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Texas T's Tumultuous Texas Trip

Texas T

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If I fail to recognize anyone in this story please forgive me as it was not intentional, but if I fail to write things down they tend to disappear from my head. First, let me recognize kickstand-prophet (Drew), beemerless bob (Bob), gixxerjasen (Jasen), mitchntx (Mitch), dancing with curves (Chris), and JIm. I'll give further details later in this story.

Several things happened to make this trip come together; first was the fact that this was going to be the 15th Anniversary of the very first TWT Pie Run, even though this type of event wasn't called a Pie Run yet when it first began. Next was the fact that I retired four days earlier, and I now had the time to leave on a Friday in order to make the event on Saturday. Last was permission from SWMBO - she does not like it when she doesn't get to go on a ride, but this was going to be an IBA SaddleSore attempt (1,000+ miles in under 24 hours) in cold temperatures, and since her stroke she does not have the stamina or the cold endurance to handle something like this. After much cajoling and logical discussion she said "fine, do what you want". Now women, you know this means "you better not"; but men, we hear that and we think "yes, she's okay with it". Yes, I knew she really wanted to go but deep down she also understands that there is no way she could handle it.

(Don't worry, she doesn't know it yet but I'm going to take her on a ride to Alaska and Banff in June and it will be a slow, warm, flower-sniffing tour as opposed to the original plan of a Hyder to Hyder Iron Butt certification ride)

Next up was checking the bike over and getting everything packed. Tires: rear (Pirelli run flat car tire) - good, front (Avon touring) - ok, but should have another 2,000 miles easily left in it for this trip. Oil: checked and filled. Other misc stuff: checked. Even though it was just me I went ahead and loaded extra clothes in the Pakit Rak I run on the back of the Wing. This thing is so handy I never even remove it between trips. It's one of the best purchases I've made for a touring bike. I pulled my Rtic jug out of the freezer (a frozen jug and hydration hose doesn't grow mold) and placed into my MotoJug holder on the back seat. Gear: My Roadcrafter is ready for a ride; got a new Buff Polar headgear (which I love); my new Warm & Safe heated undershirt has arrived; one pair of warm weather Lee Parks Deer Tour gloves which is what I wear 99% of the time; two pairs of winter gloves including one pair by @Ken Phenix; my trusty LD Comfort leggings; and my Oxtar Matrix boots. I love these boots but they are on their last legs which is why I'm glad I bought a second pair about six months after buying the first pair, and that was over ten years ago and these have well over 100,000 miles on them. One note on the Warm & Safe undershirt... wear another tight shirt over it to help keep the heated shirt closer to your skin. I wore a regular long sleeve shirt over the top of mine and probably should have worn my LDC undershirt as it tends to have more compression. Review: I really like the undershirt compared to my Gerbing jacket as the heat is more even and I don't get any hot spots like I do on the jacket when I crank it up. I also like my Warm&Safe wireless controller for the fact that I just have the controller velcroed to the top of my Farkle Shelf, but it is hard to get it dialed in just right when wearing heavy gloves on the small knob. I spent a lot of time turning it up, turning it down, turning it up, turning it down. I will say though, that when it's cranked up all the way it will be HOT and the heat will be even - chest, belly, back, arms.

I am not sponsored by anyone so the links above are because I sometimes get asked a lot of questions about what I use or where I got it, but I'm happy to answer any questions about what I like or don't like. I have over 100,000 miles of experience with much of the stuff I use.

Now to plan my sleep schedule. Prior to a certified ride I try to get plenty of sleep, so Wednesday night I stayed up late and got up early on Thursday so that I could go to bed early Thursday (6 pm) for a 3 am wake-up. So roughly 5 hours on Wednesday night with a planned 8-9 hours for Thursday. You know what they say about the best laid plans, right? Yep. As things turned out I did get my 5.5 hours on Wednesday, but I didn't get to sleep until about 8 pm on Thursday. Then Brenda got up to do something, then she rustled around for something on the night stand, then something on the dresser, then sat back down on the bed, then got up again, then sat back down and got into bed and laid on her back. What happens when she sleeps on her back? You guessed it, deep, heavy breathing which soon transitions into light snoring which transitions into heavy snoring which transitions into me nudging her and telling her to turn over. Which she did. But the damage was done. It was 11:30 pm when she first woke me and I'd gotten 3.5 hours of sleep. I laid awake until 12:30 at which time I said "screw it, I can sleep on the road if I need to", and I began dressing. Now, if you've ever worn heavy duty motorcycle gear you know it's not quiet to put on or wear, but she just slept through everything until I woke her to say good-bye. Some people! If a mosquito farts in my vicinity it will keep me awake.

I'm dressed, the bike is loaded, and as I back it out of the garage Brenda shows up in her robe to say good-bye, and she watches me ride away.

First stop, the gas station across the street. As I roll in about 0130 I notice a Deputy in the parking lot and he's probably wondering what this bundled up fool on a motorcycle is up to. I was obviously more focused on him then on my own tasks as I got my receipt, checked it for accuracy, wrote my mileage on it, and tucked it away. I failed to take a photo of the receipt next to my odometer. That was not my first fail of the trip, but it also wasn't my last.
SS1K GAS 1 - No odo photo.jpg


Now, start the 24 hour countdown timer (when you are doing cross-country rides through multiple time zones and you're tired, it gets difficult to do the math in your head so this allows me at a glance to see how much time I have left in a certified ride); plug in the gear; reset all parameters on the GPS, look around for anything else I may have missed, and then Off I GO...

I live 3.5 miles from I-10 so in a matter of minutes I'm eastbound and down. Traffic is light, speed limit 75, and the temps are mid-40s. Very nice. As I-10 continues east through Tucson, Benson, and Willcox the elevation continues to rise and the temps continue to drop. I see a low of 28 degrees but fortunately it's been dry lately and there is no ice on the bridges. The undershirt is doing a good job of keeping me comfortable, but my feet are cold (didn't wear my heated socks - another fail), and the outsides of my upper thighs are really feeling the cold. As I move into NM the temps rise to between 32-34 across the entire state. I see 36 degrees near Las Cruces and then 37 as I reach El Paso. I hit the McDonald's at the 375 intersection and go inside to warm up and have breakfast. I get the big breakfast and wolf it down, then rest my head against the side wall and sleep for 15-20 minutes. A 20 minute nap will usually take care of me for about 4 hours, but with the lack of sleep the prior night, who knows? I load back up and hit the road once again. Around noon I stop at a rest area east of Van Horn, pull my bike cover from the saddle bag to use as a pillow, and I climb up on a picnic table for a nap at the Iron Butt Motel. After about 20 minutes of sleep, one of the maintenance men working the rest stop wakes me to tell me that Texas doesn't allow sleeping on the picnic tables or benches, then he looks around, sees that there are no signs posted at the this particular pavilion and says not to worry about it, but if a boss catches me they will tell me to stop. So I gather myself together, look at the sign posted in the next pavilion, tuck that away in the gray matter, and head back to the bike.

Onward!

I reach Junction around 5 pm, gas up, and then head north on the secondary roads as the sun begins to wane. Oh joy. Back roads... night time... Texas... forest rats. My average speed plummets as my paranoia reaches new heights. After counting 12 live deer (how many did I *not* see?), 3 dead deer, and multiple coyote carcasses, I stop counting. There is nothing like a strong sense of self-preservation to keep your tiredness at bay. Whenever possible I tuck in behind a larger vehicle, hoping that if an errant deer wanders onto the highway they will get struck by the vehicle instead of me. I reach Hico just prior to 9:30 pm (8:30 AZ time) so just under 19 hours of travel time to do 1,077 miles or about a 57 mph average. Remember, it's not a race; whether you complete a SaddleSore in 15 hours or 23 hours and 55 minutes, the certificate reads the same so there's no need to speed. It's actually one of the easiest rides to get certified on. I gas up, press the button for the receipt, and... nothing. Typical. The last and most important receipt of the entire trip and no receipt. Oh well, secure my keys and head inside to get a reprint, document my mileage on it, take the appropriate photo, tuck it away, and then head to the hotel which is only 100 yards down the street.

When researching hotels in the area there were some nice ones for well over $100, but no, I have to pop for the cheapie of $51 including tax at the Hico Hills Inn. Big mistake. BIG mistake. BIG. I get the last room and the heater isn't working, but not to worry, they put a space heater in there for me. Yeah, that's what they did. This thing might do a good job of keeping your feet warm under an office desk, but an entire hotel room? I think not. What are my choices? See if there is another hotel nearby with a room no matter the cost? Load the bike back up, find the other place, unload the bike, and hope it's better? Nope. I was cold (freezing) and exhausted so I stayed put. I got undressed but kept on my LDC tights, socks, and a tee-shirt and crawled into bed. Oh, by the way, they had left the main heater running but all it had been doing was blowing cold air into the room. They hadn't even turned the space heater on to give me a warm room when I got there. So I'm bundled up, laying in bed and shivering. I can't stop with the chills and I remember back to a few months ago when Brenda developed pneumonia overnight and woke at 4 am with a fever and chills and shivering, and I begin to wonder if I picked up something during the ride. So I drag myself out of bed and get into the shower which although it looks terrible, delivers GREAT water pressure and lots of water as hot as I can stand. I start out with warm, then hotter, then hot. My outer thighs and butt area are very, very cold to the touch (remember, it's been 36-46 degrees almost the entire ride) and it takes a long time to get them to feel warm to the touch. Eventually the shivering stops, the space heater has taken the chill out of the air and I crash into bed.

I wake at 530 the next morning, a force of habit from working I guess, and since I know that the Koffee Kup opens at 6 am I get dressed and head on over. It's across the street from the gas station, so only about 100 yards away from the Inn. I'm the first one there so I grab a table, order, and pretty soon I get a piping hot breakfast of scrambled eggs, hash browns, bacon, and biscuits/gravy. I couldn't even eat the second biscuit although I'd had nothing to eat since breakfast the prior day. I take the mandatory photos, and then head back to the hotel to sleep another couple of hours, then up to pack and head over for the Pie Run.
KK 1.jpg


Yes, even at 6 in the morning they already had the sign up. What drew my attention to it? Why it was the rooster across the street behind the sign letting the world know that it was time to get up.
KK 2.jpg


My tasty breakfast. Five stars.
KK 4.jpg


I review more of my room and really notice the cracks in the shower walls, the crud on top of the microwave, the fact that they provide a coffee maker and coffee, but no cups. Notice that the big heater is unplugged. It wouldn't turn off so that was the only way I could stop the cold air. And notice the "huge" space heater they gave me.
Hico 1.jpg


Here are some of the cracks in the shower wall.
Hico shower 1.jpg


And the top of the microwave. Apparently, cleanliness is something foreign to the housekeepers here.
Hico 2.jpg


Now, if you think I learned my lesson by staying at a cheap place, think again. I've got another story to tell you about a place on the way home.


The bike is loaded and I'm ready to head over to the Koffee Kup to meet everyone so I do my pre-flight inspection and whoa! My front tire is toast. A very small slit is visible in part of the center section of the tread. Rideable? Yes, But for how long and how far? Certainly not long enough to get me home. So I get to the restaurant and immediately start making phone calls. NOBODY has a Goldwing front tire in stock within the 50-100 mile radius I was calling, not even a Honda dealer. A Honda dealer! No Goldwing front tire in stock at a Honda dealer??? But then... an independent Harley shop tells me he has one but can't install it because he has to leave for a prior engagement. I call back to Heartbeat Racing in Granbury and tell them to order me one. I feel I can ride that far without a problem and I'll just have to wait in a hotel until TUESDAY before I can get back on the road.

Now, here is where the heroes mentioned above come into play. Drew has been working the crowd inside the restaurant and found Jasen who knows OldTLSDoug who is at his home with his big shop and he's willing to mount the tire for me. (me = no tools and no skills) Bob is willing to forego eating his tasty lunch and drive me to Stephenville to pick up the one existing tire in Central Texas, bring it and me back to Hico, and then bring it to Doug's place. I call back to the independent (Streamline Cycles 254-965-1903 if any of you HD guys in the area want to throw him some business) and he agrees to wait until 11:45 for me to get there. I touch base with Bob, we jump in his Jeep and off to Stephenville we go. Streamline makes me a smoking deal on this new Michelin and back to Hico we go. We reconnect with Jesse and then he leads us at 50 mph all the way to Doug's place. Wow, what a place. I'd love to have a garage like that.

Introductions all around (and I write down names for later) and then they all jump on my bike like a NASCAR pit crew, and in about an hour I was out the door and heading home.

I cannot, CANNOT, CAN NOT thank enough all of those involved for everything they did to help me out.

If not for everyone mentioned (and possibly some I missed) I would have been stuck in Texas until Tuesday afternoon which wouldn't put me home until late Wednesday morning, with a medical procedure on Thursday that I would have needed to prep for on Wednesday and may have had to cancel if I couldn't do the prep (yes, a colonoscopy). So not only did they all save me from multiple days of hotel bills and meals, they saved me from having to reschedule a procedure that I couldn't reschedule because I wouldn't have had the insurance (remember, I just retired and my coverage ends 02/02/2020).

So without further ado... may I introduce to you the saviors of my trip. From left to right: Mitch, Jim, Jesse, Chris, and the man, the myth, the legend, Doug. Guys, thank you so much! Not knowing that they would all be there, I did bring a piece of apple pie for Doug. In all the rushing about, I never got a chance to stop and eat myself. So 2,000+ miles and no pie. :doh:
Tire changers.jpg



Next up: the return trip.
 
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Texas T

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The Return Trip

As soon as the guys finished working on the bike, thank you's were made, hands were shook, and I headed out. Originally I was going to leave Hico and go north to I-20 to Van Horn, but now from Doug's place it was a coin toss as to whether I-10 or I-20 would be quicker/faster. I chose south to I-10, and I chose poorly. My GPS plotted a route to the SW to finally intersect I-10 which put me in the middle of deer country for hundreds of miles. If I had just gone north to I-20 I would have saved myself a lot of anguish. But I didn't... :argh:

I got to see a lot of countryside, small towns, ranches, farms, etc which I love to do when out for leisurely ride, but I should have just gone straight south to intersect I-10 even though it would have put more mile on the trip. It would have kept me off the secondary roads with all the deer. Yes, there are still plenty of deer on the interstate, but I have more opportunity to light up the world in front of me then when I'm on a secondary and have to cut my lights every time there's oncoming traffic. The map belows shows the SW route I wound up taking.
Jan 2020 TWT Pie Run to Hico - Edited.png


From San Angelo to Barnhart I followed an F250 4x4 who was making good time. I shut down everything other than my low beams (which are still pretty bright) and I aimed them to the lowest setting, and I tucked in behind him a few car lengths back. He stopped at a gas station at the intersection with 163 in Barnhart and I pulled in next to him to say Thank You. He fully understood why I was tailing him for the entire trip, but I wanted to explain why in case he didn't know. From Barnhart I went due south to Ozona and again I was fortunate enough to pick up a rabbit for me to follow. They kept a pretty good pace other than each time they would spot a deer on the side of the road and they would quickly slow, but then would pick up the pace again. I had to stop about 25 miles outside of Ozona to off-load some fluids so I lost my leader, but when I was mobile again I just kicked up all the lights which gives me several seconds of warning if there is something on / next to the road. I saw several deer on the way in, but nothing real close that would pose a threat.

I fueled at Ozona, texted the next cheapie hotel to let them know I would be a late arrival and not the original 6-8 pm arrival time I had given them when I booked the reservation.

So now it was just ride and fuel, ride and fuel. Yes, there were deer. Lots of deer. There was one very large buck spread across the entire lane of an exit ramp. If I had tried getting off there and hit him, that would have been the end of things. I tried hooking up with a truck with Calif plates; I rode to the front of his fender and kicked on all my lights and rode side by side with him, but apparently he didn't like that and backed off. That was a shame. Between his lights and mine we could have lit up half of west Texas. So wherever possible I just rode reasonably close behind other vehicles. I don't like riding behind semi trucks because of the turbulence, and I won't ride behind them in the next lane because of my lights in their mirrors. When I am on the Interstate I don't have a problem with riding with my high beams on, because the opposing traffic is 50 yards away to the side. It's not as if I was riding straight at you with my lights on. When there is no opposing traffic on the east bound side I'd kick on the Rigid LEDs which helps quite a bit to fill in the shadows.

I finally reach the cheapie Taylor Motel (motel, not hotel) and am greeted by the friendly guy that had taken my reservation a few days earlier. A payment of $53.11 on the credit card later, and he gives me my room key and points to where it is. I have a carport to park in! Just for me! This is an honest to goodness Motor Lodge type place from the 50s. This place is fantastic. Although the reviews were good I really wasn't expecting a lot, especially after my experience in Hico, but this place amazed me. Definitely Five Stars.
1. Friendly service
2. The heat was already on when I got into the room
3. Carport parking
4. Good, clean carpet and flooring
5. Everything had been updated; fixtures, wall coverings, everything
6. The shower was pretty tight, but the shower room included a heated fan in the ceiling for when you got out
7. Towels were big and plentiful
8. Bed was big and comfortable with lots of blankets
9. Flat screen TV
And on, and on, and on. If I'm going through Van Horn in the future and it's even close to being time to stop for the night, I'm going to see if they have a room available. The owners of the Hico Hills Inn need to visit this place and understand what a good, cheap hotel needs to be run like.

Parking
Taylor 5.jpg


The area is small, but the bed is large and comfortable
Taylor 1.jpg


The sink area
Taylor 3.jpg


Shower / toilet area
Taylor 4.jpg


The area opposite the bed. Good WiFi too. The bag on the little dresser came out of my Pakit Rak. I just unzip the Pakit, pull out my bag, and then I can leave the main bag on the bike and I don't have to worry about unlocking it, sliding out the locking bar, removing the bag, replacing the bar, and relocking the bar. Much simpler.
Taylor 2.jpg


And all of that for the princely sum of:
Taylor 6.jpg


I was supposed to have lunch with friends in Tucson on the way home, but I was so tired at that point I left them a message that I was just going to sleep until "whenever" and then hit the road, so for them not to count on me. As luck would have it (depending upon how you look at things) I woke up at 0430. I felt okay, so I got dressed, posted a note that I was leaving, loaded the bike, headed for the closest gas station, and then hit the road. I knew that the deer would be far less active at that point and that the sun would be above the horizon within two hours.

From that point on it was pretty clear (and cold) sailing. Temps were once again down in the 36 range, maybe 34 once in a while, but I just kept the heat cranked up and motored on. The glow on the horizon in my mirrors strengthened, and soon enough I was shifting my position to avoid the sun in my eyes from the mirrors. As I rolled into El Paso my GPS kept bugging me to take the 375 bypass to the north of the city. It was Sunday morning and traffic would be extremely light on I-10 if I continued west and there wouldn't be any construction, but I was ahead of schedule and had nothing to lose so off to the right I went. The bypass takes you north and then west next to Fort Bliss. I stopped at a McDonald's for something to eat and some hot chocolate, and then continued onto the Transmountain Hwy until you reach I-10. The speed limit on the Transmountain is only 55 but I was tailing a Challenger that was running 75-80 through the mountain curves. It was short, but fun. It hit I-10 at the same intersection where I stopped at McDonald's on my way east the day prior.

The loop is one mile further than if you just stay on I-10 through El Paso, but if you are coming through when they are working on I-10 (aren't they ALWAYS working on I-10?) or if during commute hours, then I would highly recommend the bypass.

I arrived in Tucson about 1:30 and had lunch with Dave Brooks, one of the co-founding brothers of the Tour Of Honor, and with fellow TOH rider Dorsey Price who is about 75 or so and "rides" a Polaris Slingshot since he can't hold up a bike any longer. His wife Ann was with him, and at 82 years of age she has no problem getting in and out of that thing either. Dorsey is the real deal, a Vietnam War F-4 jockey with 700+ missions under his belt. (salute)

After lunch it was a quick fill-up, jump back on I-10 a hundred yards away and blast home for the final stretch. It's funny to note that traffic flows faster in that Tucson - Phoenix corridor than it does on the 80 mph section in Texas. 54 minutes after gassing up in Tucson I was gassing up for my final receipt across the street from my house. Google maps shows it to be 85.6 miles from gas station to gas station.

GPS at the end of my ride to Hico
SS1K GPS End - 1.jpg


Second page of the GPS
SS1K GPS end - 2.jpg


End of the trip GPS
IMG_20200126_175624.jpg


End of the trip GPS page 2
IMG_20200126_175612.jpg


Lessons learned:
1. If you "think" you have enough tire left, you don't. Put a new one on.
2. If you "think" your gear is good enough for the weather, put more on. I should have put on the heated socks. I didn't have to turn them on if they weren't needed, but to need them and not have them was painful.
3. Even if you use a packing list, sometimes you forget to put things on the list. I took my toothbrush, but not my toothpaste.
4. Carry Tums or some sort of stomach relief. The combination of 5 Hour Energy and no food took its toll on me.
5. Stay hydrated. This was my first long trip with the MotoJug. Because I wasn't "thirsty" I had to force myself to drink and this is the first time in a long while that I've gotten to a destination, went to bed, and did NOT have muscle cramps. The key is to drink in moderation. Just a few sips a few times an hour. If you gulp it down the body tends to send the overflow straight to the kidneys and then out, and you'll have to make more stops.
6. West Texas is great for impromptu bathroom breaks. Just find an exit that leads to someone's ranch 30 miles away, stop on the on-ramp leading back on to I-10, and have at it.

And last but not least, you never know who your friends are. The group at Doug's place treated me like I was a long lost buddy and helped me out in a time of need. I know that motorcyclists are a tight knit community to begin with, but it is experiences like Saturday that tend to reinforce that brotherhood. When you see a bike on the side of the road; whether it be a touring bike rider, ADV bike rider, or a bad boy patched Harley rider... stop and see if they need a hand. I've done that numerous times in the past and the Karma paid off for me this past weekend.

Ride well and be safe.
 
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mitchntx

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Piece of cake ... I had replaced the front tire on my Goldwing a few months earlier, so I had the "shortcuts" already figured out.

I would, however, suggest you nut and bolt that front end. I'm almost certain we torqued everything and did it in the proper sequence.
However, it's better to be 100% sure.
 
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Like you I tend to cheap out on motel rooms. I love finding places like the Taylor Inn, but I've hit a few dives along the way.

I lived in El Paso in the early 70s, and Trans Mountain Road was a playground for drivers. Don't know how it is now, but back then there was absolutely nothing from NE El Paso to NW El Paso. No businesses, no structures, no roads, no traffic, no cops. It was a fun place to take a peppy little 4-banger 4-speed for a fast romp. It was also where I learned to drive a clutch. My dad took me out there in a 1968 Simca 1000 and made me stop-go-stop-go, with lots of stalls. By the time I got to the top of the mountain, I pretty much had the hang of it.

Sounds like quite an adventure. Glad you're home safely.
 

OldTLSDoug

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Brian, we had a great time playing with your wing. Nice to help a good guy out. We all have been there. I love working with Jim and Mitch, they get stuff done and don't mess around. Glad to see another happy customer at Pee Paw's Scooter Shop. Only unhappy person was the guy that rolled up without an invite that I sent on his way. Glad you made it home safe. The pie was pretty good too.
 

Texas T

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Only unhappy person was the guy that rolled up without an invite that I sent on his way.

Ha ha ha... I wish I had recorded that!

The sarcasm was just dripping when Doug said "I guess you didn't see the No Trespassing sign, huh"? "Get off my property!" :pound:
 

gixxerjasen

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Being a hero is all about perception. I sent a few text messages and let some folks follow me to a place I was already going. I also didn't get in the way of the pit crew, which probably was the real hero thing to do I suppose. The only difficulty for me was keeping Mrs FJR contained to the speed limit specified by Texas_T. She wasn't happy with me holding her back like that.

That said, I love it when a plan comes together. It certainly was a lot of luck in the timing of it all, and it all just clicked. I'm glad to have played a small part in it to get you back going.
 

jhansen

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Did anybody get a picture of the split in the tire tread? I'm interested to see it as I am sure other are. So glad Brian caught it before heading back. That would have not ended well.
 

gixxerjasen

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Did anybody get a picture of the split in the tire tread? I'm interested to see it as I am sure other are. So glad Brian caught it before heading back. That would have not ended well.
Pretty sure Doug could get one.
 

OldTLSDoug

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Did anybody get a picture of the split in the tire tread? I'm interested to see it as I am sure other are. So glad Brian caught it before heading back. That would have not ended well.

I will get one later today. The tire, at it's very best, was toast. It was lumpy and worn. I will hunt up the split and get a picture later today.
 

Texas T

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Did anybody get a picture of the split in the tire tread? I'm interested to see it as I am sure other are. So glad Brian caught it before heading back. That would have not ended well.
I didn't, but it was small, as if someone had sliced it with a razor blade.
 
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Wow! That’s a lot of miles. My butt is sore from just reading this. I don’t know how you LD guys do it. I don’t get sleepy on the bike, but I do get tired and make mistakes.


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Nice that the story had a happy ending! Now, comments on your lessons...

Lessons learned:
1. If you "think" you have enough tire left, you don't. Put a new one on.
2. If you "think" your gear is good enough for the weather, put more on. I should have put on the heated socks. I didn't have to turn them on if they weren't needed, but to need them and not have them was painful.
3. Even if you use a packing list, sometimes you forget to put things on the list. I took my toothbrush, but not my toothpaste.
4. Carry Tums or some sort of stomach relief. The combination of 5 Hour Energy and no food took its toll on me.
5. Stay hydrated. This was my first long trip with the MotoJug. Because I wasn't "thirsty" I had to force myself to drink and this is the first time in a long while that I've gotten to a destination, went to bed, and did NOT have muscle cramps. The key is to drink in moderation. Just a few sips a few times an hour. If you gulp it down the body tends to send the overflow straight to the kidneys and then out, and you'll have to make more stops.
6. West Texas is great for impromptu bathroom breaks. Just find an exit that leads to someone's ranch 30 miles away, stop on the on-ramp leading back on to I-10, and have at it.
1. Yup. Time spent worrying about tread sucks. I have two front tires here at home that are intended to be 'local' tires. If I don't use 'em this year, I'm simply pitching them and moving on...dry-rot is bad, y'know. :rofl:
2. It's so blasted difficult to know what level of gear is sufficient. Worse (for me) is having to suggest things for my wife when we're 2-up. Trying to figure out how *both* of us is going to be comfortable is double-challenging!
3. The packing list is also a checklist. New ride, new list printed for review and checkoff.
4. This happens to my wife more than me, so yeah, one bottle at all times on the bike.
5. I've enjoyed both ends of this problem, and have blog entries that describe that misery in detail. :brainsnap Well, okay, not *that* much detail!
6. There's certainly others here in the west...but a single three minute stop like that is better than an hour of misery. :lol:
 
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What an effort. :thumb:
Glad you made it back safely. It is of little surprise the amount of help you received. There are lots of great folks here with skills and capabilities that are always willing to help.
 

Texas T

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It is of little surprise the amount of help you received. There are lots of great folks here with skills and capabilities that are always willing to help.
That's true. I just didn't want to be "that guy" that impacted everyone else's planned good time because of my poor judgment. :oops:

My Wally World discount goes away for good next week, so last night I ordered THREE new Avon front tires from our website. That should get me through the next 18 - 24 months or so.

I have to replace the Darkside tire as well, but since I have Discount Tire do the mounting I'll buy the tire through them as well. They have a good price match policy and they will match WM's price. It would still be another $15 cheaper to buy through WM with my discount, but I've been dealing with Discount Tire since 1978 and I'm a "happy customer".
 

Splash

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Dang Brian, here I sit with a new unmounted tire and 1 mounted. Heck you could have just picked a lightly used 2004 wing with around 36k and rode it home.
 

gixxerjasen

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That's true. I just didn't want to be "that guy" that impacted everyone else's planned good time because of my poor judgment. :oops:
I'd say zero impact. Maybe even positive impact. Bob got to drive his four wheels around. Chris and I were already going to Doug's. I'm sure you made Doug's day a little better, I'm pretty sure you caught his squeal of glee as he ran to bring out his special tools. Mitch and Jim were giggling at getting to tear apart your bike. So in the end, it was all good.
 
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