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Dual-sport adventure in New Mexico late May

Joined
May 18, 2005
Messages
587
Location
Plano, TX
#1
Hello,
I am starting to plan a week-long trip to NM in late May or early June. I am somewhat flexible with the dates but I probably don't want to go after mid June.

The idea would be to do a couple of sections of the NMBDR and the rest on paved roads. My thinking is that I have limited time and I a mostly interested in scenery more than tons of off-road travel - would want to pick the most beautiful sections of the NMBDR and skip the rest. My plan to is to ride from Dallas to Carlsbad or Cloudcroft and start the NM section of the trip there. Want to do the last section from Cuba to Antoñito and probably the one from Wilson to Reserve.

I welcome company - if you're interested let me know and we can plan together. My motorcycle will be my wr250r, so I can't do high-speed highway even to get to NM. If someone has a trailer and wants to trailer the bikes to NM, I am fine with that, and we share expenses.

If I go alone I'd camp a 2-3 nights in pretty places, but not every night. With company we can discuss what makes sense - camping is not critical and I can skip it altogether.

Draft itinerary
This route has two complete NMBDR days plus some other unpaved riding the other days. I couldn't fit it in one week because I need 2 days to get there and back. Comments/feedback welcome!
 
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Joined
Apr 8, 2015
Messages
374
Location
Burleson, Texas
#4
I’d love to do the NMBDR again (and finish this time). Going to be in OK/ AR at that time. But, if anything changes...


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Joined
May 18, 2005
Messages
587
Location
Plano, TX
#6
I’d love to do the NMBDR again (and finish this time). Going to be in OK/ AR at that time. But, if anything changes...
Thank you! So you've done the NMBDR already! That's great! I may have some questions for you.... if anything changes about your availability, please let me know!

Also have a WR. Would love to go. Only have a single rail trailer tho.
Thanks for your interest! Let's start talking via email.
 
Joined
May 18, 2005
Messages
587
Location
Plano, TX
#8
I might be interested. Would the Strom be suitable for the BDR sections ?
Great! Let's chat. The Strom should be fine for most sections, but there are sections with deep sand, which could turn to mud that would be challenging on a big bike, but probably ok on a 650. I want to avoid those anyway. There is also a technical segment from Winston to Reserve that can be bypassed, but it's probably doable on a midsize dualsport.

I don't want to suffer through sand, mud or huge rocks - my goal is to have fun and not to break a leg! :rider:
 

misterk

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Jul 21, 2015
Messages
858
Location
Colleyville
#10
I might be able to swing this, cant commit yet. I will be on an Africa Twin. I mostly camp.


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Joined
Jan 8, 2009
Messages
151
Location
Paradise
#12
I could be in, depends on the weekend. XR650l with camping gear. I like the sand, mud and big rocks. I just need to know the mileage so I can make a tire choice ahead of time.
 
Joined
Mar 26, 2017
Messages
72
Location
Dallas
#15
I'm not familiar with NM in general, but I've spent a good bit of time in Taos County. I *always* try to have a meal at Orlando's in Taos when I'm there. I've been wanting to ride my Super Tenere out there, but haven't done it yet. I own a little tract of land with sage (chamiso!) on it where I've done a good bit of car camping near Questa. If you end up going in the first full week of June, maybe I could meet you in Taos County. While it would be fun to join you for the full trip, the NMBDR is probably too much for my Super Tenere and my skills.
 
Joined
May 18, 2005
Messages
587
Location
Plano, TX
#16
I'm not familiar with NM in general, but I've spent a good bit of time in Taos County. I *always* try to have a meal at Orlando's in Taos when I'm there. I've been wanting to ride my Super Tenere out there, but haven't done it yet. I own a little tract of land with sage (chamiso!) on it where I've done a good bit of car camping near Questa. If you end up going in the first full week of June, maybe I could meet you in Taos County. While it would be fun to join you for the full trip, the NMBDR is probably too much for my Super Tenere and my skills.
Bob, thanks a lot for the suggestions and it would be really cool to meet there. First week of June is a strong possibility - I am trying to pick a week with little to no rain - don't like mud! I have seen fully loaded GSAs on the NMBDR and as long as you avoid the few technical segments you'd be fine... there are bypasses for those sections. Something to think about!
 

misterk

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Joined
Jul 21, 2015
Messages
858
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Colleyville
#19
I looked at your map. Take a look at GPS Kevin's continental divide route from Silver City NM. There are some really nice dirt roads that can be included. For example, there is a great road 6 between Datil and Pie town, then connect to paved to Grants. Your route from Grants to Cuba is great.

I am thinking I could meet you in Grants for day 4-7 then head home from Anonito. (depends on date, I have to attend a family wedding one of those weekends.
 
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Joined
May 18, 2005
Messages
587
Location
Plano, TX
#20
Texxter, have you rode 159 via 52 from Winston over to Mogollon thru the mountains ?
I have only been to NM by bike once and it was a short trip to ABQ to visit a friend. So this will be the first time I explore motorcycle-friendly roads in the state. I have been to NM by car many times, but as you know, when driving you pay attention to things other than road quality! :-) So I am not familiar with 159 from Winston to Mogollon... I am sure it's awesome! I wanted to run this segment of the NMBDR between TorC and Reserve, but I am open to changing that to a paved route if it makes sense. I think the last segment from Cuba to Antoñito is the one I am most interested in.

Texxter, Are you thinking like Saturday to Saturday ?
Right now I am pretty open - depending on who's firmly committed and everyone's availability. We should probably decide sometime in May. I would like to track the weather forecast and pick a "dry week" if at all possible.

I looked at your map. Take a look at GPS Kevin's continental divide route from Silver City NM. There are some really nice dirt roads that can be included. For example, there is a great road 6 between Datil and Pie town, then connect to paved to Grants. Your route from Grants to Cuba is great.

I am thinking I could meet you in Grants for day 4-7 then head home from Antoñito. (depends on date, I have to attend a family wedding one of those weekends.
Thank you! I will continue to refine the routes and post updates. Let's make the route awesome! I am not a hardcore offroad rider (learned to do it very late in life and I am not very good at it) and want this trip to have a balance of great pavement, great twisty roads, scenery, cool little towns, with a bit of unpaved trails in pretty places.

P.S. Do you have a link to GPSKevin's continental divide route?
 
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misterk

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Colleyville
#22
I have only been to NM by bike once and it was a short trip to ABQ to visit a friend. So this will be the first time I explore motorcycle-friendly roads in the state. I have been to NM by car many times, but as you know, when driving you pay attention to things other than road quality! :-) So I am not familiar with 159 from Winston to Mogollon... I am sure it's awesome! I wanted to run this segment of the NMBDR between TorC and Reserve, but I am open to changing that to a paved route if it makes sense. I think the last segment from Cuba to Antoñito is the one I am most interested in.



Right now I am pretty open - depending on who's firmly committed and everyone's availability. We should probably decide sometime in May. I would like to track the weather forecast and pick a "dry week" if at all possible.



Thank you! I will continue to refine the routes and post updates. Let's make the route awesome! I am not a hardcore offroad rider (learned to do it very late in life and I am not very good at it) and want this trip to have a balance of great pavement, great twisty roads, scenery, cool little towns, with a bit of unpaved trails in pretty places.

P.S. Do you have a link to GPSKevin's continental divide route?
find last years continental divide thread Rich (trailboss) put together. I think the gpx files are on that thread.
 
Joined
Feb 1, 2014
Messages
910
Location
Republic of Texas
#25
Hello,
I am starting to plan a week-long trip to NM in late May or early June. I am somewhat flexible with the dates but I probably don't want to go after mid June.
Leaving May 3. Might could put it off till 1st week of June.

If I go alone I'd camp a 2-3 nights in pretty places, but not every night. With company we can discuss what makes sense - camping is not critical and I can skip it altogether.
I'm camping. Good place to camp located in Chloride Canyon.
Then you can make Reserve late afternoon.

Main part i want to ride is :

That section between TOC and Reserve is climbing up to over 9k feet (not alt). It is not bad, just the road going up the mountain is made of baby heads where you bounce at lot... No cliffs to worry about, just trees.

Once your over the top, you have nice gravel/dirt road descending along the ridge. Pretty ride. there is sorta a drop off on you left, so dont get distracted and go off it.

Section 7 - Rio Chama, would not miss this.

Section 4 (taken from another post)
Luna has fuel and has not run out in the two years the owner/manager has been there.
What the manager told me about the BDR group that came by was it was a Sunday and they are closed on Sun. She just happened to come by the station to get gas for herself and saw the riders there. She opened and they fueled and went on their way.

Luna Service Station
M-F 7:00am to 6:00pm
Sat 8:00am to 6:00pm
Sunday closed.
I may cutoff somewhere close to the AZ border and continue up to UT.

Looking on another forum, seems a lot riders are headed out on the NMBDR on <=250 size bikes, late May early June.
 
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misterk

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Jul 21, 2015
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858
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Colleyville
#26
I am free June 2-10.


Here is Rever's description of the NMBDR

TRAVEL INFORMATION

Accommodations

Like the IDBDR, the NMBDR has a scarcity of hotel opportunities along the route. Camping on the other hand is plentiful. Official campgrounds are shown on the front of Butler Maps NMBDR paper map with a small tent icon and many more primitive backcountry camps can be found along the way. Because of the limited beds available in the small towns along the NMBDR, it is recommended that riders make reservations ahead of their arrival. Rooms can be found in Cloudcroft, Ruidoso, Carrizozo, Truth or Consequences, Reserve, Grants, Cuba, Abiquiu`, and Antonito, CO. Additional off-route lodging opportunities available in Socorro and Ojo Caliente.

Navigation Resources

Be Prepared!*Bring the Butler Maps NMBDR paper map along with your REVER routes. You can upload these tracks onto your GPS device or download them to your REVER app to use offline. A full-length documentary of the scouting expedition is available on the Touratech-USA*website*as well as the Butler Maps*site. Since cell phone coverage is limited on much of the route, satellite communication devices are a great idea for unexpected emergencies and it is recommended that routes are downloaded onto REVER’s Offline feature as back-up.

Fuel

Don’t get stuck in the backcountry with an empty tank. The longest distance between fuel stops on the NMBDR is just over 153 miles. Even if your bike can go well beyond this distance, we recommend carrying extra fuel.

When to Go

Many of the higher elevation sections of the NMBDR are not passable in winter months. The ideal time to ride the entire route is June through October.

How to Get There

The beginning of the NMBDR is within a day or two ride for most people in the Western United States. Mileage from the nearest large cities are listed below.

Distance to NMBDR Start (miles)

Albuquerque – 357 miles (5+ hours)

Denver – 681 miles (10 hours)

Dallas – 567 miles (8+ hours)

Los Angeles – 891 miles (13 hours)

Salt Lake City – 952 miles (14+ hours)

Disclaimer: This REVER group is designed to be a planning tool and information resource, but is not intended to be a complete navigation tool. All travelers using any Backcountry Discovery Route should have a complete set of Forest Service, BLM or other detailed maps and current GPS tracks of the route. Travelers should also be competent in map and GPS navigation in remote areas.



SECTION DESCRIPTIONS

Section 1 (including route #’s 1, 2 & 3) ‘Dell City, Texas to Ruidoso, New Mexico’

The southern starting point of Section 1 of the NMBDR riding kicks off in Dell City, TX, a small farming community just across the border. The landscape here may be nothing to write home about, but hang in there, the Land of Enchantment awaits! Make sure to top off your fuel tan before leaving town, it will be a long time before you hit the next service station. Head north out of Dell City and you’ll end up at the foothills of the Guadalupe Rim, which is flanked by the Guadalupe Mountains to the northeast. Savor the warm weather while you can – before you know it you’ll be ascending 5,000 feet onto the rim itself by way of a short segment of incredible tarmac. Absorb the majestic scenery at the top of the Crow Flats Valley you just rode through, as well as the Brokeoff Mountains to the west. Fuel up again in Wed and point your cycle west through the Sacramento Mountains. Lovely primitive campsites dot the way throughout the entire route. Heads up: these roads may be impassable when they’re wet. Soon you’ll spy White Sands National Monument in the distance while traveling on West Side Road. The high country town of Cloudcroft happens to be one of the most iconic towns in all of New Mexico – We recommend spending a few hours here to fully soak in the charm. Mad Jack’s is a great place for quality BBQ and enjoy award-winning apple pie at the legendary Apple Barn prior to embarking on Section 2 of the NMBDR.

Highlights: Riding high along the Guadalupe Rim – Incredible views of White Sands National Monument – Unique town of Cloudcroft – Fantastic two-track

Heads Up

Alert: Very remote until Weed – Open range with cattle

Camping: Guadalupe Rim – Primitive camping west of Weed and north of Cloudcroft – Campgrounds around Cloudcroft

Fuel + Food: Dell City – Weed – Cloudcroft – Ruidoso

Hotel + Motel: Cloudcroft has a few motels – Ruidoso has several – Advised to book ahead in each case

Section 2 (including route # 4 & 5) ‘Ruidoso to Truth or Consequences’

Section 2 begins with a series of rock-based, mountain roads. You’ll twist and turn through high-elevation deciduous forest and across numerous slow-moving streams enroute to Ruidoso, an engaging mountain hamlet. The route continues north of town on its timbered trek before dropping into the Tularosa Valley and onward to the Town of Carrizozo. If you’ve been experiencing bike issues, the ‘Carrizozo Bike Shop’ has an extensive knowledge of European and other metric-spec bikes. Not long after a short jaunt on US Highway 380, the pavement changes to dirt and begins to turn north by way of a spectacular double-track. Take it ALL in, this is New Mexico at it’s nest! Please note: there are private ranches in the area – a safe and respectful speed is imperative to avoid losing the privilege of riding such a remarkable section. Regain the highway about 35 miles down the road and head west and then south toward the White Sands Missile Range. This lengthy, quite sandy passage is appropriately named ‘Jornada del Muerto’ (Route of the Deadman) as there are no amenities for the next 105 miles!

Highlights: Ruidoso is a cool resort town – Bonito Lake – Nogal Canyon Road – Main Street burro art in Carrizozo – Valley of Fires Recreation Area

Heads Up

Alert: Very few services – Working ranch north of Carrizozo, watch for cattle – CR A153 and A250 are sandy and can be deep at times

Camping: Bonito Lake – Primitive camping along NF 108, CR 176 – Campgrounds outside of Ruidoso and Carrizozo

Fuel + Food: Ruidoso – Carrizozo – Truth or Consequences

Hotel + Motel: Ruidoso has several – Carrizozo has one but not always open – Truth or Consequences has many small boutique motels with hot springs

Section 3 (including route #’s 6 & 7) ‘Truth or Consequences to Reserve’

Launch this section in Truth or Consequences, a town that got its moniker from a popular 1950’s game show. Don’t miss out on the many thermal pools that T or C offers – it’s the best way to soak away the aches and pains from a long day in the saddle! The route moves north along the banks of Elephant Butte Lake, which boasts some of the most spectacular camping along the entire NMBDR. After bisecting I-25, the road climbs up and into the Sierra Cuchillo foothills of the Black Range and on toward Winston. Stock up on fuel and supplies at the General Store and get ready for Chloride Canyon, a protracted technical section (you’ll cross Chloride Creek over 100 times in this section), before riding up and over the divide to Reserve. This is arguably the most remote part of the NMBDR: if you aren’t a confident and skilled rider, we recommend skirting this section and hitting the pavement for 30 miles instead of riding the dirt. The following 100 miles escort riders through high-elevation woodland, breathtaking scenery, and fast rhythmic double-track. Pristine freshwater lakes accent the entire journey – pick a pool and take a quick, invigorating dip to clear your head for the rest of the trip.

Highlights: Hot Springs in T or C – Camping on Elephant Butte Lake – Winston General Store – Chloride Canyon – Gila National Forest – Snow Lake

Heads Up

Alert: Only regular fuel in Winston – Chloride Canyon is prone to flash floods – Chloride Canyon is an ‘Intermediate Plus’ route. An alternative easier route is available – Routes can be impassable if wet west of Winston

Camping: Dispersed/Organized at Elephant Butte Lake – Many camping opportunities in Gila National Forest west of Winston

Fuel + Food: Truth or Consequences – Elephant Butte – Reserve

Hotel + Motel: T or C has many small boutique motels with hot springs as well as larger chain options for lodging – Winston General Store has one cabin – Reserve has on 8-room motel with hot springs

Section 4 (including route #’s 8 & 9) ‘Reserve to Fence Lake’

As is common along the NMBDR gas stations are sparse, so don’t forget to top off while in Reserve – the small service station in Luna is often closed. This route parallels Arizona, all it takes is a quick ride 500 feet down a fork to hit the state line. You’ll pass scads of Piñon and Juniper and catch glimpses of ancient cliff dwellings high along the cliffs. By and by, the track drops down into a high desert and then heads due north to US Highway 60 and the Zuni Reservation. An overlook near the Zuni Salt Lake showcases just how desolate and otherworldly this area truly is. There’s a wild and terrible beauty in western New Mexico unlike any other state in the Union.

Highlights: High elevation road out of Reserve – Ride into Arizona on this trip – Fun flowing forest roads – Wild horses – Zuni Salt Lake Overlook

Heads Up

Alert: Road west out of Reserve can be impassable when wet – Fuel store in Luna isn’t always open – Travel slow through ranch north of Highway 60 – No services in Fence Lake

Camping: Dispersed/organized in the Gila National Forest – Some camping on BLM north of Highway 60 – Nice private campground north of Reserve with showers and laundry

Fuel + Food: Fuel and a great little grocery store in Reserve – Luna (not always open)

Hotel + Motel: Reserve has one 8-room motel – Reservations are suggested

Section 5 (including route #10) ‘Fence Lake to Grants’

Viable camping spots are scarce along this leg of the NMBDR – any camping here must be viewed as a privilege and access is granted solely by the residents of the reservation. However, easily accessible camping is found just south of Grants inside the Cibola National Forest farther down the road. Wide open spaces and picturesque vistas ultimately give way to hilly canyon terrain by the time the small depot known as Candy Kitchen comes into view. Consider a visit to the Wild Spirit Wolf Sanctuary, across the street from the General Store, and where roughly 90 wolves are housed at any given time. It’s a fascinating learning experience and a donation will be much appreciated. Low on fuel? Hop off the road for a short 6-mile side-trip to the tiny community of Pinehill, where the only services are located until the town of Grants.

Highlights: Candy Kitchen and Wild Wolf Sanctuary – El Morro National Monument (off route) – Bandera Ice Caves (off route) – Zuni Canyon Road

Heads Up

Alert: No services in Fence Lake – Travel onto Ramah Indian Reservation – Roads can see more traffic

Camping: Dispersed in the Cibola National Forest – Campground at El Morro National Monument (off route)

Fuel + Food: Candy Kitchen – Pinehill – Grants

Hotel + Motel: Wolf Sanctuary has limited number of rooms – Grants

Section 6 (including route #11) ‘Grants to Cuba’

Plan ahead for this 121 mile ride, an extremely remote and challenging journey: top sand-riding skills are a must, as the sand is plentiful and occasionally deep. The road snakes along the foothills of the San Mateo Mountains, offering endless views of sandstone towers and monoliths carved by wind and water since time immemorial. Primitive camping abounds, so you’ll be able to enjoy your time even more on this stretch of the Wild West that points north.

Highlights: Mount Taylor – Ranchland travel – Iconic New Mexico Desert

Heads Up

Alert: No services at all in this section – Very remote – Sand can be deep – Roads can be washed out – Roads can be impassable when wet – Open range cattle – LEAVE GATES AS YOU FOUND THEM

Camping: Dispersed in the Cibola National Forest – Dispersed camping on BLM land – NO CAMPING in private ranchland

Fuel + Food: Grants – Cuba – Torreon (off route)

Hotel + Motel: Grants has many chain and independent motels – Cuba has a couple but check reviews – Nice B&B just south of Cuba in Section 7

Section 7 (including route # 12, 13 & 14) ‘Cuba to Antonito, Colorado’

“We’ve saved the best for last!” The final leg of the NMBDR is perfection, rocky mountain style. Be sure to stop in Abiquiu to fuel up and to view one of New Mexico’s oldest churches before concluding the ride, which has two options. Up for one last challenge? Head west and then north outside of Abiquiu to arrive to El Rito via a scenic byway distinctive for a prominent ridge above Canon del Cobre in the Carson National Forest. (The route is less difficult if ridden north to south, as the rocky ledges are more easily descended rather than climbed.) Or, jump on highway 554, the paved main road that leads to El Rito. The closing 100 miles of the NMBDR are highlighted by an array of flowy forest roads that dance in and out of verdant meadows and deciduous canopies, a dazzling ushering in of Colorado as the miles roll past. Please be cautious while cruising these high elevation roads, you’ll encounter all kinds of outdoor enthusiasts enjoying the area. Once over the Colorado state line, the road eases down, down into the Conejos River Valley and on to the end point, Antonito.

Highlights: Higher elevation roads – Abiquiu` Reservoir – Historic town of Abiquiu` – Old Spanish missions – Santa Fe and Carson National Forest – Los Pinos River – Ojo Caliente Hot Springs (off route)

Heads Up

Alert: Look for oncoming traffic – No services from Abiquiu` to Antonito – Late afternoon thunderstorms

Camping: Dispersed in the Santa Fe and Carson National Forest – Campgrounds at Abiquiu` Reservoir and in both national forests – Private campgrounds in Mogote, CO

Fuel + Food: Cuba – Abiquiu` – Ojo Caliente (off route) – Antonito, CO

Hotel + Motel: Nice B&B just south of Cuba – Abiquiu` Inn (very nice and the only inn in town) – Ojo Caliente (off route) – Lodges near Antonito
 

misterk

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Joined
Jul 21, 2015
Messages
858
Location
Colleyville
#27
I hate deep sand and will do my best to avoid on a big bike......

Pic 1 is the NM BDR

Pic 2 is deep yucky desert sand - which I would choose to bypass.

I have done the sections west and north of Truth and Consquences, very nice.
e92880a0818c9ab7fec9e7b77e85f557.jpg
4ab3362dbe40744aac1036d7ba790f5a.jpg
 
Joined
May 18, 2005
Messages
587
Location
Plano, TX
#33
3 of us are heading out there May 27th for the week.
On June 2 we will pretty much done with the dual sport phase of the trip and heading south from Antonito to Santa Fe and eventually Las Cruces on paved roads. We want to be home by Sunday 6/3. Should be fun! We are not doing the entire NMBDR, only a couple of segments, the one from Winston through Chloride and the last day from Cuba to Antonito. We'll be doing on-pavement riding a good chunk of the time.
 
Joined
Mar 26, 2017
Messages
72
Location
Dallas
#34
On June 2 we will pretty much done with the dual sport phase of the trip and heading south from Antonito to Santa Fe and eventually Las Cruces on paved roads. We want to be home by Sunday 6/3. Should be fun! We are not doing the entire NMBDR, only a couple of segments, the one from Winston through Chloride and the last day from Cuba to Antonito. We'll be doing on-pavement riding a good chunk of the time.
I regret that I'm tied up then. But I'll hope that you'll please post lots of info and pics about your ride. Ride safe.

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misterk

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Jul 21, 2015
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858
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Colleyville
#35
On June 2 we will pretty much done with the dual sport phase of the trip and heading south from Antonito to Santa Fe and eventually Las Cruces on paved roads. We want to be home by Sunday 6/3. Should be fun! We are not doing the entire NMBDR, only a couple of segments, the one from Winston through Chloride and the last day from Cuba to Antonito. We'll be doing on-pavement riding a good chunk of the time.


Well, I missed the dates, so you guys have fun. I am going to head out on June 2.


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Joined
Sep 2, 2016
Messages
204
Location
San Juans
#42
Texxter- don't know if you left yet, but I just got back from a 3125mi trip, doing a few sections of the nmbdr before heading into AZ, then up to CO. I cut over into AZ after Reserve, near Luna and Alpine. If you have any questions about conditions or anything let me know.
 
Joined
May 18, 2005
Messages
587
Location
Plano, TX
#43
Chris, thank you so much for the offer! We were in New Mexico when you posted above. David, Daniel and I did five days in New Mexico, with a combination of paved and unpaved surfaces, with more paved miles than unpaved. We had a very ambitious plan to cover lots of ground and had to modify it as we went, mostly to reduce it to manageable days. We really enjoyed the Gila Wilderness, Lincoln Forest and the areas in Sandoval County, including the Gilman Tunnels. Didn't get to do the last day of the NMBDR, as I had planned, but I will do it in the future. We had no flats or issues with the bikes (2 wr250r and 1 Weestrom) other than a front caliper misaligned, which we fixed in Pie Town. Dropped the bikes a couple of times due to rocky climbs, but it wasn't bad. We learned that New Mexico is dry dry this year... the Chloride Canyon had no water crossings because the creek was bone dry. We saw from the distance smoke from forest fires in the Apache Creek area. Did 60% motels and 40% camping. Overall a great trip, scaled back from the plan, but still very enjoyable. I put together a quick and dirty video composite, which is a bit too long, 19 minutes, sorry!

[ame="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8g704czbWyM"]New Mexico 2018 - YouTube[/ame]
 
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Texasrider58

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Feb 1, 2016
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Mineral Wells
#46
Paco, Daniel and I had a very good trip. The scenery was pretty awesome to get to see some of that country. For the first day we rode to The Gila Cliff Dwellings and then back down 15 and took 35 east over to Forest Road 150. Forest Road 150 or north star road has some amazing scenery. The road finally meets up with New Mexico 59 at the Beaverhead work station and then we went I believe it was East over to 52 to Winston New Mexico. This would be the first days ride.
The second day we started our ride with going thru Chloride Canyon. The canyon was fun and is challenging. But had the Strom kind of loaded down and I done pretty well up to the point that I had to make that right turn up that hill. After the second tip over we had to just unload the bike so we could work the bike back down the hill. We had lunch at the Winston General store and then we started back West on 52 and 59 and then started back through the forest lands and flatlands toward Reserve New Mexico. We saw some mule deer , elk and smoke from the big forest fire. Very interesting ride that second day. We hit a pretty long stretch of a heavily graveled road that I wasn't too fond of. Riding the Strom on that Gravel Road didn't do my elbow and arm any favors from the tip over in Chloride. My 3rd day involved leaving Reserve and going down through Deming over to Las Cruces to have my truck checked out. The next day I was in Capitan and spent that evening riding around Ruidosa.
Friday, I spent the day riding in the Cloudcroft area. The trip made for a fun week.
 
Joined
Jun 27, 2017
Messages
57
Location
San Angelo
#48
We did the BDR on June1 it was a good time. The scenery was nice but it was extremely dry. The pine trees showed the drought stress they were grayish green all the grass was dead or dormant. Every lake that was supposed to there was bone dry. Chloride canyon was completely dry except about a 75' section where a small spring had created small puddles in the ruts of the road. Every animal in the canyon was trying to drink from the few puddles. The deer were so thirsty that they didn't move until we were about 10 feet from them.

The day 1 from Dell City to Ruidoso is a long day. I found the route to be fairly rough and slow going. A lot of washboard roads, and some powdered dirt pits that is like powdered sugar. It was 12' deep in several areas. The ride across the Guadalupe ridge was rocky or gravel marbles for its entire length, We were on big bikes so it was slow going about 15-20 miles per hour. While there were some epic views, it was my least favorite day of the entire route.

The entire ride with the exception of very northern NM into Colorado where the forest finally greened up and trees look bright green and healthy and some green grass in the meadows. The rest was a of the ride about 900 miles of heavy dust conditions. I coughed up brown for a week after we finished the ride. We bypassed the heavy sand section to truth or consequences. The temps were close to 98 degrees and two inexperienced riders in the group we just were not up to a 6 hour sand butt kickin.
Be sure to check forest closure on a daily basis because we had to bypass some of the route due to forest closures.

We are going to the best of COBDR on Aug 25 with GPS Kevin ride adventures we are hoping for a little more moisture on this event.
 
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