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Need vs. Want...how do you handle it?

Joined
Jun 13, 2006
Messages
5,012
Location
Lewisville
#1
So... I WANT a new bike. More specifically, I want another bike. I don't want to get ride of the bike I have.

I have a 1400 Concours and I love it. I WANT a ZX-6R. I've never owned a small light sport bike, and I think it'd be a hoot and a half.

But. LOL

I haven't ridden as many miles the last two years as I'd like. I feel like I WILL be able to ride a lot more this year than last. But I'd be sorely disappointed in myself if I got it and then rode only as many miles this year as I did last.

How do you go about making the "right" decision for YOU when faced with a dilemma? I'm not asking anyone what *I* should do. LOL I'm just asking for perspectives to help me set my mind. I literally talk myself in and out of it over and over. Yesterday was my birthday and it would have been a terrific birthday present to myself. LOL
 
Joined
Oct 9, 2007
Messages
11,180
Location
Far East DFW
#2
Odd. This is a timely conversation. I just paid off my FJR and am now looking for a sportbike to put next to it in the garage. I've owned one before and cannot wait to get back out on the track and in the twisty bits. My FJR satisfies all my motorcycling NEEDS and some of my wants, but is lacking for some of the wants.

As I'm working on hammering out a deal, I guess you can figure out which way I'm going in relation to your question.

Looking forward to seeing how your decision turns out. In the end, you need to be responsible, but also acknowledge that the years you have left to ride fast motorcycles are limited, so get out and have fun! :D
 
Joined
Jun 13, 2006
Messages
5,012
Location
Lewisville
#4
I've had more than one at a time, which is part of why I tapped the brakes on buying a second one this time around. The last time I had 2, I rode one of them 500 miles in a year. LOL
 
Joined
Mar 30, 2016
Messages
87
Location
Coppell
#5
I actually went through this a few weeks ago. It all started 3 months prior. I've been back and forth with myself on whether I really NEEDED to buy the new bike. My current one was paid for and I didn't want to have 6 months of payments on another bike.

The sensible side of me was strong, because I didn't NEED a new bike. My current bike was satisfying most of my moto wants. But, but but...

I kept looking at bikes on and off during the three months. I knew what I waned - a DL650 with low mileage and no more than 4 years old. So I worked a few deals and kept walking away because the deals just weren't good enough to overpower my sensible sight.

Then one day I walked into Action Kawasaki in Mesquite, knowing they had a 2012 DL650 adventure with 3k miles on the floor. Unlike other DLs I walked away from, this was love at first sit.

The bike spoke to me. It wouldn't have been enough to convince my sensible side, but I got a great deal on it took it home same day.

No regrets. I'm happy and that's all that matters. Life is unpredictable so I might as well enjoy it now.
 

Tourmeister

Keeper of the Asylum
Admin
Joined
Feb 28, 2003
Messages
45,378
Location
Huntsville
#6
:tab If you are paying all your regular bills and meeting your responsibilities, what comes after that is just personal preference. Need is rarely an objective standard. You just have to consider the other things YOU might wish to do with the money versus getting a bike. The problems start when you let other things go so you can buy the bike and those things start to come back to bite you. I mean let's face it, most of us don't REALLY need a bike. We simply have one (or more) because we can and we enjoy it.
 
Joined
Sep 5, 2006
Messages
1,117
Location
Belton, TX
#7
There were times when I had more than one bike in the garage, these days I just keep them one at a time... for now. I regularly commute 16,800 miles in eleven months, and that has a great influence on need versus want. For me I traded the 2011 Ninja 1K for a 2015 Versys LT because the need and want were closely overlapped. The "delta" or cost between the two was minimal at $25.00 more per month. I believe I'll make up that saving with better fuel mileage. Ultimately, the lure of a more comfortable seating position for the 45+ minute commute each way was always in the back of my mind. To add ABS and Traction Control was a bonus. When I learned that hard bags for the 2011 were no longer available, it sealed the deal to move to another bike.

The need/want equation was also tipped because I envisioned even more time in the saddle. Time will tell if I made a smart decision.
 
Joined
Jan 22, 2011
Messages
5,302
Location
At the back of the pack and out of the dust
#8
Years ago there was the Barn Find of the Gods. '26 Indian and three newer, a handful of Harley flatheads, a post war Zundap, another handful of Brit iron and more 70s-90s UJMs than could be cataloged. I wanted it all, but with two projects in the garage, passed on all. Eventually I ended up with an RD400 Daytona for my trouble that is still in the way in my barn.

My primary transportation is a bike, but for most it is nothing but a toy and that is just a want. To add to Tourmeister's point, if you have enough money on hand to sock away the price of the bike into a retirement account AND buy the bike, then do both.
 
Joined
Feb 16, 2005
Messages
2,442
Location
Dallas
#9
As I have gotten older and the acceptance that riding and living will come to an end, my priorities have changed. I am a lot more likely to buy what I want and enjoy it while I can.
 
Joined
Oct 9, 2007
Messages
11,180
Location
Far East DFW
#11
I let the budget handle it, and don't finance toys. It's a self-limiting situation until I make my millions, at which time we'll have to revisit the strategy.
I went that route for a while. Came up with a genius plan to get the FJR. It required some wheeling and dealing with the wife though.

She's had surgery and we had to put a bunch of that on credit and were paying it off, but the CC interest rate was pretty high and kicking our butts. I bought the FJR on credit through my bank with a low interest rate loan, then sold my old bike and took the cash from that sale and paid off the expensive credit card situation. Thus, I upgraded my bike while moving high interest debt to low interest debt.

I could have straight up sold the old bike and paid the CC's for sure, but I'd have been bikeless for a while and that's my primary transportation, so this worked out and now it's paid for. :D
 
Joined
Jun 13, 2006
Messages
5,012
Location
Lewisville
#13
It's not REALLY about the money...it's the power-to-weight ratio. LOL If I WANTED it badly enough I can afford the bike and never ride it. LOL But that isn't any fun. When I sold my VTX, it was like "Well, paying insurance, I spent 60 cents a mile on that bike that year. That's stupid."
 

budzrex

Forum Supporter
Joined
Apr 26, 2004
Messages
4,146
Location
New Braunfels Texas
#18
I'm betting it's a street bike ???

Yes something rather sporting even though i really want a
newer dirt bike instead (something more modern than the 92) but it was one of those I lusted after
when it came out bikes and it is a great bike at a great price
 
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OldTLSDoug

Living the Dream.
Forum Supporter
Joined
May 1, 2008
Messages
1,667
Location
Glen Rose
#22
I am sporting five of them right now, amazingly, four of them are '06 models and one is an '07. I got down to one and then I got offered "deals" from my buddies. I have a free trials bike that I am at about $1150.00 into with parts.

I bought a used Gixxer 750 and I think it was one of the best purchases I made. It is already track sorted, and I love the thing, so my buying price was cash money. The other bikes are paid for as well.

My best advice to any motorcycle junkie is to fix your own bikes, and get a little one to putt around the neighborhood on. I have a Ruckus that I love to go zipping around on when I get home. It is just like riding a big one, but it is way more laid back. The Ruckus has taken the sting out of many a bad day. Before that I have had a zillion little bikes to play with.

I am going to be 58 this year, I still ride at the racetrack because I love it. I am currently trying to get in better shape so I can ride the track into my 70's. If I can't ride on the track anymore, I will ride on the street. I will even ride a three wheeler if it comes to it. I love to ride, I love sporty scooters, and I love to meet folks and talk about motorcycles.

So, this old fat man would tell you, buy the bike, stare at it, sit on it, work on it, clean it, show it to folks, and enjoy it. You cannot overestimate the value of having some motorcycle therapy out there in the garage. Even a broken one provides enjoyment (sometimes I think I like the broken ones even more) so BUY THE BIKE! Don't look back, don't over analyze it, just enjoy the motorcycle and your life.

Be Good, Wear Gear, Do Wheelies...

 
Joined
Aug 1, 2010
Messages
547
Location
Houston, TX
#25
As I have gotten older and the acceptance that riding and living will come to an end, my priorities have changed. I am a lot more likely to buy what I want and enjoy it while I can.
This. At 62 I am not getting younger. :eek2: I started riding in 2008 at age 55. Now, after 90K+ miles I am on bike number three, 2009 Goldwing. I did not NEED any of it but it was time to do what I WANT and not just what I NEED. all subject to budget considerations of course. I am crazy, not stupid. So far I have not financed a bike, cars yes, bikes no.

I actually spotted the 'Wing at the Honda shop while buying a tire for my NT700. It was still available a month later and I succumbed to the Siren's call.:rider:
 

Crew Chief

Forum Supporter
Joined
Nov 11, 2007
Messages
3,287
Location
Rendon TX
#26
This is a tough one and there certainly isn't one "right" answer. I've helped a lot of people through times of financial hardship and that affects my thinking. My basic premise is that I don't like to borrow money and will not do it for toys. Using this philosophy, I have assets in my garage rather than liabilities. It has also allowed me to retire at the ripe old age of 56.

I was never real good at the work/life balance stuff and worked too much. richmillertxs' idea is some of what drove me to retire, although I also liked Tourmiesters' comment on meeting responsibilities. I met our financial responsibilities, ensured that we have our basic needs were met then carved out a portion of our savings to use for "lifestyle". I hope it will take 30 years or so to see how it works out. If we wind up as old people with no money or die with a big bank account before then means I didn't get it quite right.

We are very fortunate to live in a time and a place where we can worry about such issues.
 
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Joined
Oct 9, 2007
Messages
11,180
Location
Far East DFW
#27
Don't forget also that life is most likely shorter than you think it might be. I've had friends that passed away far too young thinking they'd have long lives. Don't put off that wrist twisting grin for tomorrow because tomorrow isn't promised.

Today in fact marks the passing of one of those friends. :(
 
Joined
Jan 22, 2011
Messages
5,302
Location
At the back of the pack and out of the dust
#28
Don't forget also that life is most likely shorter than you think it might be. I've had friends that passed away far too young thinking they'd have long lives. Don't put off that wrist twisting grin for tomorrow because tomorrow isn't promised.

Today in fact marks the passing of one of those friends. :(
Amen to that. I've had the good fortune to take two sabbaticals over the years and they are the best. Even if one does live a long life, old age may make riding impossible. Sorry about the loss of your friend.
 
Joined
Apr 18, 2007
Messages
5,490
Location
Salado
#29
As I have gotten older and the acceptance that riding and living will come to an end, my priorities have changed. I am a lot more likely to buy what I want and enjoy it while I can.
Absolutely! You never know what's going to happen. We've prepared for the future as best we can and now do what we want when we want.
 
Joined
Mar 12, 2010
Messages
1,178
Location
Fort Worth
#32
I've owned a C14 and I've owned a ZX-6R. I say do it.

The decision for me is whether I want to do a type of riding that I can't based on the current stable, or will some bike better replace what's in the garage for a type of riding that I do.

I started on a Ninja 500 for my first bike, then switched to a cruiser because I thought they were cool. After my first long-distance trip I realized I loved riding cross-country but hated my cruiser for it, so I went through a few different bikes to meet that need. When I got into track days I went through several bikes to meet that need. Right now I'm kicking around the idea of getting better at dirt, or at least Texas dual-sport so I'm eyeing bikes to fit that role.

I can say for sure that a ZX-6R is a different enough bike from the C14 that it's worth having both. The C14 is very comfortable to ride and has some giddyup, but the ZX-6R is the motorcycling experience distilled. It's uncomfortable and impractical, but it's like the bike just jacks straight into your brain and does whatever you ask it to do RIGHT NOW.
 
Joined
Feb 6, 2006
Messages
237
Location
Coppell, TX
#35
Go for it! It's pretty hard to find 1 bike that does everything. If I had to own just one, I guess I would have fun trying to figure it out. Truth is, I usually have 2 or 3 around. Right now I have a Harley Ultra Classic Limited and a Kawasaki Ninja 1000 (sometimes I just want to go fast!).

I had nothing but sportbikes for years and I can't seem to completely get that out of my system, so the N1K is a great compromise at my advanced age. Although lately I have been lusting after another Ducati. That Multistrada Pikes Peak is way cool! Might be time to flip the Kawasaki...
 
Joined
Jun 13, 2014
Messages
645
Location
Denton
#36
I want to sell my house
I need to be one two wheels again but as long as I own a money pit it will not happen. So listing the house next week. It's all about priorities. Problem...... solution.....
;-)
 
Joined
Mar 17, 2009
Messages
958
Location
Weatherford
#37
You don't ever "need" them. If you get ones you like, you'll ride'em. Saw a Ninja 1000 ABS at Granbury Powersports last weekend. It had old man friendly handle bars. Very tempting...
 

Tourmeister

Keeper of the Asylum
Admin
Joined
Feb 28, 2003
Messages
45,378
Location
Huntsville
#38
I want to sell my house
I need to be one two wheels again but as long as I own a money pit it will not happen. So listing the house next week. It's all about priorities. Problem...... solution.....
;-)
There are times I wish I did not have a mortgage... For that matter, there are even times I wish I was single with no kids. That side of me longs to wander the world on a shoestring budget. However, my wife and kids like having a house... I like my wife and kids... so... I have a mortgage :-P

I am fortunate that I can also have a few bikes. It REALLY IS therapy. I don't get to ride like I used to before having kids. But now, even a short 45-60 mile ride does wonders for my attitude. It is almost as if I can just feel the stress draining from my body as I pull out of the driveway for a ride.
 
Joined
Feb 10, 2016
Messages
86
Location
Missouri City,TX
#39
I have two bikes and ride both of 'em...the little Honda actually gets ridden a bit more than the Harley.

I really want to get a new 2016 Suzuki Bandit to add to my stable, but it's hard for me to justify spending $10K OTD for a third bike...I think about it every day. lol

I've looked at some used but they just didn't float my boat...I'm retired and have no mortgage, so I may have to spend some of my son's inheritance money. :trust:
 
Joined
Jun 6, 2007
Messages
151
Location
austin
#42
Timely question. I really enjoy my Versys, most fun I've had on 2 wheels in a while. But, I really want a Bonnie. I can't ride enough to justify 2 bikes right now and I'm afraid I won't enjoy a Bonnie as much as I do the Versys.
 
Joined
Oct 9, 2007
Messages
11,180
Location
Far East DFW
#45
Hmm, wonder if that's a section that's behind the login.

Long story short, his family member who has put work first all his life and is 70 and still works like 50 hours a week just had two strokes in two days and is dealing with the fact that he's losing major mobility and moving into a forced retirement. The poster was hit with the fact that you never know when something is going to happen to take away what you love to do, so do it now.
 
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Joined
Mar 30, 2016
Messages
87
Location
Coppell
#46
Hmm, wonder if that's a section that's behind the login.

Long story short, his family member who has put work first all his life and is 70 and still works like 50 hours a week just had two strokes in two days and is dealing with the fact that he's losing major mobility and moving into a forced retirement. The poster was hit with the fact that you never know when something is going to happen to take away what you love to do, so do it now.
Fully agree. This is why I'm changing jobs now (starting a new one end of this month). Getting out of management and creating more time for my hobbies and things I want to do. Because you never know when your number comes up.

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Crew Chief

Forum Supporter
Joined
Nov 11, 2007
Messages
3,287
Location
Rendon TX
#47
.....Getting out of management ....
I see a small but definite trend with that. Almost all among first and second level managers. I took it a step further than you did and just got out totally.

I will add back in a word of caution here. A lot of folks including me are counseling to make sure there is adequate life in the work life balance, but we should not have to over extend ourselves to do it. I'm about to start taking trips that I could never take before on a bike that I didn't have and I'm really looking forward to it, but the things I find the most luxurious are simply taking the time to enjoy a nice spring day and spending time with my wife on the property we own. Among the few stresses I have in my life now are those that involve expenditures for niceties.

In the end I guess that I would say that a person needs to ensure that they own their stuff rather than than being owned by it.
 
Joined
Mar 30, 2016
Messages
87
Location
Coppell
#48
I see a small but definite trend with that. Almost all among first and second level managers. I took it a step further than you did and just got out totally.

I will add back in a word of caution here. A lot of folks including me are counseling to make sure there is adequate life in the work life balance, but we should not have to over extend ourselves to do it. I'm about to start taking trips that I could never take before on a bike that I didn't have and I'm really looking forward to it, but the things I find the most luxurious are simply taking the time to enjoy a nice spring day and spending time with my wife on the property we own. Among the few stresses I have in my life now are those that involve expenditures for niceties.

In the end I guess that I would say that a person needs to ensure that they own their stuff rather than than being owned by it.
Indeed. Either extreme is bad, and its all about balance. That's what I've been working to achieve in my life.

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