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Best month for Texas to Colorado

Joined
Aug 28, 2016
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Recalculating
September benefits - no tourists and lessened construction. There is a broader range of temperature when you get to the northern half of Colorado. The dividing line tends to be IH70.

Snow doesn't last, but it does make for a memorable ride.

RB
 
Joined
May 22, 2013
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Thorndale, tx
First Name
Ed
Last Name
Baker
It almost always snows 6-8" in late Sept. Quickly melts and you are good through October at least. I've camped the high country many times late fall, and been cold on a number of them :-) And my home was at 8300'.
 
Joined
Jan 7, 2019
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Humble, TX
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Stephen
I have driven and RVed that many many times, never road it on a bike though, probably been mountain camping in the New Mexico/Colorado area 50 times at least. Whats so messed up is its so low and flat in Texas, and the Gulf Coast with the warm air, you will be sweating halfway, and then when you get into New Mexico you start hitting snow in the Northern parts, not sure which way your going. Amarillo seems to be the wind/cold crossover region, and thats the plateau plains area of Texas and thats when it will start to get cold and windy. I think don't wait any longer than September or you will have snow if you plan on any mountain riding.

I live in Houston also but I always remember Colorado and New Mexico giving me a scare in the mountains from the snow and ice and I usually go in December, sometime November. I have slid plenty in a big truck and RV but they are heavy and sliding is fairly predictable, what will happen I mean, like how far it will slide. For me avoiding any freezing water, ice or snow at all costs would be paramount. I live in Houston, and have never ridden a bike on ice or snow, and just from truck experience in it I would totally avoid it until I get more experience with it on a bike, which maybe never. I mean, if I lived up there, yeh I could go out and practice but in Houston, I am not going to go anywhere 1000's of miles to "practice" snow, so that means I will never have good snow ability so I would avoid it. "Know your limits" is the best advice. However, it would be totally worth it if NO snow because its beautiful ride, just not through Texas.
 
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