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Royal Enfield Himalayan

Joined
Mar 1, 2012
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43
Location
katy,tx.
Recently met a rider on a new Himalayan. Looked like a bike that could be fun on the back roads and secondary highways and a bike that would not be hard to maintain(old school design). Anyone out there riding one? kenray in katy
 
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Fm 1681, Stockdale.
There was a thread somewhere around here, I think one user has one.
I know the power to weight ratio was a concern for some guys.
 
Joined
Oct 16, 2013
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San Antonio
At nearly 500lbs I wouldn't be throwing it in the 'great for dualsport' category anytime soon. Only person I know with one is new to dirt and isn't a member here that I am aware of.
 

jqueen

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It's more mini-ADV than dualsport. But also keep in mind that 426lb is not the dry weight it is the "curb weight" which seems to have different meanings for different manufacturers. I searched and can't find where anybody has actually weighed one, so whether that includes a full tank of gas is unknown.

But it does include centerstand, pannier rack, tail rack, crash guards at the tank and lower for the engine, low fender + half high fender for the front wheel.

Take all that into account, and it appears to be pretty comparable to a DR650/XR650l/KLR. You either add that stuff to those bikes, or take it off the Himalayan. I don't think it's even trying to compete with KTM, and for one, I'm really glad it's out there and selling. I see the big hole in the market as between the DR650 and the KTM690. Make a bike that weighs 10-15lbs less than the DR650, with 10lbs more HP, and price it right between current DR650 and KTM690. As long as it could still carry luggage and wasn't a maintenance queen, I think it would sell well.

Of course it doesn't cost a lot less to develop/make one of those than it does to make a 690, but they would sell for less, so I get why it's not out there. I just think there's a gap. I actually don't like the 690 - it just doesn't feel "right" when I've ridden them. Great bikes, just don't like them. Same with V-stroms. On paper they should be perfect bikes for me, but I've ridden my brother's quite a bit and just don't like it. On the flip side I had a 1st gen Versys I liked a lot, and my brother just didn't.

Choices be good.
 

Monica

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I've been meaning to stop by the motorcycle shop that carries these, just out of curiosity. The bike is way to heavy for me but I do appreciate it's utilitarian handsomeness. I watched a guy's vlog about riding his new Himalayan from Seattle back to AK I believe (waiting on Part 6 to come out). This bike came up as a direct competitor to the BMW G310GS in another view. I ended up going down a rabbit hole lol
His video has some beautiful scenery. Up to this point it doesn't focus on being a bike review per say, but more about his journey on it. The guy has some really good talent and a beautiful eye, but skipped forward through some stuff cause I wasn't in ans artsy-fartsy mood and the guy can really go into detail appreciating a task. Sometimes I don't need the catharsis, just the gist lol

 

Jeff S

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It seems like everyone and their mother is trying to make an "adventure" bike these days.
I'm glad they are! These are so good at so many things. Like the SUV fad that took over the auto industry - very comfortable, good on the highway, can do dirt (to varying degrees), and good looks to boot.
 
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Euless
I'm glad they are! These are so good at so many things. Like the SUV fad that took over the auto industry - very comfortable, good on the highway, can do dirt (to varying degrees), and good looks to boot.
Hey, that's my rides :trust:
 

Tourmeister

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:tab As good as many Adventure/DS bikes are on the pavement now, I am not sure I will ever own another street only bike. I mean, if I were to suddenly come into large amounts of money, maybe. Otherwise, I see no real need. I like the ability to cruise at highway speeds and have great handling in the twisties, but then be able to go explore little unpaved side roads as the mood hits me. Unless it starts getting really steep or rough, my 1200 GS pretty much does it all very well. For here in the States, I don't know that I would mess with the Enfield unless I was just in the mood to have something a little out of the ordinary.

For some place like rural India, I could see the Enfield being a smart choice. Those bikes have been there forever. They have produced them in prodigious quantities for years. Guys living in sheet metal shacks know how to fix them with minimal parts. All those guards make sense. You aren't looking to be able to blast down highways at 60+ mph. You are looking for relatively reliable transport that can get you most anywhere at 45-50mph tops. That they are finally starting to modernize the bikes a bit is great. Although, I fear that too much modernization might do away with the benefit of them being able to be repaired almost anywhere by just about anyone.
 

Monica

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I just looked at more videos and pics and now I cant wait to go sit on one.

It seems like everyone and their mother is trying to make an "adventure" bike these days.
Not a bad thing, especially of they trend towards lighter weight and shorter seat heights. Competition is good for us consumers.
 
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Fm 1681, Stockdale.
I just looked at more videos and pics and now I cant wait to go sit on one.


Not a bad thing, especially of they trend towards lighter weight and shorter seat heights. Competition is good for us consumers.
I agree. I think we need more options like the tenere 700 that's coming out. But the short inseam folks need light weight bikes too.

Honda needs to do a crf500 rallye
 

JQ1.0

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Graham, Texas
On Friday of Roll the Bones 2018 there was a Himy with our group for a short gravel and paved ride. While we weren't settin any speed records we were getting around at a fairly spirited pace and he had no problem keeping up in the dirt or the tarmac. I got a good look at it when we stopped for lunch and I believe it to be the best looking bike at the ride. Can't remember his name or handle, but he should be able to give a good review. Different strokes and all that. I'd ride it.
 

Monica

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I agree. I think we need more options like the tenere 700 that's coming out. But the short inseam folks need light weight bikes too.

Honda needs to do a crf500 rallye
On for sure. I got a little offended when the BMW guy guestimated my inseam to be only 27". It's 28 and a half, sir. :argh:
 

Rick M

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Sep 27, 2007
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Belton,Tx
I have owned one since about July just because I went to TJ's cycle in Austin and one was sitting on the floor... I liked the look - I sat on it and could flat foot it and I am 5'8" tall and about 195lbs. I am 59 years old now and have owned just about every dual sport bike on the market including Ktm 690's. This bike is low on power but the chassis is great and it is just a fun bike. I have installed a programmer and helped the power some but it is what it is. My buddies will tell you I have no problem keeping up with them and 75 mph is fast enough on gravel which is where I spend most of my time. I love it , it was 5500 OTD and that doesn't hurt even if I end up hating it. I have saddle bags stuffed with stuff, tank bag and everything I need mounted to it . This bike takes me back to the 70's and 80's when bikes were simple and not 37 inches at the seat . The suspension does it's job well , holds plenty of fuel, it is the closest "Ready to Ride" cheap dual sport bike on the market. Two of my buddies I ride with have purchased them and are happy ... At this point I have no regret and it gets lots of looks . The most common statement is " That is a cool looking bike" Rick M
 

Monica

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I stopped by the Motorcycle shop yesterday but they had just sold the one they had. Going to have to wait a couple weeks for the next shipment to come in. The guy said they're selling fast. While I was there a guy called and asked if they had any. Seems word is getting out about them.
 

jqueen

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I stopped by the Motorcycle shop yesterday but they had just sold the one they had. Going to have to wait a couple weeks for the next shipment to come in. The guy said they're selling fast. While I was there a guy called and asked if they had any. Seems word is getting out about them.
I was at the Triumph/BMW/Ducati dealer in Plano a week or two ago and they had 2, not sure if that's where you went or not (was thinking you were around DFW from prior posts, but not sure).
 

Monica

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I was at the Triumph/BMW/Ducati dealer in Plano a week or two ago and they had 2, not sure if that's where you went or not (was thinking you were around DFW from prior posts, but not sure).
Ah ok, yeah I know the place you're talking about. Use to go by there when I lived up in DFW. These days I'm in San Antonio. Place I went to was a tiny place called The Motorcycle Shop on the east side of town. Also it would be nice if there was a closer Ducati dealer than Austin, I'd like to see the Sixty2 as well.
 

Windmill

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I stopped by the Motorcycle shop yesterday but they had just sold the one they had. Going to have to wait a couple weeks for the next shipment to come in. The guy said they're selling fast. While I was there a guy called and asked if they had any. Seems word is getting out about them.
Did they have any new 650 twins? Interceptor
 

Baja_Bound

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Mar 25, 2012
Messages
78
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San Antonio
I enjoyed sitting on the Himmy the week they arrived from Fort Worth (the US distributor). This was the second one that the Motorcycle Shop in SA received, the first being white and sold the day before. The bike was plush feeling, low to the ground, and had that nostalgic feel. I did not pull the trigger as I wanted to wait and see how parts availability would be. In the meantime, I purchased an older KLR650 which is serving me well.

29192958767_ae3c60c94c_b.jpg


Funny and ironic ending to the story. The next week my wife and I answered an ad for a Yamaha XT225 on Craigslist. He had just bought a new bike a few days prior and did not need his old XT225. We went into his garage and their sat his new Royal Enfield Himalayan, the exact same bike I sat on at the Motorcycle Shop in SA. It turned out he went and looked at the bike the same day I had, and purchased it the next day. I have since spoke with him and he is enjoying it. His only complaints being 1) there are few after market products available and 2) he feels underpowered on highway riding.
 

Monica

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Did they have any new 650 twins? Interceptor
I don't recall seeing any but I wasn't looking for them.

D’Moto in San Antonio is a Ducati dealer. Triumphs too!
Oh that's good to know. I'll chk it out.


I enjoyed sitting on the Himmy the week they arrived from Fort Worth (the US distributor). This was the second one that the Motorcycle Shop in SA received, the first being white and sold the day before. The bike was plush feeling, low to the ground, and had that nostalgic feel. I did not pull the trigger as I wanted to wait and see how parts availability would be. In the meantime, I purchased an older KLR650 which is serving me well.

View attachment 227051

Funny and ironic ending to the story. The next week my wife and I answered an ad for a Yamaha XT225 on Craigslist. He had just bought a new bike a few days prior and did not need his old XT225. We went into his garage and their sat his new Royal Enfield Himalayan, the exact same bike I sat on at the Motorcycle Shop in SA. It turned out he went and looked at the bike the same day I had, and purchased it the next day. I have since spoke with him and he is enjoying it. His only complaints being 1) there are few after market products available and 2) he feels underpowered on highway riding.
So now I know where it went! 😁

Looks like you're up on your toes. That means I'll definitely be reaching.
 
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Monica

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Texas
This bike.... 😍

Sat on it at the shop today. I'm up on my tip toes, but easier to keep up than I thought it would be. Seat cushion has a lot of thickness in it, 2"-3" of foam and almost a suede-like feel on the cover (it isn't suede I don't think). Handlebars are nice and upright. Big hefty bar ends on there too.. Standing up was easy (bike on the center stand). Huge foot pegs and thick rubber. This thing is built like a tank, or at least implies it. It's welds on the frame are exposed and in your face. It's got rough edges that add character, it isn't flawless and seems like it ain't ashamed of it either. The matte color is awesome. The personality on this thing intrigues me so. It's utilitarian and handsome. Started it up, it got a decent note. The front 21" wheel seems huge! Rear is a 17".

I probably would have slept at the shop so I could look at it it all night, but I had to beat traffic home so I had to go. I kinda want. But thinking about all I'd need to do to ride.

Anyway, pics...


227804

227805
227806
 

Tourmeister

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If you go off the pavement and get into rocks or ruts of any size, that 21" makes a big difference in how the bike handles.

So what are they asking for that bike? Is it fuel injected?
 

Tourmeister

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Double front fender? Interesting.

Tourmeister, yes, it is FI.
The low fender helps keep spray/mud down. If it gets, bad, you can probably remove it. I think the high fender is for looks and maybe deflecting mud/spray away from the underside of the dash/wires.
 

Monica

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Yup, FI'd. Heck I didn't even ask price but I think it's about $4400 remembering their website info.
The guy Steve said his buddy removed that top fender on his Himalayan. Said he liked the classic look without it. He did say it does block a little airflow up under the headlight too. Interesting about the headlight design, it stays stationary when the wheel/bar turns. I think it's attach to the frame or front tank area (didn't spy in too closely).

A nice touch is both brake lines are braided steel. I was surprised, typically manfs go with rubber for costs. And the suspension squishes a little when you get on so there's room to the ground.
 
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Windmill

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My experience with RE motors if you break them in correctly they never give problems. I like how easy it is to service oil filter and spark plug. When I bought mine they charged me an import fee and tried to do an assembly fee. I paid the TTL and import fee. Monica dis you notice the specs on suspension travel? That rear rack crash guards and wind shield and bash guard (skid plate) save over 5 hundred. I like the 21 inch front wheel compared to some 19 inch dual sports like the Wee.
 

Monica

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My experience with RE motors if you break them in correctly they never give problems. I like how easy it is to service oil filter and spark plug. When I bought mine they charged me an import fee and tried to do an assembly fee. I paid the TTL and import fee. Monica dis you notice the specs on suspension travel? That rear rack crash guards and wind shield and bash guard (skid plate) save over 5 hundred. I like the 21 inch front wheel compared to some 19 inch dual sports like the Wee.
That said, what's your method breaking in the motor? I read a few methods for the bike and curious how each went.

You're right about the racks and guards - this bike is ready to roll, just add your bags. Maybe side racks if you need but honestly, one could load out and fill up the way it comes off the showroom floor.

I didn't catch the susp travel on it while I was there (sorry guys, I lose my brain when I toy shop). Online vids show it at 200mm travel w 41mm forks up front, 180mm in the rear.

For the front wheel I don't have much, really any offroad exp so wheel preference all I know is larger is better.
 

Windmill

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Mine was 500cc Classic but I never got it over 45-50 mph for 500 miles and varied the speeds and kept RPM down (by feel and noise) Then change the oil. The book may say part synthetic but I ran 20-50 Valvoline full Synthetic. I put nearly 10K on bike 2014 and never had a problem. I just get tired of bikes but the RE was my all time favorite. It liked 70 mph and below. It had great low end torque. I may buy one of the 650 twins from them next year. Just make sure what you can and can't do to keep warranty. You may have to have them do first service then after tat you can. Valves on mine were hydraulic and need no adjustment. RE headlights are the best I have ever seen. I always got 70mpg
 

StromXTc

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Still sounds tall as you describe. Perhaps not heal plant but at least ball of foot would be best for you considering the weight you need to be able to control. You may want to research some lowering strategies. Perhaps even in just the forks would do it for you. One thing for sure, you would surly be Miss Badace on a bike like this
 

StromXTc

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2018 Royal Enfield Himalayan Specs
Suspension (front): Telescopic 41mm forks, 7.9 in. (200mm) travel
Suspension (rear): Monoshock; 7.1 in. (180mm) travel, preload adjustable
Seat Height: 31.5 in. (29.9 in. w/ low saddle option)
Ground Clearance: 9 in.
Wet Weight: 401 lbs.
Tires (front): 90/90-21
Tires (rear): 120/90-17
Brakes (front): 300mm single disc, 2-piston floating caliper
Brakes (rear): 240mm single disc, single piston floating caliper
Alternator Output: 220 Watts
Engine Type: Single cylinder, air-cooled, 4 stroke, SOHC
Displacement: 411cc
Max. Power Output: 24.5 BHP @ 6500 RPM
Max. Torque: 26 ft-lbs @ 4200 RPM
Fuel System: Fuel injected
Fuel Capacity: 4 gal
Fuel Efficiency: 70 MPG (estimated)
Gearbox: 5 speed
Colors: Snow and Granite
MSRP: $4,499
 
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Tourmeister

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Whoa, there's a low seat option? That knocks off a significant height!
I bet you could easily lower it just messing with the suspension. Depending on the rear suspension linkage, you might be able to just replace a single piece with a different length and change the rear height. Up front, you can probably raise the fork tubes in the triple clamp at least 1". If you don't weigh much, you can probably use shorter preload spacers in the forks, which will let the bike settle a bit more. Don't forget that you'd need to shorten the kickstand as well.

220 watts is decent for the alternator. That could run heated grips, some LED lights, and possibly a heated vest if needed. Replacing the headlight bulb with an LED bulb would free up some power for accessories.
 

Windmill

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still pretty chubby at 400 pounds and 24.5bhp, but real good torque 26 lbs, I am sure a pipe and a update on cdi and air cleaner will give some more hp. But just fine the way it sets.
 

Tourmeister

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still pretty chubby at 400 pounds and 24.5bhp, but real good torque 26 lbs, I am sure a pipe and a update on cdi and air cleaner will give some more hp. But just fine the way it sets.
I don't think this bike was ever about ground pounding power, but rather just getting there... I bet if a rider takes their time, this bike will get them pretty much anywhere. Keep in mind that in India, they probably aren't going to be doing much 70mph+ freeway blasting.
 

Tourmeister

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G
It's my understanding that its never a great idea to only lower one end of the bike, you want to lower both at a similar rate. You will end up affecting the overall handling.
Generally speaking, this is true. Some bikes may be more sensitive to such changes than others. For instance, a long wheel base cruiser with raked out forks probably won't be as sensitive as a short wheel based bike with steep forks.
 

StromXTc

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Another RE. better quality for the products . Seemed important to mention here.

Royal Enfield Continental GT
royal-e-continental-crouch-desk-1540482460.jpg

MANUFACTURER IMAGE
Base Price: $5,999
The Royal Enfield brand has 100 years of history behind it, but the name hasn’t held much sway with American bikers in recent years. The reason is twofold: middling build quality and an incomplete product lineup. But lately the motorcycle company based in India has been eager to expand and has doubled down on quality.
Early next year, Royal Enfield will offer its first twin-cylinder motorcycles in a long time, and will do so at a very reasonable price. The 650-cc Continental GT and Interceptor models are all new from the frame up and promise to be far more robust than any Royal Enfield that has come before. The Continental GT looks like it rolled right out of the 1970s. We dig it. And because Royal Enfield has largely operated under the radar, buying one means you probably won’t see many others parked at your local bike hangout
 
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The Himalayan was on my short list whenever I traded my Ural for a KLR. The Kawasaki dealership was just closer than the RE dealer and I was afraid the Ural might not make it all the way to the RE dealership for a trade :-)

Still happy with the KLR, but Royal Enfield really has my interest right now. Both with what's been released recently with the Himalayan and the 650cc twins and with whatever they're cooking up next.
 

Windmill

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The Himalayan was on my short list whenever I traded my Ural for a KLR. The Kawasaki dealership was just closer than the RE dealer and I was afraid the Ural might not make it all the way to the RE dealership for a trade :-)

Still happy with the KLR, but Royal Enfield really has my interest right now. Both with what's been released recently with the Himalayan and the 650cc twins and with whatever they're cooking up next.
Reliability change with RE in 2010 with the unit motors. They are getting better all the time. The twins can be bought in USA now, I am not ready financially, maybe next year.
 
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