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Tubliss tire system

South Tex

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Anyone try or have any experience with this ? Would it work on a dual sport or would it be impossible to balance for pavement use? Looks interesting and a lot less tubes and tools you would need to carry

c99772ff5dc79234c01774f835235bce.jpg
 

kubotamiketx

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I have them on my Husky 501 and love them. You should invest in some heavy wheel weights to get the wheel assembly somewhat balanced or if I were to do it agai I would drill the new low pressure stem hole 180 degrees from the standard sized high pressure.

Do some you tubes you will see what I mean. But for me they have been flawless and with the lower pressures I can climb like an animal :)
 

ThomasM

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I have them and wholeheartedly endorse them. Only problem is if you don't always do your own maintenance, most techs will whine about it. Worth putting up with that or installing them yourself in my opinion. If you carry an electric pump in your travel kit, be sure it can handle 100psi for the high pressure tube.
 

South Tex

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I’ve been mounting my own tires since cycle gear refused to mount tires on my gsa, then sold me the tools to do it myself. Go figure.

So is the life cycle of the tubliss worth the price (last more than one or two tires) or just the tremendous trail side convenience?
 
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If it lasts longer than tubes, and you can just stick a plug in the tire, I'd say its worth a try.

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kubotamiketx

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I forgot to ask and you didn't say what bike are you wanting to try this with? These are not for adventure bike sized tires, they are more for dual sport sized tires. They cant handle the extreme widths and balancing becomes too much of a problem with the higher speeds.

On my twin i used a product called Outex that has worked perfect! This seems to be a good example of the install process. Have had it for two years now without any problems at all.

https://thetenerist.wordpress.com/2018/01/01/honda-africa-twin-outex-install/
 

South Tex

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Correct ASPR, gsa has spokes but still tubeless. I’m thinking of trying it on the Xr650l since that bike will see the toughest rides I do.
 

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What happens if you pop the tube inside the tire? While riding this past week in Arkansas with a guy that has a Ducati Scrambler, he picked up a nail that went through the tire and I think also popped/tore the deal inside that sealed the spokes. With no way to seal it, he ended up riding the bike on the flat tire for almost 40 miles! Fortunately, the tire had real stiff side walls and he was able to run about 35-40 mph once he got to pavement and it did not shred the tire or trash his rim. He's now wondering how he might prevent a similar problem in the future. I was thinking the same thing about the Tubliss system though...
 

kubotamiketx

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Scott, Scott, Scott, you are such a positive guy, why focus on the negative :)

Yea, if you lose the high pressure tube in the middle it is just like ridding on a flat with half a rim lock. If the tire is stiff enough you can do several hundred miles on a flat. I have hundreds of desert racing miles with flat fronts or rears.

I used to carry a spare tube just case, but with the smaller bikes we never seem to be more than 60 miles from someplace, so I typically don't bother anymore. I do stock spare high pressure tubes in the trailer, just like I typically have spare tires.

Hey what did you find about the oil leak on your orange machine?
 

Jarrett

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What happens if you pop the tube inside the tire? While riding this past week in Arkansas with a guy that has a Ducati Scrambler, he picked up a nail that went through the tire and I think also popped/tore the deal inside that sealed the spokes. With no way to seal it, he ended up riding the bike on the flat tire for almost 40 miles! Fortunately, the tire had real stiff side walls and he was able to run about 35-40 mph once he got to pavement and it did not shred the tire or trash his rim. He's now wondering how he might prevent a similar problem in the future. I was thinking the same thing about the Tubliss system though...
His experience made me think I might as well stick with tubes.

If the tubeless system fails, it seems like you have to carry a spare tube just in case anyway.

So not really any different than I do now.
 

Tourmeister

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Scott, Scott, Scott, you are such a positive guy, why focus on the negative :)

Yea, if you lose the high pressure tube in the middle it is just like ridding on a flat with half a rim lock. If the tire is stiff enough you can do several hundred miles on a flat. I have hundreds of desert racing miles with flat fronts or rears.

I used to carry a spare tube just case, but with the smaller bikes we never seem to be more than 60 miles from someplace, so I typically don't bother anymore. I do stock spare high pressure tubes in the trailer, just like I typically have spare tires.
Why not just use those foam core inserts for the 500? I would think that solves all the problems for a lot less than installing the Tubliss? Am I missing something?

Hey what did you find about the oil leak on your orange machine?
I've not had a chance to mess with it. Waiting for my garage renovations to be completed so I have a clean dry place to work on it.
 

Tourmeister

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His experience made me think I might as well stick with tubes.

If the tubeless system fails, it seems like you have to carry a spare tube just in case anyway.

So not really any different than I do now.
I guess if I were racing, where messing with a flat takes critical time, I might be more worried about it. However, in my years of riding dual sports on all manner of terrain, I've never really thought tubes were a serious problem. A repair typically takes all of 15 minutes tops if I am going slow and being careful. Since I don't do open desert racing and typically stick to dirt roads, even thorns have not been a real problem. The only real issue is the space and weight of packing spare tubes, pump, and tools. But even that has not been a problem, even on my KTM 530 EXC, which is not exactly a pack mule like a KLR 650. On a multi-day ride where I might be camping off the bike, I still carry a spare front and two spare rear tubes, as well as patches. If I am riding with someone I know, we might eliminate some stuff just so we are not carrying duplicates of everything.
 

kubotamiketx

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It is the ability to run lower pressures without damage to the rim and no worry about pinch flats at lower pressure that is the benefit. Traction, traction, traction :)

Remember in Ouray, I could cruse up the super steep stuff without breaking traction.
 
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Why not just use those foam core inserts for the 500? I would think that solves all the problems for a lot less than installing the Tubliss? Am I missing something?



I've not had a chance to mess with it. Waiting for my garage renovations to be completed so I have a clean dry place to work on it.
If you are referring to a mousse like Michelin offers, it is not recommended for road use and I doubt it would balance at all

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South Tex

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Hmmm. Lotsa good opinions. I guess for the price I’ll have some time to think about them before the budget would allow anyways.
 

Tourmeister

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If you are referring to a mousse like Michelin offers, it is not recommended for road use and I doubt it would balance at all

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They must work fairly well as they have been used by many of the top Dakar racers :shrug:
 
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They must work fairly well as they have been used by many of the top Dakar racers :shrug:
Yes their great for off road racing applications where flats can cost you the win or cause serious injury. Michelin says they are speed rated up to 86 mph. Must replace every six months. non highway use.
I would think they would be the best option but with tires I want to "air" on the side of caution.

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bwdmax

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I have tubliss on my son’s WR250R. The inner bladder on the front let go recently. It was down to about 75lbs. He tried to air it up to 110lbs. It didn’t make it. I have been curious about the system for sometime, but never spent the money. This bike had it when I bought it at this point I’m not sold. I definitely wouldn’t set off for a long ride without a tube.

Like Mike said I think the selling point is to able to run low air pressure and not get a pinch flat. I generally don’t air down below 15psi even on a dirt bike so this may be why I not sold. I’m going to stick with it on that bike to give it an honest chance.
 

South Tex

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Ha! I’ll just call you to rescue me. I carry all the tools and tubes on the klr and swapped tires with tools on the bike. Just not wanting to duplicate that for the xrl
 
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Ha! I’ll just call you to rescue me. I carry all the tools and tubes on the klr and swapped tires with tools on the bike. Just not wanting to duplicate that for the xrl
Put together a small backpack with said tools you can take with you regardless of bike. That's what I do. I have a carry/tool/lunchbox/work backpack that goes everywhere with me. I need to expand the tools in it, but you get the idea.

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OldTLSDoug

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I mounted a set on my spare DR-Z wheels. You have to do it completely manually and they can be a bit of a booger to mount. I haven't ridden on them yet, need more days off. Hee Hee.
 
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I mounted a set on my spare DR-Z wheels. You have to do it completely manually and they can be a bit of a booger to mount. I haven't ridden on them yet, need more days off. Hee Hee.
It's funny you posting in a thread talking about the merits of systems to deal with flat tires, and there's your avatar right there. :rofl:
 

OldTLSDoug

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Remember I flattened Chris' tire, not my own. Then, of course, I fixed it too. I need to go ride my S in the dirt with the new knobbies and the Tubliss system. But with the rain lately, there isn't much hope. I need to go play trials bike too. So, today, I guess I will be working on the kickstand to see if I can make it a little more stable. We shall see.
 
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I've run them on the 530 and 300 for years. But only in rear tires. Like KubotaMike said, it's really a low pressure/traction/off-road thing. There is some flat protection but only so much. I've seen a couple of them flat...one several years ago coming over Imogene pass and another near the summit of Cannibal Plateau - this one was a pinched bead on a guy's new D606 tire under seriously rugged conditions. Both were rear tires (of course :doh:). Folks run them on the front but I'm not sure why. Tubes will get you 12-15 psi without much drama. Tubliss instruction call for adding a hefty dose of sealant in the tire and around the bead. If you put that much pooky in a front tube it seems to hold up pretty good too. And really, changing out a front along the trail is not that much heartburn. Besides, it makes for a nice rest break and gives the crew a chance to offer unsolicited wisdom on topics ranging from tube thickness to jock straps.

Moosse inserts have their place too. Just not on pavement or in heavier motorcycles. Heat and friction are not their friends and they'll fall apart real quick like when dealing with it. But, when a racer already has four hundred happy bucks spent in lining up, the cost of inserts seems pretty tolerable as compared to flatting before the first test section. YMMV...
 

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Spare tubes for if I feel ambitious, giant zipties for if I don't. :thumb:
:tab I have yet to see this work when attempted. Maybe the zip ties were not strong enough, but they were between almost every set of spokes all the way around the tire. They barely lasted 1/4 mile on a nice smooth dirt road on a 650 sized bike!

:tab The other thing I have heard repeatedly over the years is folks that carry just a front tube because "the 21" front will work in the 18-19" rear." I have seen that attempted on multiple occasions as well and have yet to see it actually work. In EVERY case I have seen, the tube has failed or completely come apart in a very short time. On one occasion in particular, this caused an entire day of riding to be wasted for the whole group because of the time spent dealing with the flat. This is why I carry both a front and rear spare.

:tab I am NOT saying that either of these options will never work. I am just saying that I would not feel comfortable having those as my back up plan... :whatever:
 

Jarrett

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:tab I have yet to see this work when attempted. Maybe the zip ties were not strong enough

just a front tube because "the 21" front will work in the 18-19" rear." I have seen that attempted on multiple occasions as well and have yet to see it actually work. In EVERY case I have seen, the tube has failed or completely come apart in a very short time.
Good to know. I'll just keep carrying what I've got.
 

Tourmeister

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Good to know. I'll just keep carrying what I've got.
The weight and bulk of a single rear tube (or two as I often carry) is not enough that I think it worth risking not carrying one for a typical dual sport ride. My riding opportunities are limited nowadays and I want to be able to make the most of them, which means not wasting an entire day jacking with a flat tire. I have even had occasion to give up one of my rear tubes to save a group ride in NASTY weather because one of the other riders was not well prepared. We were exposed and the lightning was starting to get CLOSE.

Racing is obviously a different scenario. The same might be true for rides where you stay in a particular area and getting back to your truck/camp is not going to be a big issue.
 

Tourmeister

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On the topic. What do yall carry as an inflation source?

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I have a small Slime brand electric pump. I also carry CO2 cartridges, just in case. These will add a good bit of pressure to a tire in a hurry if needed. The pump can take a while...

I carry plugs/strips for the GS (tubeless) and spare tubes/patches for the KTM 530.
 

Tourmeister

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:tab The CO2 is inserted using something similar to this,

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B017KU1DIK/?tag=twowhetex-20

:tab Basically, the valve screws to the top of the CO2 canister, puncturing the seal as you screw it down. Then you screw the valve to the valve stem. Pull the trigger and it dumps the CO2 into the tire. It can get pretty cold and even ice up on a muggy day. Some have foam covers for the canisters. The canister sits in a plastic shell for mine, and when you screw on the valve, it attaches to the shell so the canister is enclosed as it punctures the seal. This way I am not touching the canister. Of course, you can just wear a motorcycle glove and that works fine. You can leave the valve attached to the tire while you swap out a used canister for a full one.

:tab On a street bike, something like a 17" rear can be pressured up to 35 psi or so with 3-4 of the canisters in the size used for most paint ball/BB guns (16g I think?). An 18" rear on my KTM can be pressured up to 15-20 psi with maybe 2-3 canisters. Then I can finish it off with the Slime pump if needed. BMW actually had some bigger canisters, like 20-22g if I recall correctly. It only took 1-2 of those to fill a tire.
 
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South Tex

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Slime pump for me also. Is there any Benefit to the h/d tubes or just more weight? That’s what I have on the klr and for spares
 

Tourmeister

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:tab Some folks carry something like this,

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B079HBQP7Z/?tag=twowhetex-20

:tab I used to ride bicycles. Even on those skinny little bike tires, a pump like that required a LOT of strokes to pressure up those small volume tires. The thought of trying to fill a typical motorcycle tire is NOT appealing! However, you don't have to worry about running out of CO2 canisters or draining the bike battery with an electric pump :shrug: If I am really worried about the drain on my battery from the electric pump, I just start the bike. I've never had a problem with it.
 

Tourmeister

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Slime pump for me also. Is there any Benefit to the h/d tubes or just more weight? That’s what I have on the klr and for spares
:tab My experience is that they are harder to install, are much more bulky and heavy for packing, and yield no discernible increased benefit. In theory, they help protect against pinch flats. That would be an issue of you are running really low pressures, like 15 psi or less. On my KTM, I pretty much NEVER go below 20 psi and most often stay around 25 psi. But, that is for actual dual sport riding where I will be doing a mix of street and dirt. Riders that are more dirt biased, like Mike and RG, will generally favor lower pressures.

:tab I have often seen people try, repeatedly, and fail to patch heavy duty tubes. I have no explanation for why they should be harder to patch than a regular tube, but that is what I have seen personally. Richard "Trail Boss" Gibbens has a theory based on our experiences on a trip to Mexico long ago. But, who knows if he's right ;-)

I carry the small slime pump most of the time, but always carry this manual or CO2 hybrid in the tail bag on my KTM.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B003C2CT7A/?tag=twowhetex-20
:tab The combo is a neat idea. It is only slightly bigger than my CO2 only setup.
 

South Tex

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Well that saves a lot of space. The h/d tubes are very bulky and I heard the same that they not patchable. Back to basics for me.
 

bwdmax

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I install heavy duty tubes at home but carry standard for spares on the bike due to space. I use Bridgestone tubes that are natural rubber and the heavy duty ones will take a patch. I suggest you try to apply a patch at home on your preferred tubes to see if they will stick. You must really scuff up the heavy duty tube for it to stick. I have the scuffer roller that is in this kit and it helps tremendously in applying patches.
https://bestrestproducts.com/shop/cyclepump-ez-gauge/cyclepump-expedition-tire-inflator/cyclepump-tire-repair-kit-tubed/

I got mine at NAPA.
 

Tourmeister

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I install heavy duty tubes at home but carry standard for spares on the bike due to space.
:tab The spare might take up less space, but if you actually use the spare, you still have to pack out the original HD tube, which takes up a lot of space. I used the HD tubes for a while, but like I said, I found no real benefit for general DS riding. I've ridden in Oklahoma, Arkansas, Missouri, Big Bend NP and SP, all over central and East Texas, Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, SW Colorado, Alabama, North Carolina, and Northern Mexico. A LOT of that has been in VERY rocky terrain on loaded down bikes. I've even done rocky and rooted single track riding. I don't think I've ever gotten a single flat on the front from riding, although I've had a few just from tires aging and the valve stem base leaking at the tube. I've had a few rear flats from punctures, but a HD tube would not have prevented any of those. I have NEVER had a pinch flat that was not tire tool induced :-P But again, I think tire pressure has a LOT to do with that. Running really low pressures with a regular tube may lead to pinch flats in cases where an HD tube might prevent one.

:tab For what it is worth, I NEVER use SLIME in any tires :nono: I have used it. It has never worked. It has ALWAYS made a HUGE mess in every single case!! I find it much easier to leave it out and just deal with a flat if I get one. Some folks will swear by it though. I think that might be more like the deer whistle effect though, they've never gotten a flat while using it, so it must work :-P Some folks use Ride-On. That is actually different than SLIME. It may work. I have never tried it.
 

kubotamiketx

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I love the open can of mineral spirits next to the flame!

Man I remember my "Camel" patch kit I used all the time. Remember getting sad when tubes had more than 10 patch's on them, meant we had to go find more soda bottles to return for cash!

Gas was $0.26 cents a gallon too.
 

Jarrett

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I carry this stuff:

https://www.motionpro.com/product/08-0519 - Although using the kickstand now seems easier.

http://www.bajanopinch.com/ - not even sure how you do it without this.

https://www.giantloopmoto.com/product/irc-tubes/ - less space and keeps them from getting damaged while packed.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000ET9SB4/?tag=twowhetex-20

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004QP47NG/?tag=twowhetex-20

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B06XDLC51Z/?tag=twowhetex-20

On the K-Trail, out of three pumps used, that Slime one linked up there was the only one that could get the bead to set on an Africa Twin tire.
 
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