keep a card wrapped around the can of muzzle I carry running in the country. It may be worth while slipping a card inside the emergency cheek pads of the helmet.

m
 
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yall, to clarify and sorry for confusion, I WAS NOT INVOLVED IN THIS RIDE. i'm just passing on this story to emphasize importance of sharing info and having personal info on person when riding.

it was brough up in the thread about why the cop didn't run his plate to get info about him??

HERE IS A REPLY FROM THE ORIGINAL POSTER ABOUT THE DOWNED RIDERS CONDITION:

Hello to all and thanks for your posts and concern...

I received a call from Ahabri's wife late last night and he was still in ICU but doing much better. The swelling on his brain is under control and he is starting to get some of his marbles back. He has no recollection of what happened to cause the wreck, and no memory of the events that unfolded afterwards. She had a positive attitude about the whole situation and was in good spirits.

I figure ill give it a couple of days then touch base to see how he's doing.... I'm really glad he's doing better as I was pretty distraught last night worrying. I've been down twice myself before, but nothing like what happened to Aharbi.

Thanks again for all the comments and ill post again once more is known.
 

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I'm willing to bet the Sheriff had his ID. Sorry to hear about Art's crash and hope he is back home and on the mend soon. If there is anything I can do to help, please let me know.

As long as they were moving him to a higher level of care, why not fly him to his home town in Austin?
 

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A newer technology that is starting to gain traction as more ambulances switch to electronic record keeping.

[ame="http://www.amazon.com/Medical-Alert-Flash-Drive-Metal/dp/B005ZEW4PA/ref=pd_sim_sbs_hpc_4"]Amazon.com: Medical Alert USB Flash Drive Metal Dog Tag: Health & Personal Care[/ame]

414EUEyIWvL._SY450_.jpg


The simple truth is that in a serious traumatic event, paramedics don't care who you are until they reach the hospital. Trauma medicine is very generic including transfusions which only use O- blood (universal donor). History, medications and allergies aren't that important in stopping bleeding, treating fractures and maintaining vital signs.
 
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I'd just like to reiterate to NOT keep information you may need under the seat of your motorcycle. They often separate in a crash distributing anything kept beneath them anywhere and everywhere. If there's a breeze, any paper will readily disappear from the scene.
 

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I'd just like to reiterate to NOT keep information you may need under the seat of your motorcycle. They often separate in a crash distributing anything kept beneath them anywhere and everywhere. If there's a breeze, any paper will readily disappear from the scene.

I had a get off back in 2006. I low sided and then just slid down the road in a straight line until I came to a stop. My wallet had come out of a external pocket of my riding pants and its contents were scattered all over the road. A kind witness stopped and collected everything for me, nothing was missing. So it might be a good idea to carry that kind of stuff in an internal pocket if possible.
 
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I also noted that the fellow riders removed his lid prior to EMS's arrival. From what I've always understood, that's best left to the professionals.
 
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Although I ride bkes and work in emergency response everytime I put my jacket on it crosses my mind....."which of the 15 pockets is my wallet going to end up in today?"

As a rider I know that if I had to cut someone's jacket off to look everywhere for pockets. That's what's cool about riding jackets, plenty of storage. But your average responder that has a jacket with 2-3 pockets is going to take a quick look in the 2 that you usually stick your hands in when you're walking around.

Then you're transported and your jacket is laying on the ground with the bike.

I try to remember to grab one or 2 of my homemade id/emergency contact cards on me. Hope I never need it.
 
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Before I run the ET450 one day rides I make up a card with the names, addresses, and contact numbers of all those that will be riding with me and print a copy for each of them to carry.

I don't plan so well for my local rides, though.
 

Yeeha! Stephen

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Rider info and it's kept location are a HUGE debate in our club right now. We had a serious crash on a trip at the end of last season and we had a terrible time finding the riders info. His DL, insurance, medic alert, and contact info were in different places on his bike.
During the off-season we have tried to come up with an idea for common ground (within our club) and have come up wanting. Everyone has their own idea of what's best and they are varied as the color of socks.

What I do know is that the Trooper that responded only looked for/in the riders wallet. The First Responders only looked for a Medic Alert on his wrist and around his neck. Every other search was left up to us, his riding buddies.

Our debate... Where do WE look. Tank Bag-Which Pocket? Hard bags-Which Ditty Bag? Tail Pack? Jacket Pockets-Inside or Out? Pants Pockets? Under Seat? Jacket Zipper? Pants Zipper? Helmet Tag? Chin Strap Tag? Homemade Info Tag or Store Bought Tag? And... how many of know his wife's/kid's/parent's/siblings REAL name. TIC-TOC TIC-TOC... precious time is wasting!

The debate goes on. But one thing I learned... First Responders only looked for a medical alert tag and for the lack of, assumed the rest according to their training. The Trooper only looked for info in the wallet. Any other info was taken down in his notebook from us and witnesses.

The person that comes up with a universal location for alert info that EVERYONE USES! will become an imortal name in motorcycling.

IMHO
SS
 

Tourmeister

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I also noted that the fellow riders removed his lid prior to EMS's arrival. From what I've always understood, that's best left to the professionals.

:tab Generally this is true, unless the person cannot breathe. If they die from a lack of breathing, neck issues are a bit moot. I do believe there is a correct method for removing the helmet though so as to minimize the chances of causing more harm. Kurt, or one of the other EMT types, might be able to enlighten us if he is reading this thread.

:tab I have seen people that put basic ICE info on a sticker affixed to the outside of their helmet. I like Joel's solution and usually use that for large/organized rides, but don't always do it for the impromptu rides.
 

focus frenzy

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Instructional video on how to properly remove a helmet if it is absolutely necessary to remove it.
[ame="http://youtu.be/e1MdIuVifGQ"]How to remove a motorcycle helmet after a crash - YouTube[/ame]


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In most cases, the rider removes their own helmet and that is OK. Otherwise, leave it in place unless there is a reason to remove it. Bonafide reasons include but are not limited to: mouth-to-mouth or BVM ventilation, clearing airway obstructions (vomit etc.) or bleeding control.
 
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What about a small fob that would have a screw on cover, durable but lightweight, that could attach to a boot strap or lace? If it's a small compartment, the essentials could be written on it and when medics start examining, they might notice a lime green (for example) dommaflatchy hanging off a boot.

Kurt, would this be eye catching enough? Or too subtle?
 

kurt

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If it were red (an international standard) and found in the usual places we expect to find information (neck or wrist), a fob with information inside might be useful. The problem with clothing is that other than a wallet, which everyone expects to find, the clothing is all coming off if you are unconscious. It all gets stuffed in a bag or could become part of the evidence left for law enforcement at the scene.

Our goal is to have trauma victims in an OR in less than one hour from the time of the crash. Our slice of the time pie from arrival on scene until transport is eight minutes or less. In that time we have to strip the victim, assess for and correct immediate life threats, package on a backboard, apply cervical immobilization and load. Often any clothing or ID comes afterwards with law enforcement. There are only a couple of places to visibly store information on a naked person. :mrgreen:
 
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cdc

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Something like this or my November accident, makes me realize it is time to do something about having the information handy, rather than keep thinking it would be a good idea.
 

focus frenzy

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There are only a couple of places to visibly store information on on a naked person. :mrgreen:

So I should have the info tattooed next to the "welcome aboard " tattoo??


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