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My Dual Sport Experiment

StromXTc

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I'm not sure if this one actually counts or not, but I picked up another dirt bike/dual sport type bike yesterday:

View attachment 228285

Electric bikes are a hoot.

288 lbs with more torque than my Africa Twin :D

It is a blast to hooligan this thing around my country roads, quietly.
The Duel Sport Experiment Thread Strikes Back
228286
que heavy breathing
 
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Nov 13, 2007
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Sugar Land, TX
The new Lightning Strike http://lightningmotorcycle.com/lightning-strikes-twice/ track ready 150mph 150 mile range ohlins equipped street bike with 35 minute recharge and $12,995 msrp may wake some otherwise naysaying gas die hards to electric. It also surely stabbed Harley's 110 mile range $29,995 Livewire in the lithium guts.

For the doubters, just look up lightning's ls218 limited production bike thats been blazing around for a couple of years. 218 mph. 168 feet of torque, 200 hp, 100 mile range.
 

Tourmeister

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After a while, on a short wheel base bike, more torque is kind of pointless unless you have a wheelie bar... :flip:

The real kicker for the electric bike is that the max torque is generally available immediately instead of having to build up to it like a gas engine. Add in wheelie control, maybe a little weight on the front fender... and launching it could be a real hoot!

Jarrett, I bet that bike would have been a LOT of fun this past weekend in the DART class!
 

Jarrett

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Jarrett, I bet that bike would have been a LOT of fun this past weekend in the DART class!
Yeah, if I would have had it I would have brought it on the trailer with me. There were several times this past weekend that I wish I had it there.

I'd like to take it back down there sometime and play in the sand with it. I'm hoping to get it out to the local bike trails whenever it stops raining.

It has 70/30 tires on it though, not sure how much fun that would be.
 

Jarrett

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I had the wheels converted to tubeless, added a 12 volt socket, handguards, and a couple of mounts for phone and GPS.

Looking to get a rear rack on it so I can carry some things with it.

That said, you don't really need many tools with it, just a plug kit and CO2 cartridges mainly. But it would be nice to be able to carry some groceries home on occasion as its a blast to ride around town.

They make a removable top case for it. Considering that as well.
 

Jarrett

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Just this deal:

 
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Fm 1681, Stockdale.
Just this deal:

Not what I expected. But I'm sure they have their research, and I'm no scientist.
 
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My buddy is an OSET dealer. I just had lunch with him and he had the top of the line Oset 24.0 R stored sideways in between the front and middle seat of his spinter van. Would you ever consider this with a gas trials bike? 2 stroke fuel, oily chain, grease, etc, etc... Together we've ridden mini bikes like crf150's and ttr125's and crf100's for years and he says the Oset is the ultimate play bike and his favorite so far. Zero maintenance, instant torque, wheelie and stoppie machine. Sure, probably not a match in any way for a gas gas or beta trials bike, but versus the other trunkable motorcycles (z50?) it is king. 112 pounds ready to ride. 1 - 3 hour battery life in trials environment. Constant speed, 15 or 20 miles per hour, about an hour. So not a great motorcycle, but a great play bike in the right environment. And no clutch!!!


 

Tourmeister

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Just this deal:

I'd be willing to bet a LOT of owners will NOT follow that recommendation and will just leave them plugged in all the time. It amazes me that they don't recognize this and just create the necessary electronics to take care of leaving it plugged in after it is charged. Who wants to constantly have to keep checking on it to make sure they unplug it after it is charged. Most folks will want to plug it in and forget about it until their next ride, at which time they will expect it to be fully charged.
 

Jarrett

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I took it for a 30 mile ride today through the local dirt roads. I kept it in Eco mode the whole time, but even in that mode, its still a blast to ride.

It had rained here today a fair amount so the dirt roads were all slick and muddy. Not deep or anything, just enough to get your bike filthy. I was impressed with how much traction it had at 288 lbs with 70/30 tires on it. It only slipped around a couple of times. It's weird not being able to manually downshift, I didn't realize how much I rely on that on the DCT bikes, so you have to actively brake a lot more with this bike.

Once I got used to that, it was just all fun. Laughing out loud during the ride and stuff. The bike is a hoot. You just think and its gone. No engine spooling up, just acceleration. But at the same time, it seems to have more low speed control than the DCT stuff even. I can do 3 mph circles with it easily. Then point it straight, pin the throttle and rockets away. It's deceptive how powerful it is because you don't get a lot of the feedback. Engine noise, vibrations, etc. At one point, I was riding along at 30 mph or so and heard a jingling sound and realized it was my keys rattling. Weird. It feels a lot like being on an Acme jet-powered bicycle. Just creeping along one second and gone the next. They have built a pretty fun bike.

These videos give a decent perspective of riding it:


 
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Nov 27, 2018
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Aubrey, TX
Original Post:

So I've got my Africa Twin and its a fun bike, but big. I've been wondering what it would be like to have a smaller dirt bike that I can throw around and
really run off road with it.

I have a 5 acre pasture at my place and took the Africa Twin in there and it was... not really that fun. Seems like a light, more torquey bike might be more fun there. And on trails that are too tight for the Africa Twin.

I'm a big guy. 260 lbs before putting on all the gear. Over 6 foot tall. Decently strong. So wondering IF (and that's a big if) I wanted to get a "dirt" bike, what should I be looking at? 250? 450? 650?

=========================================
Summary of Thread as of 10/31/2018:

This is here in case you don't want to read it all. I started out looking for a "dirt bike" but I figured out pretty quickly that trying to start being joe dirt bike at age 47 isn't all its cracked up to be.

Changed directions and started looking at mid size dual sport bikes and changed the title of the thread per request to keep the story going.

Highlights:

Post 133 - Bought 2014 CRF250L

Post 222 - Lost interest in CRF250L (after a month and a half of ownership)

Post 388 - Sold CRF250L

Post 420 - Bought 2018 KLR650

Post 544 - Lost interest in the KLR650 (again, bout a month and a half)

Post 584 - Bought a 2016 VFR1200X (on 10/30/2018 - NOT a dual sport bike :))

Post 630 - The KLR sold and the Dual Sport Experiment is officially over

Post 645 - I'm back, kinda... Bought a Zero FX (electric dual sport) on 2/20/19
I had a DRZ 400 and it did everything I needed. Was incredible. You can see YouTube, franks ride on, and watch it keep up with RMZ 450. Yet can go on the road.
 

copb8

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It amazes me that they don't recognize this and just create the necessary electronics to take care of leaving it plugged in after it is charged.
That's exactly what I thought. It's already loaded with computing power how difficult would it be to just monitor charge and input, top it off to optimum and then trickle charge it to keep it there???
 

Jarrett

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Got me. I just plug it in at night (after a ride) and unplug it in the morning when it shows 100%.

Then I don't touch it until I ride it again.
 
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WFO75080

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A KTM 500 can be a full on race bike/woods weapon/dual sport and it comes plated. I can ride it in tight woods or on the highway.
In the tight woods it's not comparable to a 250/300 XCW but it's fairly close. The 1290 (Tank) is just plain scary in tight woods and rocks.
Having all 3 is just about perfect.......
 

Jarrett

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Is the suspension decent for little higher speeds?
I'm too new to really know much about suspension stuff. On the road, the bike feels fine to me. Off pavement, it soaks up little bumps, but jars me a just little bit on faster, bigger hits. Not sure if that's good or bad.

I prefer this bike's suspension to the CFR250L I had. Not as good feeling to me as my Africa Twin with upgraded springs in it. I think it reminds me most of my daughter's NC700X suspension, but with more travel.

Here's what it has on it:

Front suspension: Showa 41 mm inverted cartridge forks, with adjustable spring preload, compression and rebound damping
Rear suspension: Showa 40 mm piston, piggy-back reservoir shock with adjustable spring preload, compression and rebound damping
Front suspension travel: 8.60 in (218 mm)
Rear suspension travel: 8.94 in (227 mm)

I don't know if that's good or bad equipment.
 
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Possible the jarring is being too heavy for stock springs and blowing through travel or riding too low in stroke. For us bigger guys hard to get right without proper springs to start with.
 
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All I know is you have me officially star eyed. In a few years I'm going to have to find one of those. It would be a blast for commuting to work.
 
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Fm 1681, Stockdale.
I'm too new to really know much about suspension stuff. On the road, the bike feels fine to me. Off pavement, it soaks up little bumps, but jars me a just little bit on faster, bigger hits. Not sure if that's good or bad.

I prefer this bike's suspension to the CFR250L I had. Not as good feeling to me as my Africa Twin with upgraded springs in it. I think it reminds me most of my daughter's NC700X suspension, but with more travel.

Here's what it has on it:

Front suspension: Showa 41 mm inverted cartridge forks, with adjustable spring preload, compression and rebound damping
Rear suspension: Showa 40 mm piston, piggy-back reservoir shock with adjustable spring preload, compression and rebound damping
Front suspension travel: 8.60 in (218 mm)
Rear suspension travel: 8.94 in (227 mm)

I don't know if that's good or bad equipment.
That is decent equipment and should be easy to have ser up for you
 

2WheelNut

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I'm too new to really know much about suspension stuff. On the road, the bike feels fine to me. Off pavement, it soaks up little bumps, but jars me a just little bit on faster, bigger hits. Not sure if that's good or bad.

I prefer this bike's suspension to the CFR250L I had. Not as good feeling to me as my Africa Twin with upgraded springs in it. I think it reminds me most of my daughter's NC700X suspension, but with more travel.

Here's what it has on it:

Front suspension: Showa 41 mm inverted cartridge forks, with adjustable spring preload, compression and rebound damping
Rear suspension: Showa 40 mm piston, piggy-back reservoir shock with adjustable spring preload, compression and rebound damping
Front suspension travel: 8.60 in (218 mm)
Rear suspension travel: 8.94 in (227 mm)

I don't know if that's good or bad equipment.
Jarrett....Showa is a good supplier. They are OEM for most Honda stuff and several other brands.

However....stock suspension is typically sprung and valved assuming a 160 to 180 pound rider. I'm heavier than that as I believe you are as well. I typically have all my bikes re-sprung and possibly re-valved to my weight. (sometimes you can just put in heavier fork oil and it will allow the stock valving to dampen the heavier spring) Regardless....it doesn't cost that much and it makes the bike work as it was designed, but for a rider of your weight instead of the generic weight.

The biggest reason your AT probably feels so much better after you had suspension work done was that they probably asked you your weight and put the correct springs and valving in place for you.

Having said all of that..... it matters more when you go faster or demand more out of it. It makes a difference at any speed, just like you've already noticed on your AT, but it really matters if you end up going a bit faster or harder as the bumps impact the bike harder, requiring the suspension to do more.

Bottom line....not sure you need to update it....but you'd notice the improvement if you did.
 
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Jarrett

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Update on this six day old bike:

"Your battery shows some signs of a bad internal crimp connection. This connection issue can cause some of the battery’s energy on high current events to be converted to heat, which can lead to reduced range, power, and increased battery temperatures. We are replacing your battery as a precaution and because it could have an internal defect."
 

Tourmeister

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Update on this six day old bike:

"Your battery shows some signs of a bad internal crimp connection. This connection issue can cause some of the battery’s energy on high current events to be converted to heat, which can lead to reduced range, power, and increased battery temperatures. We are replacing your battery as a precaution and because it could have an internal defect."
New tech always has growing pains... Thanks for being a beta tester :-P
 

Tourmeister

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I've read of Tesla cars doing something similar. It seems that once these batteries ignite, they burn with an extreme intensity!!
 

Jarrett

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Got the bike back Saturday and did a couple of rides with it.

It's gotta better range with the new battery. Range greatly depends on how many times you pin the throttle.

Still a blast to ride around down and in the dirt. Going to try and get it to the single track stuff soon.
 

Jarrett

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It amazes me that they don't recognize this and just create the necessary electronics to take care of leaving it plugged in after it is charged.
I think they do. I happened to be standing next to it when it hit 100% charge last night and heard the charger click off. I think unplugging it is just a safety precaution.
 
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Midlothian, TX
Here's a video showing off road capability - towards the the end, it notes that the bike is programmed to lower its output & performance if it gets too hot, appears that once it cools down its good to go full out again
 

Jarrett

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it notes that the bike is programmed to lower its output & performance if it gets too hot, appears that once it cools down its good to go full out again
I actually did that during the test ride. I got out on 121 and pinned it and just held it at 85 mph (hard computer limit) going down the highway and it got hot. It reduced my speed down to 70, cooled off in seconds and gave me 100% back again. I haven't been able to reproduce it on my personal bike though.

Maybe if I go abuse it on a hot, summer day I'll find it again. It would probably be hard to do offroad.
 

misterk

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Here's a video showing off road capability - towards the the end, it notes that the bike is programmed to lower its output & performance if it gets too hot, appears that once it cools down its good to go full out again
the other video with the rider on Rampart Range Road in CO was neat also.

In this video many of the benefits they speak about I already have:

No sloppy shifts going into corners
Cant' stall
Don't have to worry or think about what gear you are in...

hmmm, what was that thing called again.......oh yea......D C T LOL
 
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