• Welcome to the Two Wheeled Texans community! Feel free to hang out and lurk as long as you like. However, we would like to encourage you to register so that you can join the community and use the numerous features on the site. After registering, don't forget to post up an introduction!

Best Advice you have received that improved your riding

R

Red Brown

Hey...what has been the few things that have really improved your riding?

For me it is really four things...

It is not the bike nor tires... it's you.

Forget performance parts for your bike when you can't even ride it to its potential stock.

Take the MSF class.

Stay away from cliffs. :trust:

RB
 
Joined
Jan 11, 2007
Messages
531
Location
Sugar Land
1) Keep your eyes on the curve head..look up!

2) Everyone is out to get you so make allowances and give yourself an out.

3) Not every day is a good day to ride. Listen to warnings going off in your head and don't ride if you feel squidgy.
 
Joined
Dec 29, 2007
Messages
318
Location
Riesel
Best advice I've gotten for riding (and shooting, coincidentally): Keep your eyes on the target

I had a b of a time getting around corners until a riding buddy of mine told me to just look where I wanted to go, and the bike would follow. Sure enough, it works quite well, and I find myself hitting corners a lot more confidently.
 
Joined
May 6, 2003
Messages
1,661
Location
Ada, OK
1) Look where you want to go. Eliminate target fixation.

2) Let loose of that death grip on the bars. Relax your hands and focus more on "pushing" on the bars rather than pulling on them.

3) Ear plugs! It took me awhile to acclimate to them, but once I did it allowed me to concentrate and focus so much better. I feel that they help reduce fatigue on long rides also.
 

TWTim

Forum Supporter
Joined
Feb 19, 2007
Messages
9,907
Location
Midland
"Good decision-making is more important while riding than in just about any other area of life."

-- Chief MSF Instructor Fred Barney (The guy who taught me how to teach)
 
Joined
Apr 13, 2008
Messages
333
Location
Burleson
Ok all the obvious stuff has been covered.


I revelation to me was "Get off the seat"


Weighting the inside of the bike and decreasing the amount of lean needed to complete a turn (or allow you to go faster through the same turn ;-) ) made a huge difference in my riding
 
Joined
Feb 5, 2008
Messages
300
Location
Magnolia Springs
Ok all the obvious stuff has been covered.


I revelation to me was "Get off the seat"


Weighting the inside of the bike and decreasing the amount of lean needed to complete a turn (or allow you to go faster through the same turn ;-) ) made a huge difference in my riding

Same here. Decreasing the lean angle helps confidence, and makes being faster easier.
 
Joined
Oct 13, 2007
Messages
2,034
Location
Georgetown,TX.
I learned the hard way dirt biking that when you come up fast -too fast to stop on a log or tree laying across your path, Brake till your almost at it then gas it and most of the time you will jump over it without eating the ground like a dragline, Too old for dirtbikes now but that trick saved me from certain doom more than once.
 
Joined
Dec 5, 2005
Messages
65
Location
Georgetown
Good question.

Ride your ride.

If you're riding with people with a higher skill level or better equipment, don't try to keep up. Ride your ride.
 

KenH

Inactive Member
Forum Supporter
Joined
Feb 18, 2007
Messages
11,737
Location
Lost in space
1. Ride chicken.

2. Ride with people that don't fall down.

3. The bike rides better than you do.

4) It isn't good enough to recognize an obstacle, choose a line over or around the obstacle, then execute that line. Riding is not a step-by-step endeavor. Instead, be aware of the riding environment and ride the best route in the present moment.

5. Don't be afraid to stop and think about your options.

6. Apex cornering is fine on a race track, but sucks on blind curves on the street. Instead, imagine the lane is divided in thirds. Ride with your tires on the line between the outside and middle thirds. This will keep you away from oncoming traffic, even if they are over the line, avoids most gravel and grease in the middle of the lane, provides better visibility of the road surface ahead, and gives you room to manuever if necessary.
 
Joined
Jun 26, 2007
Messages
150
Location
Richardson
"You are invisible to half of the cagers out there and the other half want to run you over."
My MSF instructor said that in the first 10 minutes of our class.
 
Joined
Apr 13, 2008
Messages
1,275
Location
Waller
1) Don't hit anything
2) Keep the rubber on the down side
3) Bring the bike back the same way you left with it
 
Joined
Oct 13, 2007
Messages
2,034
Location
Georgetown,TX.
OK-Get the BIG picture, Keep your eyes moving, check your mirrors every 10 sec. Leave yourself an out, Make sure they see you if possible but ride like they dont. Dont linger in other drivers blind spots. Look for light runners when coming to an intersection, People running late for work will KILL you and then be MAD because you are making them late by being pinned under there car.
 
Joined
Jul 12, 2005
Messages
10,889
Location
Cleburne, TX
Aside from looking where you want to go, its gotta be this one:

Cagers never see you. Those that do see you are aiming. :wary:
 
Joined
Mar 28, 2005
Messages
3,002
Location
Houston, Texas
Concentrate on practicing countersteering everytime you are on the bike until it becomes second nature.

I had a tough time with this when I first started riding and I would go out and specifically concentrate on countersteering just to change lanes or move from side to side in my lane until it became ingrained in my muscles.

This has saved my butt more than once when something unexpected happened and I needed to swerve quickly to avoid trouble.
 

Tourmeister

Keeper of the Asylum
Admin
Joined
Feb 28, 2003
Messages
45,765
Location
Huntsville
Practice does NOT make perfect! It makes permanent.

So it is critical to practice the right habits instead of bad habits.
 
Joined
Apr 5, 2005
Messages
707
Location
Nassau Bay, TX
"Good decision-making is more important while riding than in just about any other area of life."

-- Chief MSF Instructor Fred Barney
Fred is a great guy, sort of a Zen master of motorcycling.:zen:

I've always liked the phase "Ride your own ride." keeps your head around you and your individual capabilities.
 

h2000fb

Forum Supporter
Joined
Nov 21, 2006
Messages
2,337
Location
Crawford, TX
Best advice I've gotten for riding (and shooting, coincidentally): Keep your eyes on the target

I had a b of a time getting around corners until a riding buddy of mine told me to just look where I wanted to go, and the bike would follow. Sure enough, it works quite well, and I find myself hitting corners a lot more confidently.
DITTO!!
 
Joined
Jan 9, 2008
Messages
1,152
Location
Las Colinas, Texas
At the Msf course, the countersteering advice and tips like always being in 1st gear at a stop in case some moron comes speeding from up behind you so you at least have a chance to move out of the way. I also got great tips and a refresher there.
 
Joined
Dec 28, 2007
Messages
488
Location
Baytown Tx.
#1 Look where you want to go, not at what you want to avoid. (Target fixation.)

#2 Look in your rearview mirrors when at a stop and leave yourself an out. (The guy who bought my first Z-1 from me was killed on it while sitting at a red light. A drunk driver hit him from behind.)

#3 Look through the vehicle in front of you to see what's happening ahead. You'll get a head start on braking if something is happening ahead.

#4 Never ride in another vehicles blind spot. If you can't see his eyes in his mirrors, he can't see you.

#5 Ride with a "healthy paranoia" they are out to get you.

#6 Learn to ride dirt bikes. You learn so much more about "bike dynamics" and control on the dirt compared to street only. Plus it usually hurts less to crash on dirt! LOL!

Kevin
 

Tourmeister

Keeper of the Asylum
Admin
Joined
Feb 28, 2003
Messages
45,765
Location
Huntsville
Don't trust a gps to give an accurate depiction of where a road goes if you are unsure based on visual cues... It could cost you your life. Better to slow down until you can be certain based on facts on the ground.
 
Joined
Feb 15, 2006
Messages
2,502
Location
Huntsville,Tx
From the man who introduced me to street bikes. This was part of his safety speech to me over 20 years ago and I still think of it often.

"always remember, your a mouse in a cats world"

karr collins-(passed on now, was 71 when he was pulled over for doing 140-something on his CBR1000 in OK. Cop told him he wouldn't write the ticket because the judge wouldn't believe him. man, I miss Karr)
 
Last edited:

jbh

Joined
Dec 2, 2005
Messages
739
Location
Fort Worth
1. "Go where you're looking"

2. "In slow, out fast. In fast, out backwards."
I like number 2. It is easier to speed up in a corner than slow down quickly leaned way over.

But as said before, ride your own ride, riding beyond your ability will not impress anyone in the group you are in.
 
Joined
Dec 13, 2003
Messages
395
Location
Fort Worth
When you've gone into a curve too fast, the motorcycle will lean further than you think it will. The tires can grip better than you think they can. Just keep looking through the curve and leaning just a bit more. It's better to lean too far, lowside and slide off of the road than it is to brake, stand the bike up and run off of the road or highside.
 

TXRider60

My Email is Dead!
Joined
Sep 23, 2007
Messages
204
Location
Quail Valley
"If you're too tired or distracted to concentrate on the ride, find another way to handle the commute (take the cage, call a cab, or walk)."
 
Top