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Free lens?

Joined
Oct 16, 2008
Messages
1,921
Location
Bryan, TX
A friend called me and said he had inherited a Canon lens and bag and he would give it to me if I wanted it. Yes, I did want it. It turned out to be a Canon 40D with 10-135, 28-135 and 70-300 lens, camera bag and assorted other goodies. The original receipt was in the bag. $2906 included $200 for a SD1100 camera and an extended warranty on the cameras and lens. Warranties have run out and the smaller camera was not in the bag and neither was the battery charger. It uses a compact flash memory card. If the card on the receipt was their only memory card, their last picture was taken in 2010.Does someone offer an adapter to allow the use of SD or micro SD cards? I have quite a few of those.

Years ago, I gave a different friend a Yamaha DT250 that had been sitting several years. He still hasn't forgiven me for giving him the "free" bike. Am I going to eventually feel the same way about this camera.
 

Tourmeister

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As long as it actually works, I don't think you'll be unhappy with it. It is what is known as a crop body as opposed to a full frame. So the lenses designed for it will not be real expensive. However, it can probably work with the more expensive lenses. To know if you have the expensive lenses, look for the max aperture setting on the lenses. If any of them are bigger than f/3.5, like say f/2.8, then they are the cheaper lenses. Cheaper lenses also won't be as large in diameter out at the end of the lens. If they have around a 72mm opening, then they are likely the better lens, because they let in more light. If they are around 52-55mm, then they will be the cheaper lenses. Either way, you should still be able to take some nice shots with them.
 
Joined
Mar 21, 2004
Messages
776
Location
College Station, TX
The 40D is going to be just fine. It's a "pro-sumer" camera body. 1.6 crop frame sensor, but it's the nice canon CMOS sensor so it will look great. Plus they are quite rugged. We still have a 30D and my old 10D and we use them in sketchy places where we don't want to put the 5D's. Last summer we went to Barton Springs and put our 30D in an underwater housing. The cold water caused lots of condensation in the camera until it stopped working. We dried it out and it still works fine! lol

I'm not familiar with a 10-135 lens. There's a 10-18 and a 10-22 lens. There's also an 18-135. If you have the 10-22, that's an awesome super-wide angle lens.

Just buy yourself a couple of cheap CF cards. They'll be about the same price as buying an adaptor.
 
Joined
Oct 16, 2008
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Location
Bryan, TX
I was wrong about the 10-135. it's actually 10-22 with a 77mm lens 1:3.5-4.5. I typed it wrong because I tried to remember all three lens sizes without looking a second time. The 28-135mm has a 72mm lens, 1:3.5-5.6 IS. The 70-300mm has a 58mm lens 1:4-5.6. They originally paid $649.99 for the 70-300. The receipt is faded and I can't find the other lens. Maybe they came with the camera. Charger came in today and I'm charging a battery as I type. I'll see if it works tomorrow. If not, all 3 lens fit my original Canon and I've never had anything lower than 28 or higher than 200. I also had to order a manual for the camera. All the manuals for the lens are in the bag, but no camera book.
 

Tourmeister

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you can find manuals for most lenses and cameras online in PDF form, usually from the manufacturer's site. Nikon even has an app that lets you load manuals for all your various Nikon goodies so you have them on your phone.

It sounds like all those lenses are crop body lenses, meant to work with your body. So the 300mm is actually 300mm zoom. If the 70-300 were for a full frame body and you used it on a crop body, you would get an effective zoom of around 450mm.

For most stuff, they will do great. Low light conditions is where you will notice issue only because you will have to use slower shutter speeds or higher ISO settings once you have the aperture as wide open as it will go and you are still underexposed. So you might have to use a flash slightly more often than you would with a lens that will open all the way up to f/2.8.
 
Joined
Sep 4, 2009
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Arlington
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Tim
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Shelfer
Amazon sells all sorts of compact flash cards. Looks like the going rate is around a dollar a GB. A little expensive as compared to SD cards at closer to a quarter a GB. But heck, pony up for a 64GB card, and you've just enabled a boat load of Canon gear for around $50 and some change. And whatever the slot on the Canon looks like, I can't imagine it'll accommodate a card + adapter, unless you want some weird thingie hanging out of your camera, which I can easily envision as being a recipe for no end of technical issues.
 
Joined
Oct 16, 2008
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Location
Bryan, TX
Tim, I was hoping there was some kind of adapter similar to the microSD to SD. I have a lot of SD and Micro SD from my Go Pro. I have started using my storage device from the camera as my permanent storage. I have a note book with small pouches for SD and SG types and that keeps them organized. I took the advice of HiSPL and ordered 6 of the CF cards with 4GB each.
 
Joined
Sep 4, 2009
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Tim
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Shelfer
Gotcha. Like a CF-sized adapter card that would hold an SD or micro-SD. On second look at Amazon, they're actually out there. Here's an example of one, for only $15. And based on the usage chart, it appears it'll work with your specific camera. At that price, it's worth a try. Good luck with it, and congrats on the camera.

 

LDB

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May 9, 2006
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Friendswood
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Leo
The xxD line is Canon's mid-level line of cameras. The 40 is a dozen or so years old. It has been superseded by the 50, 60, 70 and now they are on the 80 with speculation a 90D will appear within a year or so. There have been MAJOR changes and upgrades from then to now. Canon is currently selling the 80D with 18-55 and 55-250 lenses through their refurbished division for $699, an absolute steal.

I'm newly returned to photography so I'm only somewhat up on current equipment and not on 2007 equipment. Unless there have been lenses discontinued in the interim your 10-22 is an EF-S lens meaning it's designed for DX camera bodies. Those are the ones with the smaller sensor as used in your 40D and my 80D. On our cameras they give a full image in the photo. If used on an FX camera, FX being full frame sensor, they will not give a full frame image as their circle of light transmitted is smaller than the size of the sensor. Imagine looking through a paper towel tube at a photo on the wall. You see a clear circle in the middle but the corners are gone. Or imagine laying a dime on top of a postage stamp. The part covered by the penny is the part this lens transmits to the sensor. The remainder that you can see around the penny gets no image so it's blank.

There has never been a 28-135 DX lens that I'm aware of. All lenses are compared to 35mm film format since that was the standard for so long. With DX cameras there is a crop factor that has to be taken into account. For most DX cameras it is 1.5 except for Canon which is 1.6. So John/Jane takes a 35mm camera with 28-135 lens and it's just a straight up 28-135 setup. Mike/Mary takes an anything but Canon DX camera with 28-135 and with the 1.5 factor it's equivalent to a 42-202 lens roughly. Finally Ed/Erin takes a Canon DX with 28-135 and it's equivalent to a 45-216 lens. It boils down to how wide or narrow the angle of view is which determines the image reaching the sensor. On a Canon the 70-300 is equivalent to 112-480 roughly.

The 28-135 and 70-300 lenses you have are FX or full frame lenses almost assuredly. That means they are meant to project an image onto a large sensor. Back to our postage stamp, imagine laying a silver dollar over the stamp. It's completely covered and there is extra coin all around it. That's what happens with these lenses. It doesn't matter to you or the camera. When you look through the viewfinder you see just what the sensor will see. The rest is just extra that can't be used. Those two lenses could graduate with you to any Canon camera including FX ones. The 10-22 can also but every picture will be circular with no corners like the dime on the stamp.

Now add a dollar to what I've shared and it might be worth a cup of coffee. Oh, you might want to look into the Brazos Valley Photo Club. You could probably learn a lot and find some good folks to work with, perhaps even some who are also riders. https://bvphoto.club/
 
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