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Baltimore to Los Angeles - 1924

Joined
Feb 1, 2008
Messages
101
Location
Austin, TX
First Name
Kevin
Last Name
Jolly
I'm building web pages from my wife's grandfather's journal of his motorcycle trips cross-country in 1924 - and I thought you guys might be interested.

May 30, 1924 - June 5, 1924
Balitmore, Maryland to Marshall, Missouri
1033 miles



Journal_final-12.jpg

Phils' Scout in Baltimore before he left for his trip.


May 30, 1924
Baltimore, Maryland to Bridgeport, West Virginia
270 miles


I started from Baltimore, Maryland on a trip to tour the United States at 6:30 a.m. I had clear weather and dry roads. All the roads were asphalt, cement, and brick in good condition. The mountains between Frederick, Maryland and Wheeling, West Virginia were very steep and long making it impossible to pull some in high with my Indian Motorcycle. I arrived in Bridgeport, West Virginia at 5 p.m. having covered about 270 miles. I am going to spend the night in a hotel here.

Journal_final-2_2.jpg

The title for Phil's Scout. The engine number - 55V633 - indicates that it was a 7hp, 37 cubic inch (~600cc) 1923 model Scout. It was the 5,633rd Scout built that year

May 31, 1924
Bridgeport, West Virginia to Indianapolis, Indiana
304 miles


I left Bridgeport West Virginia bound west at 7:30 a.m. after having to change all my haversacks from the rear of my motor to the handle bars because it was too much vibration on the rear. After passing through Cambridge, Ohio all the country was level making it possible to see sometimes ten miles of straight, level good road. All the roads so far have been brick, cement or asphalt. I arrived here in Indianapolis, Indiana at 5:30 p.m. standard time and found out that the time had changed at Dayton, Ohio to Central Time, making my time of arrival 4:30 p.m., one hour difference. I covered 304 miles today and am staying at the Indianapolis YMCA.

Journal_final-9.jpg

Phil made it to Indianapolis the day after the Indy 500. He got to run his scooter around the track. In a letter home to his parents he wrote, "I arrived in Indianapolis the day after the big race, and took my moto-cycle around the track. Made the 2 1/2 miles in 2 minutes and 43 seconds."

June 1, 1924
Indianapolis, Indiana to Terre Haute, Indiana
70 miles


It rained in Indianapolis all morning until about 11:30 a.m. I left the city about noon but only succeeded in getting to Terre Haute, Indiana before the rain started again. I was about two miles from the town, so I spent the night in a barn, getting my supper and breakfast from the farmer after talking about the East with him. I hit the hay about 6:00 p.m. and slept very well. I covered about 70 miles in the day over good roads.

Journal_final-11.jpg

The bridge over the Mississippi at St Louis.


June 2, 1924
Terre Haute, Indiana to St. Louis, Missouri
177 miles


I woke this morning at day break (3:30 a.m.) and started on the road, getting to St Louis, Missouri at 10:00 a.m. The Mississippi River runs right by city. I spent most all afternoon riding on the double-deck buses and streetcars. I worked out in the gym of the Y about 2 1/2 hours getting down to my wrestling weight of 159 pounds. The match came off at 8:30 p.m. sharp in the Y building at Grand Ave. and Sullivan St. I was matched with a local Y man who had much more ex- perience that I. We wrestled for 18 minutes and they decided it a draw. There were six other bouts and then the judges asked that the draw be wrestled off. We went on the mat again for 18 minutes and the judges gave the decision to my opponent, Mr. George R. Littleton, of St. Louis, Missouri. In the days ride I covered 177 miles, all was good but 1 mile of mud.

Journal_final-10.jpg

The St Lousis YMCA


June 3, 1924
St. Louis, Missouri to Calwood, Missouri
110 miles


I left St. Louis, Missouri at 6 a.m. and had fine roads for about 25 miles. From the end of the paved road to Calwood, Missouri the road was nothing but mud. I had a hard time getting through and took quite a few spills but did not hurt me much. I covered 110 miles in 12 hours. I am staying at a hotel here in town.

June 4, 1924
From Calwood, Missouri to
Columbia, Missouri
32 miles


I left Calwood early in the morning in a sea of mud. I only covered 25 miles and burnt my clutch on [the] motorcycle out. Had to be towed by a mule for 7 miles to Columbia, Missouri to a motorcycle garage where I telegraphed to St. Louis for parts. The roads in most places had just been graded and they said it had rained every day for 3 weeks. I am staying at the Y.M.C.A here.

June 5, 1924
From Columbia, Missouri to Marshall, Missouri
70 miles


From Columbia to Marshall is all dirt roads like the others, but I covered 70 miles after getting my motorcycle repaired. I camped out in Marshall in a camping grounds. Had no trouble with the motorcycle after getting on the road.


##​

I'm putting more of Phil's journal up on my website if you're interested - http://www.kevin-jolly.com.
 

Tourmeister

Keeper of the Asylum
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I covered 110 miles in 12 hours. I am staying at a hotel here in town.
Wow... an early DS rider!! That sounds like a few of my trips :doh:

Have you posted this up on Advrider.com? I bet they will be all over this!
 
Joined
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Messages
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First Name
Kevin
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June 6, 1924 - June 12, 1924

June 6, 1924 - June 12, 1924
Marshall, Missouri to Worland, Wyoming
1379 miles



June 6, 1924
Marshall, Missouri to Salina, Kansas
280 miles


I left Marshall at 4:00 a.m. on a hard dirt road. Nothing went wrong until I hit Kansas City. I took a bad spill, tearing up my knee a little. I met a fellow on an Indian Scout from N.Y. State at Topeka, Kansas and rode the rest of the day covering 280 miles. We stayed in a barn just east of Salina. My new partner is going to Limon, Colorado with me and going on to San Francisco alone. Phil’s Indian Scout. The backrest didn’t survive the journey

June 7, 1924
Salina, Kansas to Grainfield, Kansas
210 miles


Leaving Salina early with Brown of New York. We had good hard dirt roads most of the way. There were deep ruts and we both took three hard spills bruising us up a little. We covered 210 miles and stayed in a barn east of Grainfield, Kansas. Today we have been going up a slight grade for 150 miles with wheat fields on both sides.
My side partner with the Indian:
Leroy D. Brown
734 Dolores St.
San Francisco, California
James P. Myers - Phone


June 8, 1924
Grainfield, Kansas to Hugo, Colorado
205 miles


I had trouble with my front wheel and was detained in Grainfield until about 10:30 a.m. The rest of the day we rode fast over good dirt roads. The road all day has been a little uphill. The altitude of Hugo is about 4000 feet above sea level. We rode 205 miles and stayed in a barn overnight. I am now running on Mountain Time.

Journal_final-14.jpg

Hidden Inn - Garden of the Gods, Colorado

June 9, 1924
Hugo, Colorado to Denver, Colorado
via Colorado Springs
210 miles


We left Hugo, Colorado about 4:30 a.m. [and rode to] Limon, Colorado where we had breakfast and separated, Brown going to Denver and I to Colorado Springs. From Limon to the Springs I had fairly good roads. I arrived at the Springs at 9:30 a.m. and started at once to see all there was to be seen. First I went to the Garden of the Gods, which is about seven miles from the Springs. The Garden is made up of a natural formation of curious rocks. Some of the rocks have been worn and carved by the winds and water that they look like images of animals. The Garden of the Gods is about a mile square. From there I went to the Cave of the Winds and then took the road to Pike's Peak. On arriving at the entrance to Pike's Peak I was told that it was impossible for me to go only a few miles up the highway as the snow was too deep. Yesterday I was told they had a skiing contest near the peak. From the highway I went to the Seven Falls which is a continuous falls striking level places seven times before getting to the bottom. I then left Colorado Springs (5 p.m.) and headed for Denver, Colorado, arriving at Denver at 9:15 p.m. During the day I covered 180 miles. I am staying at the YMCA here. I ran around Colorado Springs about 30 miles. The road between Colorado Springs and Denver has an altitude of between 6,300 and 5,200 feet. The altitude of the Springs is 6,200, Denver 5,200, and Pikes Peak 14,192 feet at the top.

Journal_final-15.jpg

Ute Pass Automobile Road.


Journal_final-20.jpg

Steamboat Rock.

June 10, 1924
Denver, Colorado and Vicinity
50 miles


Altitude of Denver 5,300 feet I left the Y. at 9 a.m. to see the city of Denver, Colorado. I toured around until about noon and then started for Lookout Mountain. Buffalo Bill (William F. Cody's) grave is at the summit of the mountain about 25 miles West of Denver. The road leading to it is not very steep but it takes a good car to take it in high. It is uphill for about 10 miles. They have a museum at the top near the grave and a monument which has Buffalo Bill's guns and relics. It also has paintings of him and his battles with the Indians and buffalos. It has a number of pictures of him on the stage and of the Wild West Show. I think the site of his grave is the most beautiful place I have ever seen. On one side [are] the snow capped mountains and [on] the other - in the valley below - Denver.

Journal_final-16.jpg

Buffalo Bill Cody

June 11, 1924
Denver Colorado to Glendo, Wyoming
260 miles


Leaving Denver about 10 a.m. I had good luck and cement roads for about 30 miles. The rest of the road through Colorado was gravel and sand. The roads through Wyoming so far have gravel and hard dirt. The country in Wyoming is very hilly and more like a racer dip than any- thing else. All the roads average over a mile in altitude. The cowboys of other states always dress in old clothes and overalls, but in this state they most all dress like movie cowboys with floppers, high heel boots and red flannel shirts. I slept in a barn about 3 miles north of Glendo, Wyoming. Moto-Cycle running fine.

Journal_final-23.jpg

Wyoming Cowboys.


Journal_final-22.jpg

Casper Wyoming.

June 12, 1924
Glendo, Wyoming to Worland, Wyoming
164 miles


Left Glendo this morning at 4:00 a.m. and had good roads until I got to Shoshoni, Wyoming. At that place the bridge was washed out and I had to cross on a railroad bridge, a distance of about 1/2 mile. From there the roads were mostly sand and loose dirt. I passed through Wind River Canyon which is a very pretty place with bad roads. I also saw the small basin called ****'s Half Acre, which about 1/2 acre of badly broken up ground about 100 feet deep in places. I covered 264 miles.

##​
More on Phil's trip at http://www.kevin-jolly.com
 

Tourmeister

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So it is interesting how they would just hold up in a barn in the evening. Not many folks would let you do that nowadays...
 
Joined
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June 13, 1924 - June 19, 1924

June 13, 1924 - June 19, 1924
Worldand, Wyoming to Baker, Oregon
961 miles


June 13, 1924
Worland, Wyoming to Cody, Wyoming
95 miles


I left Worland early and got in to Cody about 10 a.m. where I found out that I could not get into Yellowstone Park until the June 15th [opening], so I took my motorcycle to a blacksmith and had him straighten the front fork. Cody is a town of about 1,200 people. They are going to unveil the monument of Buffalo Bill (William F. Cody) here July 4 and also have a real Western Stampede. I saw a little rough riding and roping today on their tryouts. I covered 95 miles today and I bought my supplies for my trip into the Park.


June 14, 1924
Cody, Wyoming to Yellowstone Park, Wyoming
Camp Yellowstone Lake altitude 7,800 feet
90 miles


I left Cody early and arrived in Yellowstone Park about 9:30 a.m. and went right in. The road from Cody is through Shoshone Canyon which rises from 1,200 to 1500 feet above the river in the bottom. The road runs along the river in some places and on top of the canyon in some places. There is a dam in the canyon that dams up the Shoshone River in the middle of the canyon. The dam is 328 feet high and 200 feet wide and cost $1,354,000 to build. The dam irrigates 300,000 square miles. The water is backed up for about 15 miles. From the entrance to the Park to Yellowstone Lake (the camping ground [where] I am staying in tonight) is all uphill. The road is just wide enough in most places for one car to pass with turnouts to pass cars going in the opposite direction. I passed through a mountain pass with snow on each side about 5 feet [deep]. It is a beautiful drive up here.

Journal_final-26.jpg

The road into Yellowstone

Journal_final-34.jpg

The Sylvan Pass on the road into Yellowstone


June 15, 1924
Yellowstone Park
201 miles


I left my camp at the north end of Yellowstone Lake early and started out to see the Park. The road followed the Yellowstone River all the way to Canyon Junction. At Canyon Junction the Yellowstone Falls and canyon are located. The falls are 109 feet. There are several small falls before the big one. From Canton Junction I went to Norris Junction. At Norris Junction the Norris Geyser and Norris Basin are located. From Norris Junction to Madison Junction the road follows the Gibson River. There is very pretty scenery on this road and also the Gibson River Falls which are 80 feet high. From Madison Junction I went on the road to Old Faithful. The road follows the Firehole River through the Lower Geyser Basin, The Mammoth Paint Pots, Firehole Lake and the Upper Geyser Basin. The Old Faithful Geyser has an altitude of 7,337 feet and throws water to a height of 165 feet every 55 minutes. I took 3 pictures of it. The water stayed up about 2 minutes. Leaving Old Faithful I went back to the road to Madison Junction. I took pictures of the Grant Geyser, the Grotto Geyser, and the Morning Glory. From Madison Junction I went to the road to the West entrance to the Park. The road follows the Madison River. As a whole Yellowstone Park is a wonderful place. From the Park I started on the road toward Pocatello, Idaho. I camped on the Warm River at Warm River. The tourists of 12 states camped there gathered around a large campfire and told stories and sang songs until 1:00 a.m. It was some day.

Journal_final-36.jpg

The fishing bridge over the Yellowstone River

Journal_final-31.jpg

Pre OSHA park activities

Journal_final-28.jpg

Old Faithful


June 16, 1924
Warm River, Idaho to Black Foot, Idaho
94 miles


I left camp at Warm River about 10 a.m. and had rough going over loose gravel and sand. I took two spills in ruts but did not hurt me much. I am about over the Rockies and on the Plains. I am staying at a Hotel here in Black Foot, Idaho. Arrived here 2 p.m. They had a Western rodeo and horse racing
celebrating Pioneer's Day.

June 17, 1924
Black Foot, Idaho to Filer, Idaho
164 miles


I left Black Foot about 11 a.m. The roads were hard but had loose gravel and stone on them, making it hard to ride in places. I took the State Highway by way of Pocatello, American Falls, Delco, Burley, and Twin Falls. I went across the suspension bridge across the Snake River which they say is the highest suspension bridge in the world. It is 10 miles east of Twin Falls. I covered 164 miles across the Desert of Idaho today. It is the northern end of the Great American Desert. In places there was stretches of 40 to 50 miles with not even a house. I'll get the rest of the desert tomorrow on my way to Boise, Idaho. I camped in a barn.


June 18, 1924
Filer, Idaho to Boise, Idaho
158 miles


I left Filer, Idaho about 10 a.m. on fairly good roads. It has been cloudy all day and several times I got caught in little showers. They say it is the first time it has rained here in two months. All the road today was over dirt except where they irrigate the land. I am now in the Blue Mountains. They have a suitable name because they have a bluish look for miles around. I am staying at the Y.M.C.A. here tonight. They have a fine place here. I am going to wrestle in the Gym tonight. I covered 158 miles today.


June 19, 1924
Boise, Idaho to Baker, Oregon
150 miles



I left the Y.M.C.A. at Boise about 1:30 p.m. and started west on the Old Ore-
gon Trail. The road was gravel and very good. I covered the last 51 miles in 1 hour and 12 minutes over gravel mountain roads. Motor runs better than ever. Everything O.K. so far and staying at the Y. here. I am now traveling on Pacific time.
 
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Kevin
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June 29, 1924 - June 26, 1914

June 20, 1924 - June 26, 1924
Baker, Oregon to Yosemite National Park, California
1304 miles



June 20, 1924
Baker, Oregon to Portland, Oregon
342 miles


I left Baker at 8 a.m. and arrived in Portland at 7:30 p.m. Had good roads. The last 150 miles was over the Columbia River Highway which runs right close to the Columbia River. Was at no time more than 100 yards from it. Sometimes the road is 400 to 500 feet [above] the river on the edge of the banks and then again it dips to the shore. In several places there are very large waterfalls, one that falls about 200 feet. The road in several places runs through tunnels into the mountains. It's a very beautiful Highway and fully worth the five hundred miles I came over to see it and Portland. I covered 342 miles today. Am camping out.

Journal_final-40.jpg

The Columbia Highway

Journal_final-41.jpg

Locks on the Columbia River

June 21, 1924
Portland, Oregon to Eugene, Oregon
130 miles


I got up at 7 a.m. and toured around Portland until 12:30 p.m. I went over the Interstate Bridge which crosses the Columbia River and connects the states of Washington and Oregon. The bridge is about 1 1/2 miles long altogether. The river is nearly a mile wide at this point and deep enough for an ocean liner to come up from the Pacific Ocean. Leaving Portland I went over the Pacific Highway to this place. The road was all cement except a place of gravel about two miles long. I crossed a river into Junction City on a ferry. I bought a new tire for the front wheel today. I am camping tonight at the Eugene camping grounds. It's the best camping grounds I have seen. They all charge admission. P.S. I went to the barber shop today to get shaved this morning, and believe me, if I lived here I would never shave myself. Some Barber.

Journal_final-42.jpg

Mt. Baker

June 22, 1924
Eugene, Oregon to Hornbrook, California
248 miles


I left Eugene about 9 a.m. and arrived in Hornbrook, California at 6:30 p.m. The roads were good cement until I came to the California state line. From there on it has been gravel. The roads from here [to] Redding, California are gravel they say. The route all day was very pretty. The most part was in the valley of the mountains until I came to the Siskiyou Mountain Range which is in southern Oregon and northern California. The summit of the Siskiyou Mountains is 4,850 feet high and gives a fine view of the surrounding country for miles. I covered 248 miles and am camping out in the town's camping grounds.


June 23, 1924
Hornbrook, California to Woodland, California
296 miles


I left Hornbrook about 7:30 a.m. The road from there to Redding, California, 146 miles, was all gravel and very bad as they are rebuilding it. The rest of the way was on concrete and all good. The [last] 100 miles has been level and with very little shade and very hot. There were a few palm trees along the way. I covered 296 miles today and am camping out tonight.


June 24, 1924
Woodland, California to San Francisco, California
100 miles


I left Woodland at 7 a.m. and rode 65 miles to Vallejo, California, and caught the ferry boat Asbury Park direct into San Francisco. The Ferry went right on the Napa River through the straights to the San Francisco Bay. She went right by the immigration quarantine station, the military prison, Naval Training Station and near to the Golden Gate. It was very rough in the bay. On arriving in the city I got a room in a hotel (Y.M.C.A. full) and started out to see the city. I first went to [the] Presidio, the government Post and hospital. It's a pretty place built right on the San Francisco Bay and Golden Gate. It's a small city in itself. I then went to the Golden Gate Park and went through their large museum and all over the park. It is about like Druid Hill Park in Baltimore. About 8:00 p.m. I took a car to Chinatown. It is about 7 blocks long, 2 blocks wide. It certainly is a place worth seeing. I walk[ed] all over it and then back to the hotel on Golden Gate Ave.

Journal_final-44.jpg

SS Ashbury Park - the ferry to San Francisco



June 25, 1924
San Francisco, California
25 miles


I got up at 9 a.m. and started out to see more of the town. I toured all through the business district and all over the suburbs and then went down into the Golden Gate Park to the Golden Gate again. From 4 p.m. until 8 p.m. I spent in the Gym of the Y.M.C.A. At 8:30 p.m. I went to the mat in the Y.M.C.A. tournament here in wrestling in the Y.M.C.A. Pacific Finals. I wrestled unmatched in the 158 pound class, I had to wrestle twice. The first bout of 12 minutes I won by a decision. The second bout after an hour's rest I won from the San Francisco Y.M.C.A.'s best 158 pound man in 1 minute 50 seconds by an arm and wrist lock. It was the quickest bout of the night. My man came out of his corner and went right for a hold. I caught his left arm and floored him, getting an arm and a wrist lock at the same time. The bout lasted 1 minute, 50 seconds. I won a small gold medal and ribbon. (Staying at the Y.M.C.A. tonight - Free)

Journal_final-46.jpg

Downtown San Francisco


June 26, 1924
San Francisco, California to Yosemite National Park, California
190 miles


I left San Francisco early and took the ferry to Oakland and then headed for the Yosemite National Park. The roads were all asphalt or cement until I got within 75 miles of the the Park and then it was all hard dirt. At Oakdale, California the road started to go uphill. It went up until I got to the summit (7,100 feet) of the road to the park. It was hard going but I came up all right, sometimes in low. The road down into the Yosemite Valley is one way traffic and between 20 & 25% grades in some places and if you slip off it is is a 2,500-3,000 foot drop straight down. The road in most places is about 9 feet wide. I am camping on the Merced River in the Yosemite Valley. It is 4000 feet high in altitude and the walls are 3,000 feet high. I covered 190 miles today.

Every night they have the Firefalls at 9 p.m. Towards evening they build a huge fire on top of the cliffs 300 feet above the valley and at 9 p.m. they throw it off slowly. The sparks and embers falling make a beautiful screen of fire at night.

Journal_final-50.jpg

The firefalls at Yosemite

##​
http://www.kevin-jolly.com
 
Joined
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Messages
101
Location
Austin, TX
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Kevin
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Jun 27, 1914 - July 4, 1924

June 27, 1924 - July 4, 1924
Yosemite, California to Los Angeles, California
475 miles



June 27, 1924
Yosemite National Park, California
30 miles


I intended going in swimming this morning in the Merced River, but it is like ice. It runs over and past Glaciers further up the [way] into the mountains. I started out to see the Park at 8:00 a.m. Leaving my camp on the Merced River I took the road to the museum where they have old curios found in the Park. I then took the road up along the wall of the valley to Mirror Lake, which is a small body of water which reflects things like a mirror. I then came back over the Tenaya Bridge past the Half Dome which rises 489 feet above the floor of the valley. I then went to the Happy Isles which is a river rushing over small islands. I then went back to the village past Glacier Point. I toured around and saw the Yosemite Falls, the Vernal Falls, the Nevada Falls, and the Bridal Veil Falls. I am camping on the Merced River again tonight. The altitude of the floor of this valley is 3,950 feet. The half-dome is 8,852 feet. Glacier Point 7,214 feet. The Yosemite Falls fall 2,565, Bridal Veil 620, Nevada 594 and the Vernal 317 feet.

Journal_final-51.jpg

Yosemite



June 28, 1924
Yosemite National Park, California to Gorman, California
345 miles


I left the park about 5 a.m. and headed for Merced, California. The road was very rough and hilly until I got to Merced. At Wawona, California I turned off and went up into the Forest of Big Trees. They are everything they are cracked up to be and as big as even two of them [have] the road run right through [them]. From the Big Trees I went back to Wawoma and then to Merced where I got on the highway to Los Angeles. The road was well paved and I got to Gorman, a small town 60 miles from Los Angeles, and made camp about 5:00 p.m. I covered 345 miles.

Journal_final-52.jpg

Wawona Trees


June 29, 1924
Gorman, California to Los Angeles, California
65 miles


I left Gorman early and got to Los Angeles by 9 a.m. It is Sunday and I could not get my mail so I hunted up Miller. I soon found him and we both went down to the beach in a hired Ford and went in swimming in the Pacific Ocean. It was about like the Atlantic only a little better. From there we went to Hollywood and saw a good many pretty homes some of them the homes of movie stars. I also passed the home of Jack Dempsey, in Los Angeles, it is a regular palace. We went to a show at night. I am living with Miller at 1158 N. New Hampshire Ave. I have covered 5,135 miles so far

Journal_final-40.jpg

The Columbia Highway


June 30, 1924
Los Angeles, California
35 miles


All day I have been running around seeing the town and seeing the homes in Hollywood and Venice. They are the most beautiful homes in the country. It seems that this city is mostly owned by movie people. I also went to the Indian Agency to see about having my motor overhauled and then went to the California Auto Club and found out about the roads in Eastern California and Arizona to the Grand Canyon. They said the road was passable but dangerous, so I guess I'll take the chance and go across. I am going to have my motor overhauled first. I think I'll stay here about a week or ten days.


July 1, 1924
Los Angeles, California


I did not get up until about 11 a.m. but most all afternoon I was traveling around on buses and street cars seeing the city and Hollywood. In the evening a friend of Miller's and Miller and I, took some girls and went riding out through Hollywood and Beverly Hills passing on the way some beautiful homes and studios. We also went to the Magnolia Hill. It pulled the Nash car we were in with 6 [people] in it at the rate of about 5 miles per hour. It is about 200 feet long. This is the first day I have not ridden my motorcycle since I left Baltimore.

Journal_final-60.jpg

Los Angeles


July 2, 1924
Los Angeles, California


I got up about 10 a.m. and went down to the Post Office, but did not get any mail. I then walked downtown and took the car for the beach. The beach nearest Los Angeles is Venice and I went in swimming and stayed almost all day. I then took the car back to L.A. and went to the theater in the evening with a bathing queen I met on the beach.



July 3, 1924
Los Angeles, California


I got up early and took my motorcycle down to the Indian Agency and had the valves ground and the carb cleaned. While they were doing it I went down to the beach and went in swimming. I am going to the theater tonight. I received a letter from Pop and Ma by Air Plane but it did not get here much sooner, about 2 days.

Journal_final-62.jpg

The Indian Dealer where Phil had his valves ground and carbs cleaned.


July 4, 1924
Los Angeles, California


I went to Topanga Beach about 10:00 a.m. and saw a real Bull Fight and Western Rodeo. It was sure great and worth seeing. There was about 10,000 people there. It was a regular gambling ranch. They had a Monte Carlo and dice and card games. In the evening I went up to Venice and went in swimming and then watched the fire works until 11 p.m. It was a great day. The best 4th I have ever seen.

##​
http://www.kevin-jolly.com
 
Joined
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Messages
101
Location
Austin, TX
First Name
Kevin
Last Name
Jolly
July 5, 1924 - July 11, 1924

July 5, 1924 - July 11, 1924
Los Angeles, California to Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona
892 miles



July 5, 1924
Los Angeles, California


I got up early and went down to the Post Office and got 3 letters. I then went out to Hollywood and went through the William Fox Movie Studios. It is some place. There were parts of several cities and towns in there and plenty of lumber. From there I went to Long Beach. It is about like all the other beach cities, only the beach is a little longer. I am going to the theater tonight.

Journal_final-58.jpg

An Alligator Farm - In LA?


July 6, 1924
Los Angeles, California to Tijuana, Mexico
and Return
300 miles


I left Los Angeles about 4:30 a.m. for Mexico. The road was very good but hilly. I had to register when I crossed the border and when I came back. The races were not at Tijuana now but most of the gambling dens were open and I got a good idea of how the place would be in full swing. There were about as many Americans there as Mexicans. I did not stay very long and then headed back by way of San Diego. San Diego is a good sized city, and worth seeing. Leaving San Diego I took the road back and went to the theater in the evening.

Journal_final-68.jpg

The racetrack in Tijuana


July 7, 1924
Los Angeles, California


I got up early and went down to the Post Office and then came back and packed my clothing to send home and my bags to take on my motorcycle. I received a letter giving Ed Klopples address and went to see him. I have everything ready to start early tomorrow morning.

Journal_final-8.jpg

Phil and his bike - packed and ready to leave LA.


July 8, 1924
Los Angeles, California to Ludlow, California
195 miles


I left Los Angeles at 7:30 a.m. and headed east for the Grand Canyon. The roads to Victorville were paved but from there it was nothing but desert and desert roads. The going was rough and sandy and it was awful hot. It was 115 degrees in the shade and the shady places [were] 50 and 60 miles apart. I covered 195 miles and had a couple of spills but [they] did not hurt me much. I broke a spring on my seat and my front fork but I wired them up and it runs. I can't get them fixed for about 800 miles. Camping out.


July 9, 1924
Ludlow, California to Oatman, Arizona
150 miles


I left Ludlow at 4 a.m. on very bad desert roads. There were places where the road was fairly good for a few miles and then it would get very bad and sandy. The thermometer at Needles, California was 128 degrees in the shade and I don't know how hot in the sun. I crossed the Colorado River about 15 miles south of Needles. The river at this point is about 75 feet wide and 60 feet [deep] and runs right fast. They fumigated me and my motorcycle when I crossed the river. The road so far in Arizona has been fairly good. I covered 150 miles today. Needles and vicinity is 10 degrees hotter than any place spoken of in the Bible. I am camping out tonight.

Journal_final-71.jpg

The bridge over the Colorado at Needles, CA.

July 10, 1924
Oatman, Arizona to Maine, Arizona
182 miles
Altitude 7,100 feet


I left Oatman, Arizona at 5:30 a.m. on good gravel roads. The roads all the way to Maine [Arizona] here were good. I stopped in Williams, Arizona and had my front fork welded that I broke coming across the desert and then came onto Maine and camped for the night. It seemed I just ran ahead of a storm all day. I came through Seligman, the place where the time changes 1 hour ahead to Mountain time, at 12:30 p.m. and at 2 p.m. they had a cloudburst that washed bridges out and won't be passable for several days, if then. They say it rains here every day and I will have hard going through the mud for the next 800 miles. The roads are so muddy from here to the Grand Canyon that I'll have to wait till they dry a little before going on.

Journal_final-72.jpg

Two girls in Maine, AZ with a coyote pup.


July 11, 1924
Maine, Arizona to Grand Canyon Park, Arizona
65 miles
Altitude 7,000 feet


I left Maine, Arizona this morning at 9:00 a.m. and took 3 hours to come to the Grand Canyon of the Colorado River over very rough and muddy roads. The Canyon is much prettier than I ever imagined. The coloring of the rock strata and the shadows make it the canyon incomparable in both size and beauty. They have a large hotel and railroad station here and several stores. I am camping out. The trail down to the river is 7 1/2 miles. I am going to go down it in the morning if nothing happens to my feet. They say it is a bad climb back, but I think I can make it. I'll try, at least.

Journal_final-76.jpg

The Grand Canyon of the Colorado


###​
http://www.kevin-jolly.com
 
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Location
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July 12, 1924 - July 18, 1924

July 12, 1924 - July 18, 1924
Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona - Raton, New Mexico
834 miles



July 12, 1924
Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona
15 miles (on foot)


I got up at 5 a.m. and started down the Bright Angel Trail at 6 a.m. Walking the grade was very steep all the way and very hard to stay on your feet. The trail in places is only 3 feet wide and if you slip it means quite a drop. The trail to the halfway house is 3 1/2 miles and very steep. From there for about a mile the trail has only a slight grade and some level places, but from there to the bottom, which is 3 1/4 miles the trail is very narrow and steeper than the first. The grades are 35 to 45 percent grades. There is good spring water at the halfway house and at the bottom. I went down in 2 1/2 hours. The coloring and ruggedness of the canyon going down is beautiful and very hard to try to explain because anyone not seeing it cannot imagine its beauty.

The Colorado River at the bottom is a rushing torrent about 100 feet wide and in places 500 feet deep and very muddy. I got to the bottom about 8:30 a.m. and went in swimming for about an hour. I stayed at the river until 1 p.m. There were about 40 people who came down on mules and one man who walked but he was going to stay down 2 days to rest up for going back. I left the bottom at 1 p.m. and arrived at the top at 9 p.m. and it was some climb. The mules take 5 hours to come up. The trip down and coming up was very hard to make but I wouldn't take anything for my experiences on the trip. If I ever see the Grand Canyon in the future it will be from the top. The round trip was 14 7/8 miles and it seemed 114 7/8 miles before I got to the top. The people who go down on mules are about as tired and sore as I was when they got to the top. They use full grown mules to carry people.

Journal_final-81.jpg

Mules and touritsas getting ready to head down into the Canyon

Journal_final-75.jpg

Mules at the bottom of the Canyon

Journal_final-78.jpg

The Colorado River

July 13, 1924
Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona
40 miles


I got up this morning at 7 a.m. and was so stiff and sore I could hardly move, but I started out and saw the rest [there was] to see. I took the Hermit Rim Road to Hermit's Rest passing Hopi and Mohan points to the head of the Hermit Trail. I then took the road back to the El Tovar Hotel and took the trail around to Grandview Hotel and then to Hances Cabin. The trails I took gave me very good views of the best part of the canyon. I am camping tonight as last night, in the same place. In the afternoon I went and heard the Kolb Brothers lecture on their trip down the Colorado River through the canyon and also the Indians Dance in front of the El Tovar Hotel.

Journal_final-80.jpg

Indian dancers at the Tovar Hotel

Journal_final-82.jpg

Cowboy tour guide

July 14, 1924
Grand Canyon Park, Arizona to Holbrook, Arizona
186 miles


I left the park at 9:30 a.m. and went to Maine, Arizona, then took the National Highway east and had very rough roads most all the way. The road was hard all the way. Just before I came into Holbrook I had to go across a creek where a bridge was washed out. It was about 5 inches deep. I am camping out tonight.

July 15, 1924
Holbrook, Arizona to Datil, New Mexico
191 miles


I left Holbrook at 6 a.m. and went to the Petrified Forest, 18 miles from there. There is a road 2 miles long through the forest and they have a small museum in it. Some of the petrified trees are very large in diameter but all are broken in lengths of 5-15 feet. I got some pieces of the wood and sent some by mail home. The road was fairly good all the way except for the last five miles which was muddy. In several places I had to cross 6 inches of fast running water on the highway. This is the rainy season in this part of the country and I am liable to have rain most every day. I am camping tonight.

Journal_final-83.jpg

The Arizona-New Mexico State Line - Sponsored by the Becker Garage


July 16, 1924
Datil, New Mexico to Albuquerque, New Mexico
148 miles


I left Datil, New Mexico early and had a hard gravel road clear to Albuquerque except for a few sandy places. Most of the road followed the Rio Grande River. I arrived in Albuquerque at noon and worked on my motor cycle a couple of hours tightening it up. I am camping out tonight.

Journal_final-84.jpg

Phil's Indian Scout in Albuquerque

July 17, 1924
Albuquerque, New Mexico to Domingo, New Mexico
39 miles


I stayed in Albuquerque until 1:30 p.m. resting up and waiting to get some pictures that were being developed. Albuquerque is the largest city in New Mexico. The road here is fairly good. It started to rain when I got here, and it is very cloudy all around. The roads are all slippery. I am going to camp here tonight.

July 18, 1924
Domingo, New Mexico to Raton, New Mexico
215 miles
Elevation 6,666 feet


I left Domingo, New Mexico early on very muddy roads going over the La Bajada grade which is a long mountain pass with hair pin curves. After leaving Santa Fe I had hard roads but very rough through Las Vegas and Springer and then to Raton, New Mexico. I was stopped in Raton for speeding but talked the cop out of it. I am camping out tonight.

Journal_final-86.jpg

(From the back of this postcard) La Bajada is Spanish for "The Descent" or "The Drop" and descent or drop is certainly what it is, for it is a drop of about 800 feet from the rim of the mesa to the foot of the hill which makes a drop of about 1,000 feet to the lowland. The road, one and a half miles long, is one of the marvels of road building in America for it is cut out of volcanic lava in the face of an almost sheer precipice. It has 23 hair-pin turns, some of them having a very steep grade. In spite of all this the road is perfectly safe, as all the turns are widened to accommodate the largest automobiles, and those that might prove dangerous have stone retaining walls on the outside to prevent cars from going off the road and down the cliff. The trip up or down the La Bajada is always remembered by those going to or from the Pacific Coast over the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway.


###​
http://www.kevin-jolly.com
 
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July 19, 1924 - July 25, 1924

July 19, 1924 - July 25, 1924
Raton, New Mexico to Dixon, Illinois
1334 miles



July 19, 1924
Raton, New Mexico to Colorado Springs, Colorado
158 miles


I left Raton, New Mexico at 6 a.m. and went over Raton Pass which I thought was going to be hard pulling. I didn't have any trouble at all. It was a small hill compared to the mountain passes I have been over. The summit is 7,888 feet high. The roads today have been fairly good but rough in places. Arriving at Colorado Springs I saw Pikes Peak for the second time in the distance. It still has snow on the peak. I am camping out tonight.

Journal_final-91.jpg

At the The Continental Divide


July 20, 1924
Colorado Springs, Colorado, to Ft. Morgan, Colorado
166 miles


I left Colorado Springs at 9:00 a.m. and went to Denver and then took the DLD highway [Detroit-Lincoln-Denver] through by way of Brighton, Colorado to Ft. Morgan. At Brighton I turned my back on the Rocky Mountains where I have had the best part of my trip. Leaving these mountains and the country west of them was just like leaving an old friend. I could see them for quite a long ways, but the last 15 miles I could not even make out their outlines. I am now on the prairie but at a high altitude. I am camping out tonight.

Journal_final-94.jpg

Leaving behind the Rocky Mountains

July 21, 1924
Ft. Morgan, Colorado to McCook, Nebraska
216 miles


I left Ft. Morgan early and had fairly good roads until I got to the Colorado, Nebraska state line. From the state line [to] here I had very rough roads and some mud with deep water holes. In Nebraska here it is harvest time and they have wheat fields miles long. I had a spill today but I'm not hurt much. I am camping tonight.

July 22, 1924
McCook Nebraska to Lincoln, Nebraska
260 miles


I left McCook at 5:00 a.m. and had very rough roads for 150 miles. In one place I had mud and water 2 feet deep. The last 100 miles was fairly good. This is Nebraska's rainy season and I am very lucky to find the roads as good as they are. They had a flood here about a week ago and it is just drying up. I hope to be in Iowa tomorrow night. If it has been raining recently I will have bad roads there too. I am camping tonight.

Journal_final-95.jpg

The DLD Highway outside of Lincoln


July 23, 1924
Lincoln, Nebraska to Jefferson, Iowa
225 miles


I left Lincoln early on the D.L.D. highway and went to Omaha, Nebraska and crossed the Missouri River into Iowa. Earlier I crossed the Platte River in Nebraska. The roads have been very rough but no mud. There have been a few stretches of paving, about 30 miles in all. I am camping tonight. My motorcycle is running better than ever. There has been a lot of detouring today and I had to go about 35 miles out of the way.

July 24, 1924
Jefferson, Iowa to Cedar Falls, Iowa
175 miles


It rained all of last night hard but I had shelter and did not get wet. It made the roads very muddy and slippery, but I started out at 10 a.m. and made fairly good time considering the condition of the roads. I took one right hard spill but [it] did not hurt much. I sprained my wrist, but it will be all right in a couple of days I guess. I am camping tonight. I had several detours today.

July 25, 1924
Cedar Falls, Iowa to Dixon, Illinois
134 miles


I left Cedar Falls about 10 a.m. and had rough roads until I got to Clinton, Iowa. From Clinton I crossed the Mississippi River into Illinois. I am now on paved roads and will have [them] almost all the rest of my trip. Where I crossed the Mississippi the river is about 1/2 mile wide and right deep. I am camping tonight.

Journal_final-85.jpg

He pretty much has stopped taking pictures or buying postcards now - so what the **** - an Adobe in New Mexico

###​

http://www.kevin-jolly.com
 
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July 26, 1924 - July 31, 1924 - The End

July 26, 1924 - July 31, 1924
Dixon, Illinois - Niagara Falls, New York
740 mile



Chicago Heights, Ill
July 26, 1924

Dear Pop and Ma:

I have sent a card but I will try and write a little more. I received the letters saying you had got the stuff I sent. They were the first letters I got since leaving Los Angeles. So far the whole trip has been even better than I expected it would turn out. I was very lucky coming across Nebraska and Iowa because I had very little rain. The roads were very muddy but not half as bad as they generally are at this time of the year. I took the DLD highway from Denver thru Omaha, Nebr. instead of the Lincoln Highway. [It] was flooded with 6 inches to 2 ft. of water for several miles and all mud the rest of the way. The mud here is different from eastern mud as it cannot be washed off, it has to be cut off in cakes. It is mostly Gumbo. My motor-cycle several times had been in rivers running across the road 2 feet deep but [it doesn’t] seem to hurt it. Sometimes the water washes sand in the carburetor but it can be taken apart easily.
I think, as it is not very many hundred miles out of my way, I will go on up to Niagara Falls and then I can say I have seen most all to be seen in this country. I think I'll start sometime tomorrow and take it along slow and be there about Aug. 6 or 7th. I hear the roads are fairly good all the way to the Falls except a few places. I don't know exactly the route I'll take but I guess it will be by way of Toledo, Ohio, Cleveland, Erie and Buffalo.
I hope you can go up to the Falls Aug. 7 and stay a week. I think I can easily get there before that, and as [there] is nothing to hang around here for I might as well start rolling again. It seems if I don't run a couple hundred miles every day I don't know what to do with myself. All the country around here is level and about the same as Balto: I saw the first Md. car near Flagstaff, Arizona and one today near here.
They are the only MD cars I have seen on the trip. The car I saw in Arizona belongs down at 724 East 21st St. Both cars were going in the opposite direction from me but I turned around and caught them to see what part of MD they were from, and hear their troubles. Between broken springs, blowed out tires, and burnt out bearings touring is a pleasure to Easterners, and it seems they all have a little of each trouble, but my motor-cycle so far has given me very little trouble, and seems to run as good now as when I started.
Address all letters to Niagara Falls, N.Y. (General Delivery) and say in them when you will leave Aug. 7, and what time you will arrive at the Falls and I will try to meet you.
I will close hoping to see you Aug. 7.
Your Son,
Phil
PS. As soon as you get this address a letter to me General Delivery, Cleveland Ohio, and say whether you will be there.





July 26, 1924
Dixon, Illinois to Chicago Heights, Illinois
140 miles


I left Dixon, Illinois about 11:00 a.m. and had good roads except for two detours. I went past Mooseheart, Illinois - the Moose home - and it is a pretty place. I called at the Post Office here and got a lot of letters. Motor running fine. I am camping tonight.

July 27, 1924
Chicago Heights, Illinois to South Bend, Indiana
90 miles


I left Chicago Heights about 11:00 a.m. on the Lincoln Highway and had good paved roads except for a detour of 15 miles that was sandy and rough. I only ran 4 hours today as from now [on] I have plenty of time if my motor keeps running as it is now. I am going to be at Niagara Falls by August 7 to meet Pop and Ma. I am camping tonight.

July, 28, 1924
South Bend, Indiana to Edgerton, Ohio
95 miles


I left South Bend at noon after being in the rain most all night. I was in a tent but got a little wet. The road was all paved except 40 miles of good gravel roads from the Lincoln Highway north to the Ohio line. I am camping out tonight.

Journal_final-98.jpg

Just a postcard here - Phil didn't take any pictures between Nebraska and Niagara Falls.

July 29, 1924
Edgerton, Ohio to Toledo, Ohio
105 miles


I left Edgerton about 8:30 a.m. and had good paved roads all the way here. I stopped a while at the Y.M.C.A. and took a swim and workout in the gym, and then went up to a resort on Lake Erie and stayed a while. I am camping a little north of Toledo tonight.

Journal_final-99.jpg

Phil's parents at Niagara Falls - his dad was a Baltimore city cop.

July 30, 1924
Toledo, Ohio to Erie, Pennsylvania
200 miles


I left Toledo early after a night of rain and mud. The roads were fine all the way being paved with only two short detours. I arrived at Cleveland, Ohio about 4:00 p.m. and received a letter from Pop and Ma and I telegraphed them to meet me tomorrow at Niagara Falls. I am only about 100 miles from the Falls so I can easily make it in the morning if nothing happens. I am camping tonight.

Journal_final-1_2.jpg

Phil at Niagara Falls. He did ride his Indian home from there, but didn't keep a journal or anything. It guess it probably didn't seem like much of a ride after what he'd just finished.

July 31, 1924
Erie, Pennsylvania to Niagara Falls, New York
110 miles


I left Erie at 3:30 this morning and got here about 4:30 p.m. It rained continually all the way and made it very slippery and hard to ride. I took a spill near North East, Pennsylvania and hurt my back and did not break anything I don't think. I came here to [the] Y.M.C.A. and took a swim and feel better. It has been a tough day but my season is through.

Journal_final-101.jpg

This is a letter Phil sent home from San Francisco. He asked his mother to save his letters and postcards so he could put them in a book. I'm glad we could do that, and really appreciate everyone that's been reading these posts. I imagine that Phil's getting a kick out of it as well.

###​

Thanks - everyone.
http://www.kevin-jolly.com
 
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Kevin, that is an awesome read! I am also from Baltimore originally and am curious, are you related to Wayne Jolly from Baltimore? Or actually, any of the Jollys from Randallstown, Hilmar Road?
 
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Jeff --

I don't think so - Phil was my wife's grandfather - my father's family comes from North Carolina.

Kevin
 
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:thumb: :thumb:

Ok, you've got my interest. Bookmarked, and ready for the next installment. Simply amazing stuff. Thanks to Phil for having the forsight to keep a journal, and thanks to Kevin for sharing!
 
Joined
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Messages
249
Location
Amarillo, TX
I cannot thank you enough for the postings. We lost my father-in-law last year. He was 90. I used to love to listen to his stories of stormin' around Texas on his old Indian. I like to think that those of us still riding have a bit of Phil and Leroy still in us. Great story.
 
M

Mike in Clear Lake

Wow! I'd like to see the route taken.

I don't believe the US highway system was even in place at that time, so this must have taken some innovation. Five years prior, in 1919, a young Army officer named Dwight Eisenhower would participate in a country-wide survey with a convoy of Army vehicles to study this very problem. He would sign the funding for the Interstate system decades later when he became President.
 
Joined
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I cannot thank you enough for the postings. We lost my father-in-law last year. He was 90. I used to love to listen to his stories of stormin' around Texas on his old Indian. I like to think that those of us still riding have a bit of Phil and Leroy still in us. Great story.
Sorry you lost Leroy, we all lose a little something every time one of those guys goes.
 
Joined
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Wow! I'd like to see the route taken.

I don't believe the US highway system was even in place at that time, so this must have taken some innovation. Five years prior, in 1919, a young Army officer named Dwight Eisenhower would participate in a country-wide survey with a convoy of Army vehicles to study this very problem. He would sign the funding for the Interstate system decades later when he became President.
Mike --

I'm in the process of tracing out Phil's 1924 route and mapping it onto today's roads (hopefully to ride it). In 1924 in the Eastern half of the country (more or less to St Louis), most of the major intercity routes were hard-surfaced - concrete, brick, macadam). It looks like Phil followed the route of the National Old Trail. Before 1927 most "Highways" were really just routes. A highway asssociation - supported by businesses in towns along the route - would put up marker poles and mileage signs (and print tourist brochures and maps) - but they didn't build or maintain the roads - that was done by cities and states. The HQ of the National Old Trail Association was in Kansas City. I've got Phil's route traced out to Kansas now, if I ever get organized I'm going to put it up on my web site.

Kevin
 
M

Mike in Clear Lake

Mike --

I'm in the process of tracing out Phil's 1924 route and mapping it onto today's roads (hopefully to ride it). In 1924 in the Eastern half of the country (more or less to St Louis), most of the major intercity routes were hard-surfaced - concrete, brick, macadam). It looks like Phil followed the route of the National Old Trail. Before 1927 most "Highways" were really just routes. A highway asssociation - supported by businesses in towns along the route - would put up marker poles and mileage signs (and print tourist brochures and maps) - but they didn't build or maintain the roads - that was done by cities and states. The HQ of the National Old Trail Association was in Kansas City. I've got Phil's route traced out to Kansas now, if I ever get organized I'm going to put it up on my web site.

Kevin
I am really very truly interested in this, and have always been interested in the early transportation systems in the US, canals/rivers, trains, and roads. I am interested in your work, so please keep me informed.

Thanks,

Mike
 
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I am interested in the route as well. I made a trek to L.A. and back myself a few years ago, however it was on the interstate system and in a Corvette, but it was still a journey of a lifetime and would do it all over again in a heartbeat. Maybe next time it will be on two wheels.
 
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When I get something together I'll post it up.

One of the things I've been thinking about is to ride the route of the Old Spanish Trail (OST) here in Texas. The OST association was HQd in San Antonio, and their papers, etc are at Our Lady of the Lake.



The OST ran from FLA to CA (kind of sort of along where IH-10 runs today), here in Texas it ran from Beaumont to El Paso. Until you get to around Sonora there are still old alignments of the road that aren't on IH-10, past Sonora it's just disconnected segments - but a lot of interesting old roads out there.

Kevin
 
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I'm building web pages from my wife's grandfather's journal of his motorcycle trips cross-country in 1924 - and I thought you guys might be interested.

May 30, 1924 - June 5, 1924
Balitmore, Maryland to Marshall, Missouri
1033 miles

A kinder and gentler nation, back then. This is just wonderful.

Have you cross posted on Adventure Rider? Phil's trip was surely an adventure!


Lee
 
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Thank you for taking the time to write this. I will keep on watching and reading.
 
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