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Bike maintenance. The Flinstone approach

Joined
Jun 8, 2004
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The Woodlands, TX
It was long due so I did a full maintenance on the CBR. This is the list of the repairs and some of the homemade utensils used:

Front Forks: Replace seals, new springs new oil. Tool: PVC pipe as bearing driver, syringe and vinil tubing for oil leveling tool.
Valve check:
Carb cleaning
Carburator sync. Tool: home made $15 carb sync.
Replace oil.
Replace Coolant
New Spark plugs.
New Ram Air filters

This is the material used for the Carb sync.

DSC_9001.jpg


this is how it looked like at 1500rpm. The fluid id Auto transmission fluid.

DSC_9009.jpg


This is after sync.

DSC_9010.jpg


These are the helpers:

P1030028.jpg


P1030030.jpg


I am please to inform that I was able to put the bike back together and that now runs better than ever. The problem is that since I was not able to do all this at once I didn't run the CBR for a long time. I think that I need a new battery. First time i took it out I had to ask a guy on the gas station for a push start. :giveup: (Scott, stop laughing)


On a side note, and following the Fintstone approach. this is how I changed the tires on the V-strom.

DSC_9205.jpg
 

Duke

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Re: Bike maintenance. The Flindstone approach

That there is a very creative Bead Breaker. Have you concidered marketing it?:lol2:
 
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Re: Bike maintenance. The Flindstone approach

Very good and inexpensive approach you have there .Awesome helpers you have there too. Well if you know what you are doing like yourself it would be fine, me thats another story I would be taking the bike in parts that I dismantled over to the local repair shop with an embarrasing smile to be put back together :mrgreen:

Mark
 

Bob Dahringer

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Re: Bike maintenance. The Flindstone approach

Iv'e used the same method breaking my tires down, but use the spoked wheels on my truck as the anchor point. (just like your neighbor has there in the background :trust: )
Great pit crew
bobzilla
 
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Re: Bike maintenance. The Flindstone approach

I myself am very interested to know exactly how you did the carb sync tool, since I am in dire need to sync my carbs on my f2 but haven't got the money to nor want to take it to a shop to do it. I've been guessing that it isn't too hard with the right tools and knowing what you are doing..... :giveup:
 
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Re: Bike maintenance. The Flindstone approach

very nice...I like the bead breaker and carb stick approach. Now I wonder why I have all the fancy stuff in my shop:-)
 

kurt

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Re: Bike maintenance. The Flindstone approach

I'm often amazed at the lengths people will go to avoid purchasing the correct tools. Yabba-Dabba-Doo! :rofl:
 
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Re: Bike maintenance. The Flindstone approach

That there is a very creative Bead Breaker. Have you concidered marketing it?:lol2:
Nah, the shipping would be a killer.

FZ6biker said:
...I would be taking the bike in parts that I dismantled over to the local repair shop with an embarrasing smile to be put back together
That was certainly a possibility in my case also. There is always a first step to learn to walk.

Tourmeister said:
:thpt:


newskilz said:
I myself am very interested to know exactly how you did the carb sync tool
It is pretty simple. As seen in the first picture clear tubbing and water dripping watering accessories from Home Depot. In the case of the CBR I was able to use the straigh connector to plug in the admision intake of the engine. You will need the shop manual of your bike or look for an on-line tutorial.

Once you fill with the fluid, you will have to tap the bubble and let it rest for a while. You do not want any bubbles.

DSC_9004.jpg


txmedic said:
I'm often amazed at the lengths people will go to avoid purchasing the correct tools. Yabba-Dabba-Doo!
Three words: "budget" and "personal satisfaction". In lots of cases the right tool is not only the professional one. I find great satisfaction doing my own maintenance. The carb sync tool it is just a differential manometer I din't feel the need to pay $150 for something I will be sing once every several years.

Or in one word: Yabba-Dabba-Doo!
 
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Re: Bike maintenance. The Flindstone approach

I love that bead breaker. You just got an official BS in Redneck Engineering. With a little duct tape you could have received a Masters. :rofl:
 
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Re: Bike maintenance. The Flindstone approach

It is pretty simple. As seen in the first picture clear tubbing and water dripping watering accessories from Home Depot. In the case of the CBR I was able to use the straigh connector to plug in the admision intake of the engine. You will need the shop manual of your bike or look for an on-line tutorial.

Once you fill with the fluid, you will have to tap the bubble and let it rest for a while. You do not want any bubbles.

DSC_9004.jpg
:scratch: Hmmm, me thinks I might understand how you did this now. I have a manual already and I'm guessing when you said you used the straight connector to plug in to the carb you were saying a piece that would normally plug two pieces of that clear piping together. Thanks for the tips.
 
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Re: Bike maintenance. The Flindstone approach

:scratch: Hmmm, me thinks I might understand how you did this now. I have a manual already and I'm guessing when you said you used the straight connector to plug in to the carb you were saying a piece that would normally plug two pieces of that clear piping together. Thanks for the tips.
Yes, under the carburetors you have four pieces of black tubing. I used the strigh connectors to join each black tubing with the clear ones.

Just make sure you do not have any leaks. If you got any air on the system your engine will suck the fluid. The first time you try, get your thumb ready on the kill switch.
 

Bob Dahringer

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Re: Bike maintenance. The Flindstone approach

I'm often amazed at the lengths people will go to avoid purchasing the correct tools.


Three words: "budget" and "personal satisfaction". In lots of cases the right tool is not only the professional one.

I'm with you on this Raul; I make tools all the time and have no qualms about modifying store bought tools either.
If you have the ability and a little imagination you can save a bit of coin going the Flintstone route.
bobzilla:thumb:
 
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kurt

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I hear you on making the tools. I recently converted a 13/16" spark plug socket into a 22mm axle tool. Couldn't find a 22mm hex bit in anything but 3/4" drive. Storing a sheet of peg board vs. spending $30 for a real gauge is just humorous to me. I applaud the creativity.
 
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I am quite happy with my twin max after using carb sticks for decades...what I really like were a matched set of dampened, fluild filled bourdon tube gages, one per cylinder, and would like another set of them:-)
 

kurt

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Hey Raul, surely someone who puts his tools on peg board would require a proper Morgan CarbTune II. :-P
 
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I hear you on making the tools. I recently converted a 13/16" spark plug socket into a 22mm axle tool. Couldn't find a 22mm hex bit in anything but 3/4" drive. Storing a sheet of peg board vs. spending $30 for a real gauge is just humorous to me. I applaud the creativity.
I don't plan to store that peg board. It was something I had availble at that time. I am only going to keep the tubing and the connectors in the attic. Hopefully next time I need I'll remember where thay are.

This was the first time I synchronize carburetors. It seemed easier to compare all four at once than using one vacuum gauge on each. How hard is it using a gauge?
 
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Crockett
You've given me the confidence to finish putting my DIY carb sticks together. I've got the tubing, connectors and atf fluid. Seeing yours gives me hope it can be done. Hopefully not having a kill switch any more won't hinder my progress.
 
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Oklahoma City, OK
I don't plan to store that peg board. It was something I had availble at that time. I am only going to keep the tubing and the connectors in the attic. Hopefully next time I need I'll remember where thay are.

This was the first time I synchronize carburetors. It seemed easier to compare all four at once than using one vacuum gauge on each. How hard is it using a gauge?
Don't use one, get this and see them all at once.

http://www.z1enterprises.com/detail.aspx?ID=2727

 
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