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Best Advice you have received that improved your riding

Tourmeister

Keeper of the Asylum
Admin
Joined
Feb 28, 2003
Messages
47,008
Location
Huntsville
First Name
Scott
Last Name
Friday
Practice does NOT make perfect! It makes permanent.

So it is critical to practice the right habits instead of bad habits.
 
Joined
Apr 5, 2005
Messages
708
Location
Nassau Bay, TX
First Name
David
Last Name
Dietrich
"Good decision-making is more important while riding than in just about any other area of life."

-- Chief MSF Instructor Fred Barney
Fred is a great guy, sort of a Zen master of motorcycling.:zen:

I've always liked the phase "Ride your own ride." keeps your head around you and your individual capabilities.
 

h2000fb

Forum Supporter
Joined
Nov 21, 2006
Messages
2,383
Location
Crawford, TX
First Name
Tom
Last Name
Ramsey
Best advice I've gotten for riding (and shooting, coincidentally): Keep your eyes on the target

I had a b of a time getting around corners until a riding buddy of mine told me to just look where I wanted to go, and the bike would follow. Sure enough, it works quite well, and I find myself hitting corners a lot more confidently.
DITTO!!
 
Joined
Jan 9, 2008
Messages
1,163
Location
Las Colinas, Texas
First Name
Mark
At the Msf course, the countersteering advice and tips like always being in 1st gear at a stop in case some moron comes speeding from up behind you so you at least have a chance to move out of the way. I also got great tips and a refresher there.
 

Squeaky

2
Forum Supporter
Joined
Mar 6, 2004
Messages
13,258
Location
Katy
First Name
Rebecca
Last Name
Nelson
RIDE YOUR OWN RIDE!

And if you can't, ride alone.
 
Joined
Dec 28, 2007
Messages
488
Location
Baytown Tx.
First Name
Kevin
Last Name
Bjork
#1 Look where you want to go, not at what you want to avoid. (Target fixation.)

#2 Look in your rearview mirrors when at a stop and leave yourself an out. (The guy who bought my first Z-1 from me was killed on it while sitting at a red light. A drunk driver hit him from behind.)

#3 Look through the vehicle in front of you to see what's happening ahead. You'll get a head start on braking if something is happening ahead.

#4 Never ride in another vehicles blind spot. If you can't see his eyes in his mirrors, he can't see you.

#5 Ride with a "healthy paranoia" they are out to get you.

#6 Learn to ride dirt bikes. You learn so much more about "bike dynamics" and control on the dirt compared to street only. Plus it usually hurts less to crash on dirt! LOL!

Kevin
 
Joined
Mar 1, 2003
Messages
2,882
Location
Upstate SC
First Name
Albert
Last Name
Schilling
Do a track day. I learned more in one day on the track then 10 years of riding on the street.
 

Tourmeister

Keeper of the Asylum
Admin
Joined
Feb 28, 2003
Messages
47,008
Location
Huntsville
First Name
Scott
Last Name
Friday
Don't trust a gps to give an accurate depiction of where a road goes if you are unsure based on visual cues... It could cost you your life. Better to slow down until you can be certain based on facts on the ground.
 
Joined
Feb 15, 2006
Messages
2,513
Location
Huntsville,Tx
First Name
Jack or
Last Name
Cope
From the man who introduced me to street bikes. This was part of his safety speech to me over 20 years ago and I still think of it often.

"always remember, your a mouse in a cats world"

karr collins-(passed on now, was 71 when he was pulled over for doing 140-something on his CBR1000 in OK. Cop told him he wouldn't write the ticket because the judge wouldn't believe him. man, I miss Karr)
 
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jbh

Joined
Dec 2, 2005
Messages
756
Location
Fort Worth
First Name
Brad
Last Name
Henderson
1. "Go where you're looking"

2. "In slow, out fast. In fast, out backwards."
I like number 2. It is easier to speed up in a corner than slow down quickly leaned way over.

But as said before, ride your own ride, riding beyond your ability will not impress anyone in the group you are in.
 
Joined
Dec 13, 2003
Messages
395
Location
Fort Worth
When you've gone into a curve too fast, the motorcycle will lean further than you think it will. The tires can grip better than you think they can. Just keep looking through the curve and leaning just a bit more. It's better to lean too far, lowside and slide off of the road than it is to brake, stand the bike up and run off of the road or highside.
 

TXRider60

My Email is Dead!
Joined
Sep 23, 2007
Messages
204
Location
Quail Valley
First Name
Burt
"If you're too tired or distracted to concentrate on the ride, find another way to handle the commute (take the cage, call a cab, or walk)."
 
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