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This section is wierd

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May 18, 2006
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Laredo, TX
I mean, really, mixing Vintage & Classics with all project bikes gets a little diverse.

I keep thinking as I read some of these threads like the puke green concourse "what is THIS thread doing in the CLASSICS section?" Then I remember...

I vote for creation of a new, separate, section for projects.

(I like projects, and I like classics, but they shouldn't be thrown in together)
 

WoodButcher

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Austin, TX
This isn't a high traffic sub-forum. I suspect until it gets busy in here that they will stay lumped together, but I'll point your request out to Tourmeister and see what he thinks.
 
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Projects are significant upgrades, rebuilds, total make-overs, custom builds, barn finds, refurbs, overhauls, restorations, etc.

"Vintage" and "Classics" tend to get a wide variety of definitions; they are basically either bikes 25 years old or older, and/or certain widely accepted and readily recognizable bikes that made an impact worldwide.

Since I've had British, Japanese, Italian, German, Spanish and American bikes, choppers, dirt bikes, sport bikes, cruisers and "standards", I'm not one who discriminates, and NEVER trash brands or styles.

"Live and let live"
 

SL350

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I love the old stuff but I think we are the minority. One out of 100 maybe. There are a lot of people that own the old stuff but not many that ride them. The good news is that if they ride them, usually they know how to fix them and are great sources for fixing them.
 
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I keep seeing old Honda Dreams for sale. If I ever get some spare cash together...

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I love the old stuff but I think we are the minority. One out of 100 maybe. There are a lot of people that own the old stuff but not many that ride them. The good news is that if they ride them, usually they know how to fix them and are great sources for fixing them.
Old stuff to me is the good stuff. Cannot wait to get garage space for winter time rebuild time. Give me a GPZ or RD or CB and I am a happy camper.:rider:
 
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I know it sounds trendy, but I've been wanting to do a cafe project for a while now. Have some cool ideas floating around.
 

SL350

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I see a lot of interest on the internet but when I ride it seems I am a lone wolf.

It does draw attention if that is what you want. We can't stop anywhere without someone walking up and asking about my old rides. I have learned to differentiate between them and the panhandlers although their gait is similar.

When one of the new young TWTer's showed up and was looking for a motorcycle for cheap to start, I kind of bit my lip so as not to influence him towards the old stuff. Let's face it, the new models are much safer if you can lay off the throttle. The brakes are better but the suspension advances are incredible. Still part of me wanted to tell him to get an old CB350. Or maybe an SR500. Heck the ct90 is what I ride most....
 
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I see a lot of interest on the internet but when I ride it seems I am a lone wolf.

It does draw attention if that is what you want. We can't stop anywhere without someone walking up and asking about my old rides. I have learned to differentiate between them and the panhandlers although their gate is similar.

When one of the new young TWTer's showed up and was looking for a motorcycle for cheap to start, I kind of bit my lip so as not to influence him towards the old stuff. Let's face it, the new models are much safer if you can lay off the throttle. The brakes are better but the suspension advances are incredible. Still part of me wanted to tell him to get an old CB350. Or maybe an SR500. Heck the ct90 is what I ride most....
The small displacement bikes are the funnest in town. Light weight and easy to handle.
 
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Dec 14, 2012
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San Antonio, TEXAS
The only thing other than spare cash, but one day that will change, is not knowing how to work on or rebuild carbs and I guess brakes too. I want to learn those two things before I get into any "classic" bike. I will probably just have to try and learn (trial/error) and ask a lot of questions, but I am still a few years away from an empty nest and room in my garage. One day though! For now my little TU is my modern classic!
 

Tourmeister

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A couple things,

First, it is a relatively low traffic part of the site. But that isn't really a big deal per se.

Second, and more important, is people trying to figure out which subforum to post in if they can't decide if they have a vintage, classic, or project bike. Often a singe bike fits every category. In general, the idea behind this forum was a place for things like restorations, rebuilds, etc,... basically older bikes. It is not just about upgrading a newer bike with farkles and such. Multiple forums means more moderation work in trying to decide what goes where if the users can't figure it out. A single forum just makes it easier from an administrative and even user perspective.
 
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I completely understand.

My comment was only related to the fact that on this forum you can see 60s classics, and modern 200MPH crotch rockets in the same section.
 

DaveC

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The only thing other than spare cash, but one day that will change, is not knowing how to work on or rebuild carbs and I guess brakes too. I want to learn those two things before I get into any "classic" bike. I will probably just have to try and learn (trial/error) and ask a lot of questions, but I am still a few years away from an empty nest and room in my garage. One day though! For now my little TU is my modern classic!
Find another TU that has crash damage, first crash usually make newbies sell. You now have a project in which to learn your skill set on.
I was trying to start piddling with the Chinese scooters but found them to be real wonky when it came to sourcing parts. In other words you need a large space in which to store the variations. Not the case with the majors, the source of parts remains constant, your parts bin need not expand exponentially , well that is if you don't want it to. :lol2: Every one started some where. I broke my share of stuff, but that is part of the education.
 

Tourmeister

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My comment was only related to the fact that on this forum you can see 60s classics, and modern 200MPH crotch rockets in the same section.
True that! But a real 200mph crotch rocket really is a project and not just a bit of normal farkling of a regular bike :eek2:
 

SL350

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Key is to keep them running after they start. Don't roll them back into the garage to sit again. Old iron needs to be used. Or, at least started and getting warm oil flowing again.

There is a sorting out period with old bikes and once you get past that, they can be pretty reliable. Both the Sl350 and ct90 that I ride often are capable of going farther than I can during any given period.
 
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Key is to keep them running after they start. Don't roll them back into the garage to sit again. Old iron needs to be used. Or, at least started and getting warm oil flowing again.

There is a sorting out period with old bikes and once you get past that, they can be pretty reliable. Both the Sl350 and ct90 that I ride often are capable of going farther than I can during any given period.
At one time a 350 was considered a fairly large bike. I have ridden all over central Texas before on a 400 and 200 Honda. KP
 
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Yep, with modern fuels, it's a constant battle to keep the carbs from gumming up. You almost want Sta-Bil even if you ride the bike every weekend.
 
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Apr 10, 2009
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Welcome, TX
GP, you are right about that. Check out my thread on my beater KLR in the want ad section-I posted a couple of pictures of the carb internals from a bike that had been sitting for about a year, according to the PO. Probably exacerbated by the drippy petcock that allowed fresh gas into the float bowl as the old gas turned to varnish.
 
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Palestine, Texas
I may be a little wierd. Like SL350 said we (I don't know if I qualify to be a "restorer") but we are one percenters. I think everyone should like old bikes and ride them far and fast and often but the reality is we restore old bikes because we don't mind working on them and we are more comfortable riding them because we think we can fix them if they break down. Some people just aren't into working on their own bike whether it be old or new but they appreciate seeing an old one that has been resurrected. I am glad there are people patching up Busas and learning to work on them. They may be our future "restorers". :clap:
 
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For many of us, growing up with these bikes that are now old, they are just funner to ride, they have soul and character that todays modern bikes just don't have, having to do a little work on em gives us a connection with the bike, I love bikes that take some fiddling to get started, most older bikes are slower and the motors make all kinds of rattles and pings depending on the weather and temps, maybe it's a faze I'm going through these days but that's what turns me on, I am a 1%er.
 
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I may be a little wierd. Like SL350 said we (I don't know if I qualify to be a "restorer") but we are one percenters. I think everyone should like old bikes and ride them far and fast and often but the reality is we restore old bikes because we don't mind working on them and we are more comfortable riding them because we think we can fix them if they break down. Some people just aren't into working on their own bike whether it be old or new but they appreciate seeing an old one that has been resurrected. I am glad there are people patching up Busas and learning to work on them. They may be our future "restorers". :clap:
This. I am in the non-mechanically inclined group who wouldn't know the first thing about a restoration but sure does appreciate one that's been taken care of, and appreciates even more one that's still being ridden. :rider:
 
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This. I am in the non-mechanically inclined group who wouldn't know the first thing about a restoration but sure does appreciate one that's been taken care of, and appreciates even more one that's still being ridden. :rider:
+2, though I am myself mechanically competent, I have no inclination toward the work itself. I love talking good restos at bike shows and whatnot.

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SL350

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You young guys may change your minds when you get a bit older, have kids grow up and leave the house, and really miss the old Bandit or Connie. Next thing you know, someone will have one and offer it for $50. I can't emphasize enough the value of hobbies once you get along but not too far along.
 
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You young guys may change your minds when you get a bit older, have kids grow up and leave the house, and really miss the old Bandit or Connie. Next thing you know, someone will have one and offer it for $50. I can't emphasize enough the value of hobbies once you get along but not too far along.
First thing first... Probably a 1988 Cutlass Supreme. Last of the G-bodies. T-tops, v8, bench seats. High school ride. :)

Then the Connie, of course. ;)
 
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