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AUSTIN: Moto First Aid Training ?

Jeff S

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#1
Instead of theadjacking, I'm starting an Austin-specific thread to judge interest in a Austin area moto-oriented first aid training.

Time, content, instructor TBD. Just judging interest right now....
 

Jeff S

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#7
OK - sounds like schedule permitting, this class will 'make'. Let me do a bit of research on a trainer, etc, and I'll propose some times.
 

Jeff S

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#12
Can you define what you mean by moto first aid training?
Vinny offered this:

The problem I have is having the equipment to assist a fallen rider . Hard to carry things. There shouldn't be any open wounds if we ride with our gear. Internal injuries are the issue. Splints have to be made on the field, so I carry wraps.
Everyone should know basic CPR just as a fellow human.
Basically, I'm looking for solutions to medical issues that riders are most likely to see. Perhaps "Adventure" or dual sport focused - where you're a long way from support and you or a fellow rider had an off and needs attention.
 

Jeff S

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#14
Just an update: there's not a Road Guardian trainer in Austin, so we're looking into someone from Houston, Dallas, Corpus, or San Anton. Stay tuned for additional updates...
 

FCBH

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#15
Jeff,

Perhaps the American Red Cross First Aid comprehensive training might fit the ticket. They deal extensively with broken bones, lacerations and other forms of bodily damage that might similar to motorcycle accident.

Several years ago, I came upon a horrific sport-bike crash on Highway 1431. The young rider was in a helmet immobile by the side of the road. It would have been tempting to try to remove the helmet myself, but in fact it can be dangerous since it can aggravate spinal damage unless properly done by a medic or first responder. Interestingly, my Shorai helmet has a special emergency tab on the side that allows first responders to remove just the shell and not the inner lining in case the neck or spine is thought to be involved.

RB
 
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#16
Jeff,

Perhaps the American Red Cross First Aid comprehensive training might fit the ticket. They deal extensively with broken bones, lacerations and other forms of bodily damage that might similar to motorcycle accident.

Several years ago, I came upon a horrific sport-bike crash on Highway 1431. The young rider was in a helmet immobile by the side of the road. It would have been tempting to try to remove the helmet myself, but in fact it can be dangerous since it can aggravate spinal damage unless properly done by a medic or first responder. Interestingly, my Shorai helmet has a special emergency tab on the side that allows first responders to remove just the shell and not the inner lining in case the neck or spine is thought to be involved.

RB
The old adage about not removing helmets and the reasons why are quickly dying. We are probably a couple of years from removing C-Collars and long boards from ambulances for the same reasons.

While the data to support spinal immobilization are weak, there is an increasing amount of evidence noting potential risks and morbidity associated with spinal immobilization. Spinal immobilization has been used to prevent aggravating spinal cord injury. However, in a controversial study done by Hauswald et al, non-immobilized patients in Malaysia had better neurological outcomes than similar injury-matched patients who were immobilized in New Mexico (OR 2.03) [7]. While these studies were conducted in vastly different countries, the overall notion that secondary injury to the cord due to transport is rare because the forces exerted during transport are weak compared to that required to injure the spinal cord may still hold true. Other studies have shown increased mortality (OR 2.06-2.77) in patients with penetrating trauma and spinal immobilization, most likely because it takes time (approximately five minutes, at best [8]) to place a patient into full immobilization, which delays resuscitation and getting the patient into an operating room
http://epmonthly.com/article/ditch-the-board/

http://www.jems.com/articles/print/...research-suggests-time-change-prehospita.html
 

FCBH

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#17
The old adage about not removing helmets and the reasons why are quickly dying. We are probably a couple of years from removing C-Collars and long boards from ambulances for the same reasons.
I defer to your many years of being a medic.

:sun:

Statistically, half (or more) of the motorcycle accidents are still single-vehicle, i.e. going off the road, hitting an immovable object such a curb, car, deer etc. That's not denying that more folks today are distracted via texting and other "multitasking" duties and causing dangers for us guys/gals on two wheels. There's still a large risk in riding totally unrelated to the drivers around us.

Based on having ridden on many group rides, seeing horrific accidents and exchanging war stories about crashes...I have heard my batch of nightmares! I tend to group motorcycle accidents in two basic groups. There is the typical off-road riding crash on a paved or unpaved surface, where the rider has sustained abrasions, broken bones, acute dehydration, etc. but is able to get up (but may be dizzy) on his own effort. A basic first-aid course should help in this area. Related to this, The ride leader should be aware of any major health issues with riders in a group ride may helpful including if that person is diabetic etc...wearing a medical "dog-tag" or ID bracelet helps. I have the ICE feature programmed into my phone too.

The second type of accident is more serious in which the rider that has crashed is rendered unconsciousness. He could have trauma that involves serious bodily damage. This could perhaps involve the possibility of spinal cord and cervical neck damage. The solution is easy if you are on a major roadway region where paramedics are quick to respond. Again, I have been told by various medics to never move the unconscious victim nor to remove the helmet which could make spinal injuries worse. However, you have persuaded me otherwise.

[ame="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QugMcZUf_rU"]Motorcycle First Aid Advice[/ame]

My daughter who was a lifeguard during the summer, took the American First Cross first aid class. The course training lasted for several weeks. They covered a broad number of trauma scenarios that would be similar to that of riding a motorcycle. For basic accidents, having a well equipped first aid kit is essential. If one is far from the civilization, stopping the blood flow, cleaning the would, applying disinfectant, perhaps creating a temporary splint for broken bones and dealing with people who have fallen due to the slippery pool surface.

...if one is carrying a SPOT like device on the motorcycle the question arises, when do you activate the SOS beacon?

At least with the other PLD, they have a two-way texting feature so you can relay the specifics about the accident to first responders. I believe BeemerlessBob was involved in an accident years ago while in New Mexico riding solo on his GS. He activated the SPOT device, but some confusion persisted about his actual location etc. Had he had the two-way texting feature enabled, he could have relayed critical information to the rescue team. I believe he was several days in a remote portion of New Mexico waiting for help. I believe he had broken ribs and other injuries.

...another war story from a TWTEX pie run a few years ago involved riding to the Bluebonnet Cafe with a group of fellow riders. During the ride on Highway 1431, a car bolted from the side and struck a gal on a cruiser I believe. Her leg was crushed. She was taken away by an ambulance. I never heard anymore until a few days later. There was a picture of her in the hospital after having undergone an amputation! She was amazing and had a very resilient personality, which helped a great with the trauma of losing a limb on friendly day ride. The medics responded quickly due to the proximity to Lake Vista. I don't know what I would have done if we were in a remote region. I think you were there at the time. The details are hazy to me since it was my first year of riding. That episode REALLY rattled my confidence.

With your very extensive experience as a medic, why don't you teach the class over a six pack of Coors Lite?

On a related note, with your field experience dealing with motorcycle wrecks etc, what might a good first aid consist of?

...a defibrillator plugged into my SAE plug is not an option.

:lol2:

RB
 
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#18
I recall Kurt giving a show-n-tell of his medical kit at a Ken's coffee trailer lunch meetup. Perhaps we could do another one over dessert doughnuts at the food truck court just down from Billy's some pleasant afternoon.
 

Jeff S

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#19
I recall Kurt giving a show-n-tell of his medical kit at a Ken's coffee trailer lunch meetup. Perhaps we could do another one over dessert doughnuts at the food truck court just down from Billy's some pleasant afternoon.
Yes, there are those among us that are at least as qualified as Road Guardians, but I'm not going to volunteer someone else's time. I'm sticking with the plan to pay well-trained folks who specialize in motorcycle incident medial training. At least, let's see how the Dallas group rates their experience...
 

Traxx

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#21
Well, a Red Cross First Aid course is really a good start. Try to get child/infant as well. This is just like math or science. Break it down to the small parts, and address one thing at a time. Remember your there to provide basic first aid until the pros arrive, anything more and you risk hurting more than helping. Most IFAKs don't have the gear to do what you are looking at, and if it does then it will take up mucho space. Another thing to remember is that you will not remember most of it unless you practice. KISS.
 

Jeff S

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#22
My plan at this time is to wait and see how this class goes. If it gets a :thumb: from the crowd, then I'll replicate that in or near Austin...

That course is scheduled for 14/15 April, so the Austin class won't be before then.
 
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#24
Jeff,
I got my WFA cert from The Expedition School here in Austin. It was taught as Wilderness and Remote Area First Aid–anywhere an ambulance wasn't handy. Certainly applicable to motorcycling. Certainly could be adapted to include more trauma treatment.

Outstanding course. Great people. Terrific outfit.

A great thing about training is that it clarifies what you're trying to accomplish and cuts out a lot of decision-making.

CPR was a prerequisite. Everybody should get CPR training. Only takes a few hours as taught now.

BTW, a good moto IFAK doesn't have to be very big. Really just a quick trauma kit. Let everybody carry their own dang bandaids and immodium.

Good on you, Jeff, for initiating this.
 

Jeff S

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#25
Hi Stevie - yeah, a friend of mind pointed out the expedition school. I'll give them a call. I've been waiting for the original class near Dallas to make, so I could get feedback from that before trying to set this up in Austin. I've been super busy & distracted, too. That class is this weekend, so I'll quiz some from that class, then will call the Expedition folks and try to get something actually on the calendar for the Austinites.
 

Jeff S

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#27
So, I've pretty much failed on this. My next months are going to be hectic - so if anyone wants to pick up the mantle and attempt to organize this class, feel free.... I'd still like to get a class like this under my belt at some point.
 
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#28
I appreciate the bump though. I hadn't heard of the Wilderness and Remote Area First Aid stuff so this bump enlightened me.

Step 1, CPR cert. Step 2, :shrug: . Step 3, get Wilderness and Remote Area First Aid training.
 
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