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Hail Yes - MexTrek 2010

Tourmeister

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Hmmm... it's a tad bouncy and makes me feel kind of queasy... :uhoh: I think maybe having it on your head makes it less bouncy and easier to watch :shrug: Sure looks like some awesome riding though :drool:
 
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What happened? Did you guys pop over the log or what? I'm hoping you got video of the guys trying to get over it. :trust:

Milton, thanks for the new avatar. :dude:
 
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Day 2 (Friday) started off with another nice morning watching the town of Galeana wake up. I like the way the town comes together to clean up the square.

Walking to breakfast


Hugo translating breakfast orders


Our plans for riding that day were to run the Gold Standard route in reverse. Leaving Galeana heading towards Rayones it was looking like a much dryier day the what we had the previous day. I was riding sweep and had to stay pretty far back to avoid the dust cloud.



All those years of welding has taken effect on Izz's eyes and he sometimes has to get really close to the road signs to read them.


Jarrett wondering where the high speed, slippery rock down hill roads were at


Jimmy handling his KTM


Hugo and Izz getting ready to roll


We made it to Rayones and stopped for gas when Izz noticed the rack for his bike's side cases had broke. We sat and contemplated our options as Milton’s group headed out. Izz was going to break off from the group and spend the day finding a welder so he could have his bike back for the next day’s ride. Someone suggested trying to find a welder there in Rayones to see if he could get it done while we wait. About that time a few riders from Milton’s group showed back up and said Milton had a break line issue and was at a shop about a mile down the road so we went there hoping they'd have a welder. Come to find out they had a welding machine but didn't know how to use it. Good thing Izz was a huge MacGyver fan growing up as he's seems to be able to fix just about anything.

Here are a few random videos and picts of the event. Note that we were in Rayones and not Reynosa as the often so wrong narrator states.







Doing what it takes to make large shim fit in a small hole


Izz turns his head for protection as the electrical technician connects power for the welding machine


Hey, it worked.....


Spot welding to set the angles prior to removing for the permanent weld all the while monitoring the "thermal detonator" for accidental activation




Izz needed some metal to brace up his rack so started looking for a women’s undergarment store... oh wait, wrong story! He did rummage through a scrap pile at the shop and after not finding what he needed the shop attendant suggest he use some of the rebar on top of the building. Izz rummages around and found the perfect piece.







That distributer actually did get installed on the bike. Well, maybe for just a short time by one of the merry pranksters.



Final touches on the brake splice


Now it's time to put some fluid in this system and test it out. A few of the riders were able to find brake fluid at a local store. Milton did have an issue with loosening one of the reservoir cap screws but nothing he couldn't fix with a hammer. A quick bleed of the system and he was ready to ride.


With the rack removed Izz made a quick job at the final weld and was ready to roll.


One of these was the merry prankster, I won't spill the beans as to which one...


Back on the trail again the now smaller group rode for awhile and finally started climbing in elevation where it cooled off and showed some pretty serious signs of rain up ahead.





We took a quick break in Casillas


While listening to the rumble of a not so distant thunderstorm a few of us decided to stay behind to put on our rain gear while Miltons group pressed on. Riding at a bit faster pace we figured it wouldn't be a problem catching up. The problem arose when we accidently blew by the turn off to Laguna de Sanchez and Mesa del Oso which permanently separated us from Miltons group for the rest of the day. We ran into Pink Loyd and his group who rode with us for a bit but decided to turn back to take another route.

An interesting side story, while we were cruzing down the trail we ran across a local walking two horses (one a young colt) holding them each by the bridle rope. The first bike past spooked the colt and he managed to get free from his owner and ran in front of the bikes for nearly a mile down the road in the opposite direction his owner wanted to go. Jarrett and Hugo managed to pass the colt and then Izz was able to get him to stop by cutting off his path. Having seen the frustration in the owners eyes I decided to run the colt back to his owner. That poor colt was so tired by that time but he made it back and the owner gave me a nice wave in appreciation. It was cool that we got to do a little wrangling while down there!

We ended up riding in some pretty heavy rain for several miles going through some pretty decent elevation changes. Jarrett had forgot the lower part of his rain gear so was getting pretty soaked and cold. We made it through the rain by the time we'd reached the most northern part of our route. We were going to head east and circle our way back to Galeana but that's where the rain was headed so we decided to head west and circle back on a nice valley road we'd ridden in the past. We stop to gas up in San Jose and then head for our valley road that we'd enjoyed so much last year. Problem was that when we got there we discovered that the previous rain had soaked the low lying area and it was a mud pit. Riding in mud can be fun but this would have been about 45 miles of it and nobody was up for that as the sun was on its way down. Without doubling back and completing our original route our next option was Hwy 57 but the problem was there was a mountain range in-between us and the highway. We could have doubled back ~30 miles on the trail/street but nobody wanted that option either. Our GPS's listed a trail across but a local we asked said it wasn't there. Jarrett actually checked it out but it was more of a horse trail and we didn't want to try that in the dark. The local did tell us of another option so we set off to find it, a few failed attempts later it was found and we were on a really cool trail that took us through the towns of El Castillo and Puerto Grande over to the highway. Once on the highway we rode 30 miles south eastish and were coming up on yet another rain cloud so made a really good decision to take the mountain pass from El Potosi over to La Lagunita. We've ridden it the previous year and it's a really nice trail that takes you up to ~8400ft at a rapid accent.

Reflective sleeves rock


But not as cool as reflective pants


After reaching the top we rode across this nice platue with some farming action taking place and then a winding road down to La Lagunita where we found a late night baseball game taking place. I should have stopped to take pictures but as daylight was nearly gone we were in a hurry, maybe a bit too much of a hurry. We hit a fairly straight patch of trail and I could see Izz was getting on the gas so decided to do the same. Just as I was next to him he got stuck in a rut and headed off the trail.





First thing we did was make sure Izz was ok. He was doing fine and like the rest of us was recounting his final thoughts just before he hit. Then the thoughts turned to getting the bike out and Izz jumped to the other side of the gully and wham, his knee gave out.


We ended up being able to back his bike out pretty easily and aside from a cracked fairing and a little mud the bike was in good shape. Izz crawled back on the bike and we rode another ~10 miles of trail before reaching pavement and then another ~10 miles in the dark until we reached Galeana at 9pm. It was a full day of riding and other than Izz's knee we all had a really good time. Finished off the evening with a nice dinner and storytelling.
 
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I still think this is so classic that Izzy cut off a part of that guys building to weld into his bracket for support.

Did you declare that at the border as something you were taking out of Mexico? :lol2:

 
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Day 3

Day 3

I had been mulling my options over and decided the first thing I would do is attempt to repair the clutch. If I wasn’t able to get the clutch working then I would likely have to have the bike towed to McAllen. I was not prepared to continue riding the bike without a clutch.

I got my tools out and went to work. Luckily, the problem with the clutch quickly revealed itself. Whatever had been binding the cable had come unbound and all I had to do was readjust the barrel adjuster and take the slack out of the cable. Once that was done the clutch worked fine. Doh! If only I had figured this out yesterday afternoon while up on the mountain I could have avoid the issue of trying to get out of the boonies without a clutch. Still, I’m glad it was an easy fix and my MexTrek could continue.

We were headed further south today. Our plan was to ride Hwy 101 southwest from Ciudad Victoria down to Juamave and then explore a dirt road / trail south from there. This dirt road skirted the west side of the Reserva de la Biostera el Cielo.
890611885_59zhP-L.jpg


Hwy 101 is the old paved road from Victoria to Tula and points west. I had heard it was a good twisty mountain road and was looking forward to riding it personally. It turned out to be an excellent road with almost no traffic.

Here’s the straight part of Hwy 101 looking east towards Ciudad Victoria. It gets twisty after this. :-P
886246066_hEGTv-L.jpg


Hwy 101 has miles of twisties, abundant elevation changes, great views, near perfect pavement, and no traffic. What more could you want? Milton was having a great time.
886247054_T2zNx-L.jpg






886247436_5Tzc7-L.jpg


I can fully recommend Hwy 101 to you if you are ever in the area.
 
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Day 3 continued

After a gas stop in Juamave, we pointed our bikes south for a little dirt exploration. The first part of this road was straight and scenic. The surface was maintained gravel so it was easy riding. The views of the distant mountains were nice.

Milton headed for the distant mountains


A few miles south, where the map indicates the road turns into a trail, things got a lot more interesting. The road was still a road, but it was a dirt road, not gravel or rock. It also entered the mountains and became quite twisty with numerous elevation changes.

The dirt road south from Juamave is a fun, twisty, and scenic class 1 road


Up in the mountains, we passed a hombre plowing a field with a horse drawn plow. That’s got to be gut-busting hard work. I stopped and chatted with him for a few minutes about the road conditions ahead. He let me take a picture before I departed.

Plowing with a horse-drawn plow


At one particularly scenic spot Milton stopped for a photograph. While he was doing his thing with his camera his DRZ decided to take a nap. I was stopped up ahead and saw the bike down so I went back to help him out. I didn’t take a pic of the bike but I do have some evidence – the lever end busted off when the bike fell and I got a pic of that.

Incriminating evidence


More great riding and views






The main purpose of our extended MexTrek was to recon south and find new dual sport roads worth riding. This road meets that criteria with room to spare.
 

izz

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This picture is too intriguing not to hear the back story...
Well, after you land in a ditch in Mexico and then see the orthopedist when you get back to civilization and they tell you about a level 2 MCL tear/sprain plus a 6 week knee brace...here's what happens:

KneeBrace.jpg


OR

Mad-Max.jpg
 
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Well, after you land in a ditch in Mexico and then see the orthopedist when you get back to civilization and they tell you about a level 2 MCL tear/sprain plus a 6 week knee brace...here's what happens:

KneeBrace.jpg


OR

Mad-Max.jpg
hahaha awesome, even down to the wrench (Mel and I call 'em "shifters" )
 

Tourmeister

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Well, after you land in a ditch in Mexico and then see the orthopedist when you get back to civilization and they tell you about a level 2 MCL tear/sprain plus a 6 week knee brace...here's what happens:

KneeBrace.jpg
Looks like your dog could use a brace on that back left leg :cool2:
 
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Man that video is hilarious, I'm so glad you had the camera rolling. That fall is when I stabbed my finger with that darn agave looking plant that had 2 inch thorns sticking out if it!
 
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Man that video is hilarious, I'm so glad you had the camera rolling. That fall is when I stabbed my finger with that darn agave looking plant that had 2 inch thorns sticking out if it!
What's hilarious is that 2 of you fell down but nobody was riding, just walking around. :lol2: :lol2: :lol2:
 
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Re: Day 3 continued

The main purpose of our extended MexTrek was to recon south and find new dual sport roads worth riding. This road meets that criteria with room to spare.
Milton or Richard, would you mind emailing me the .gpx file of that route? I would definitely appreciate it!
 
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Re: Day 3 continued

Milton or Richard, would you mind emailing me the .gpx file of that route? I would definitely appreciate it!
I'm not sure I saved the tracks as a file, but I'll get the route posted up either way for any and all to download.
 

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On the zumo you will have them in the gpx archive folder. The 10,000 points per file and the last 20 files. so basically Richard, you should have your last 200,000 track points. I suspect that will cover all of Mextrek. You just need to go through those and pull the tracks out by day and probably join some segments together.
 
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I've got to go on the next one of these....too long away from Mexico.

Richard, what headlight are you running?
 
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Ronnie, got the DVD today. Looks great!! If I wasn't having Mexico withdrawals before, I'm really needing a Mexico fix now!! :lol2: :lol2: :lol2:

Thanks so much for sending that out!! :thumb:
 
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Day 3 continued

Since this was uncharted territory for us we often stopped and asked directions when we encountered folks. Even kids could provide some guidance.
886252048_r9h7N-L.jpg


At the end of the dirt we went east then south to Los Flores and on to El Naranjo. Though this road is marked as dirt on the map, it is now paved. It was an okay road, with a few twists and turns and some interesting mountains off in the distance.
890613054_iTcN9-L.jpg


We needed a break so we stopped at a little store near Los Flores and made a fun discovery. This little fellow (whatever he was) was friendly and liked to play. Milton played with him for about 10 minutes and even feed him a Topo Chico mineral water.
886252584_eSEGu-L.jpg


On the other hand, this fellow was in charge of store security and growled at me when I got too close to him. I retreated and let him be.
886253646_PoiRE-L.jpg


It was fairly late in the afternoon and the vaqueros were in for the day. They had their saddles hung in the saddle tree, ready for the next day.
886254154_yMbJR-L.jpg


Once the break was over we rode south to El Naranjo (The Orange) and then west to Ciudad Del Maiz (Corn City) for the night. We didn't make it before dark though. Milton knew a nice hotel in Maiz where we could hole up for the night. After a good dinner it was off to bed.

This was as far south as we rode. Tomorrow we were headed back north, with more new roads to explore.
 
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Re: Day 3 continued

Once the break was over we rode south to El Naranjo (The Orange) and then west to Ciudad Del Maiz (Corn City) for the night. We didn't make it before dark though. Milton knew a nice hotel in Maiz where we could hole up for the night. After a good dinner it was off to bed.

This was as far south as we rode. Tomorrow we were headed back north, with more new roads to explore.
Actually we went to Tomasopo where I had a line on a hotel, arriving after dark we couldn't be too picky.
Rich wanted to stay in Cd de Maiz but I thought Tamasopo would be more interesting.
 
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Re: Day 3 continued

Actually we went to Tomasopo where I had a line on a hotel, arriving after dark we couldn't be too picky.
Doh! You would think I know where we stayed, but that isn't actually the case. :mrgreen: Oh well, at least I remember the dirt roads we traveled.
 
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Re: Day 3 continued

Actually we went to Tomasopo where I had a line on a hotel, arriving after dark we couldn't be too picky.
Rich wanted to stay in Cd de Maiz but I thought Tamasopo would be more interesting.
Hola Milton & Richard,
I checked my GPS and I have the tracks from the Cerro El Viejo mini-expedition that Milton and I did on Saturday. If someone can walk me through the process of uploading them I'll post them. Otherwise the next time I'm in Austin I'll just bring the GPS and you guys can transfer them.
Can't wait till the next trip...
Jimmy
 
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Re: Day 3 continued

That there, Milton, is a Coatimundi (Coati for short). Thats the reddest one I have ever seen (well, you saw it) but the ones I've encountered have been dark brown/black with only a bit of red.

I'll share my Coati stories with you in person the next time we meet in Mexico.
 
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Day 4

Day 4 dawned with just a hint of rain in the air. Every afternoon the rain would show up and get us a little wet, but this morning the rain appeared to be making an early appearance. The clouds were heavy and low and I thought for sure we would get really wet today. It sprinkled a little on us as we walked the streets in search of breakfast.

Milton picked this juice joint for breakfast
886788387_C32uE-L.jpg


Breakfast Torta of jamon y queso (i.e. ham and cheese sandwich)
886789174_nNB4Y-L.jpg


We left Tamasopo and headed west and then north on twisty paved roads to Cuidad del Maiz (Corn City - see, I knew we went there at some point). Tamasopo is at altitude and we were riding in the clouds. A few miles later we dropped down, out of the clouds and fog, and into the sun.

From Maiz our goal was uncharted territory once again. We wanted to explore the dirt road leading to La Providencia.

The dirt road east of Ciudad del Maiz to La Providencia was our first goal for the day.
890613054_iTcN9-L.jpg


The Mexican version of a drive up window. This vaquero rode up, ordered a coke, and then rode off. Never even dismounted.
886789614_pVukA-L.jpg


Navigation was easy all the way to La Memela, but finding the trail from there to La Providencia proved to be a bit of a challenge. We wandered around for quite a while, asked a number of people, including a couple of vaqueros, and finally found the right road.

Which way do we go? Looking for the trail to La Providencia was quite the adventure. We eventually figured out that the trail to the left was the right way to go.
886791347_eg6vb-L.jpg


Hey, Amigos, is this the road to La Providencia? Si, Senor, esta diez kilometros alli.
I submit this as my entry for the the quintessential MexTrek photograph (the essence of a thing in its purest and most concentrated form)

886792256_cmYLm-XL.jpg


This was an excellent road! It wasn't all that long, but it made up for it with great desert riding. Highly recommended!
886791910_DXhBo-XL.jpg


After a couple of hours of really fun riding, we ended up in Ciudad Tula. Time to eat. We made a new friend within 10 seconds of parking our bikes at the town square. Carlos, a young fellow who spoke perfect English, approached us and introduced himself. After a few minutes visiting with him he led us several blocks away to a nice little restaurant.

Milton makes friends wherever he goes.
887834244_ivz2i-L.jpg


Carlos led us to this little, out-of-the-way place for a late lunch/early supper.
887833067_97rfV-L.jpg


Mother and daughter. Stella and her daughter (forgot her name) were running the joint. They spoke perfect English, having recently moved to Tula after 13 years of living in Florida.
I had a hamburger. They aren't the same in Mexico as in the States. :)

887833514_57pNP-L.jpg
 
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Re: Day 3 continued

Hola Milton & Richard,
I checked my GPS and I have the tracks from the Cerro El Viejo mini-expedition that Milton and I did on Saturday. If someone can walk me through the process of uploading them I'll post them. Otherwise the next time I'm in Austin I'll just bring the GPS and you guys can transfer them.
Jimmy
Jimmy. If you can get it into a .gpx file I'll be happy.
You could e-mail it to me and my Google Earth will open it.
PM sent.
 
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886252584_eSEGu-M.jpg

That there, Milton, is a Coatimundi (Coati for short). Thats the reddest one I have ever seen (well, you saw it) but the ones I've encountered have been dark brown/black with only a bit of red.

I'll share my Coati stories with you in person the next time we meet in Mexico.
Actually the proper name is Coati, and "coatimundi" is a misnomer. Member of the racoon family. Called tejón in Mexico, pizote solo in Costa Rica.

Coatis from the rainforest region have upper parts dark brown, shoulders or entire forequarters grizzled gray, tail dark brown, feet dark brown.

Animals from more arid habitats may be paler, tawny brown.

(from Neotropical Rainforest Mammals, A Field Guide by L.H. Emmons)
 
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886252584_eSEGu-M.jpg

Actually the proper name is Coati, and "coatimundi" is a misnomer. Member of the racoon family. Called tejón in Mexico, pizote solo in Costa Rica.

Coatis from the rainforest region have upper parts dark brown, shoulders or entire forequarters grizzled gray, tail dark brown, feet dark brown.

Animals from more arid habitats may be paler, tawny brown.

(from Neotropical Rainforest Mammals, A Field Guide by L.H. Emmons)
Way to show me up Milton! Gah!

Well, someone needs to be fired at the zoo I worked for..... they had a big ol' expensive sign saying "Coatimundi". Its another common name.;-)
 
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Well, someone needs to be fired at the zoo I worked for..... they had a big ol' expensive sign saying "Coatimundi". Its another common name.;-)
:rofl:Interesting.
The Neotropical book doesn't mention the word coatimundi, just Coati. Wikipedia declares "coatimundi" a "misnomer". (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coati)
I, myself, would 've guessed coatimundi was the full name, as I've heard it more often and never heard coati. You're right, it is a common name.

I dunno......
Anyway, you said it was the reddest one you ever saw. Apparantly it's the dry desert climate where the red one's are found.
 
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:rofl:Interesting.
The Neotropical book doesn't mention the word coatimundi, just Coati. Wikipedia declares "coatimundi" a "misnomer". (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coati)
I, myself, would 've guessed coatimundi was the full name, as I've heard it more often and never heard coati. You're right, it is a common name.

I dunno......
Anyway, you said it was the reddest one you ever saw. Apparantly it's the dry desert climate where the red one's are found.
Yeah. We had the black ones at the zoo, then the wild ones I've encountered have been black also, but they were in Costa Rica. The coatis' range is well into south central Texas and even the Big Bend area.... but I am sure they are pretty uncommon.
 
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All I can say about this year's MexTrek is that it was the most fun I have had on a motorcycle since I was a 17 year old kid racing motorcross with Roger Decoster, Torsten Hallman and company in Southern California back in the '70s on my 250 CZ and 400 Maico. Milton, Richard, and my KLR riding partners Sander and Ken were all just fabulous. So were all the other riders we met and rode with on this year's event. I can't wait to go back.

Sander, let me know if you want to plan a mini-MexTrek later this year. I'm in!

Richard, if you decide to do a longer MexTrek type adventure (7-10 days) please let me know. 4 days was not enough!

Bill Payne
San Antonio, TX
2008 KLR 650
2008 Husqvarna TE-510
 
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the most fun I have had on a motorcycle since I was a 17 year old kid racing motorcross with Roger Decoster, Torsten Hallman and company in Southern California back in the '70s on my 250 CZ and 400 Maico. Bill Payne
San Antonio, TX
2008 KLR 650
2008 Husqvarna TE-510
Ahhh..... :doh:So that's why it seemed like you were always right on my butt?:giveup:
 
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I can't wait to go back.

Sander, let me know if you want to plan a mini-MexTrek later this year. I'm in!

Richard, if you decide to do a longer MexTrek type adventure (7-10 days) please let me know. 4 days was not enough!
I'd be interested in a mini trip also. Richard's Thanksgiving weekend won't work out for me so I've be kicking around the idea of doing something in the late summer or early fall.
 
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All I can say about this year's MexTrek is that it was the most fun I have had on a motorcycle since I was a 17 year old kid racing motorcross with Roger Decoster, Torsten Hallman and company in Southern California back in the '70s on my 250 CZ and 400 Maico. Milton, Richard, and my KLR riding partners Sander and Ken were all just fabulous. So were all the other riders we met and rode with on this year's event. I can't wait to go back.

Sander, let me know if you want to plan a mini-MexTrek later this year. I'm in!

Richard, if you decide to do a longer MexTrek type adventure (7-10 days) please let me know. 4 days was not enough!

Bill Payne
San Antonio, TX
2008 KLR 650
2008 Husqvarna TE-510
I'm ready, I did check Galeana weather and it's really warmed up, 108 today, otherwise I'd be ready to go next week.
http://www.weather.com/weather/tenday/MXCA0358

How about late September or early October? I have to be home on Oct 5, otherwise I'm open around that time.

Sander
 
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Dang, I was there last July 4th weekend and it wasn't too bad at elevation. It was 112 on the way back to the border, but not all too bad in and around Galeana, especially with our cooling vests.
 
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Hi All,

Very very nice pcitures guys... wish i could make it this time to hacienda santa engracia... that was my goal for mextrek this year, but i couldnt.

I´ll hope see ya next time!

Roberto



A few more along the road
885454364_mzZsB-L.jpg


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Not long after leaving Pablo’s place, I grabbed my clutch lever and felt a pop as the clutch lever went slack. Did my clutch cable just snap? I had read a few reports on the internet of clutch cable issues with the TE610 so perhaps my bike was experiencing the same issue. I put the bike in neutral and slowed to a stop.

Upon examination I found that the clutch cable was not broken. The engine end of the cable had detached. It just hadn’t been installed correctly and the beating the bike was taking from all the rocks finally made it pop out. That was a relief because I could probably fix that. Riding 5 hours on this road without a clutch wasn’t something I was interested in doing at all.

I couldn’t get the cable end to install correctly, but I did get it mostly back together. Off we went. For a ½ mile and then it popped out again. I repeated the process a 2nd time but a short distance later it once again became detached. I repeated the process one more time and it held for several miles. I thought for sure it was good to go but, alas, off it popped yet again.

By this point we were up in the clouds, it was raining, and it was getting dark. We were losing light and I needed to get this clutch issue sorted out or we were going to be stuck on the mountain all night with no shelter from the rain. This time I decided to start bending metal to see if I could make a permanent fix. Sure enough, it worked. I got the cable end securely seated and it’s still holding today.

But now I had another problem. During all the bending, pulling, cursing, and general disgust something happened to the cable and all the slack was gone. The clutch cable was attached, but now the clutch was engaged and wouldn’t release. I had the slack adjuster on the handlebars completely in but still the clutch wouldn’t disengage. The bike wouldn’t move. I could start it up, put it in gear, release the clutch lever, but the clutch was still engaged so the bike wasn’t going anywhere. Milton and I looked and looked but couldn’t figure out what the issue was and where the system was binding up.

Then, something just popped and the cable went slack. Now I didn’t have a clutch at all. Completely demoralized, I told Milton I was done working on the bike and was just going to ride it off the mountain without a clutch. Once daylight, dry weather, and civilization converged I would try again to fix it.

I told Milton I couldn’t stop and if I did it would have to be on a downhill section or I wouldn’t be able to get the bike going again. With Milton leading, off we went. The STEEP, ROCKY, WET, NO TRACTION, 180º switchbacks were the worst but somehow I managed to make it through the next 5 hours without sliding off a 1000 foot cliff to my death.

Of course, during this time the views were the best of the entire day and I couldn’t stop and take pics. The “Pase del Muerto” (pass of death) was spectacular but I couldn’t stop. Darn it.

Remember that I mentioned Milton had ridden this road before but that it had been about 10 years since the last time? Well, he had taken some pictures the last time he was through here and had brought the pictures with him. During our trip he would periodically stop at a house or village and pass out the pics he had taken last time. It was a very cool thing to do and was well received by everyone.

There was a village (La Mesita I believe) along the way that he had several pictures of. When we stopped everyone in the village came running out to see what was up. It was like a show – the Milton show - had come to town and the folks were excited to see us. Every single person that came out shook hands with both Milton and I. It was just a natural display of courtesy and welcome that really caught my attention.

Saying hello to everyone in the small pueblo.
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Milton passed out the pictures to the crowd and you wouldn’t believe how excited they got. The pics were passed around for everyone to enjoy. Then Milton got out his camera and got some pics of some of the same folks holding their pics from 10 years earlier. I took advantage of the opportunity to get some shots too. I’m not planning on riding this road again but I’m going to pass these pics on to the next person who does so they can give them to these folks.

The citizens of La Mesita
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My clutch issues came to a head after leaving this village so I didn’t get any more photos this day. We finally exited the mountains and made it to civilization about 8 p.m., shortly before dark. Milton knew of a 300 year old hacienda hotel we could stay at. Hacienda Santa Engracia has been in the same family for something like 300 years and is just beautiful. We checked in, unloaded the bikes, and then enjoyed a terrific supper from their kitchen. During the upacking process they brought us a couple of frozen margaritas to help take the edge off.

Enjoying a margarita in our room, after a long day on the bikes
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Hotel Hacienda Santa Engracia is 300 years old and has been owned by the same family the entire time.
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Joined
Jul 2, 2007
Messages
720
Location
Austin
First Name
Milton
Last Name
Otto
Yeah, where is the Hacienda? Milton/Richard what is the approximate cost per night there? More pics of it?
The hacienda ain't cheap, though there are various classes of rooms to choose from.
Richard was so bummed by the bumpy ride and clutch problems that I treated him with the finest room they had, somewhere near $100.
When I showed the receptionist a photo of the heir of the hotel/ex-hacienda, taken some 10 yrs ago, she applied a 20% discount to the tariff.

Ex-Hda Snta Engracia
The coordinates are:
Lat 24° 1'20.99"N
Long 99°16'4.39"W

While googling Santa Engracia for photos I was directed to this site, quite a surprise, an early attempt at a personal web site that I'd forgotten about.
Google Image Result SntaEngracia
 
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