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Unusual/rare motorcycles you'd like to have.

Joined
Jan 24, 2005
Messages
4,944
Location
Azle, TX
Moto Morini Corsaro 1200 Veloce. It's a 1200cc Italian V-twin hooligan rocket and Corsaro means pirate. How freakin' cool is that?


 
Joined
May 13, 2004
Messages
3,960
Location
Leander, Tx
I burn for one of these:



GSF400 Bandit. Made in the early 90's, and while they were available in the states, are uncommon to say the least.


Also, DR800:




Need I explain either?
 
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Joined
Jan 24, 2005
Messages
4,944
Location
Azle, TX
This one fits in the unusual category even though it is still a design experiment.
Lots of interesting stuff going on here. Go check out this website. It's a very interesting approach at a sportbike.
http://www.ecossespirit.com/






I wish them luck, because they build one of my favorite big-inch twin custom bikes. The Ecosse Heretic


 
Joined
Jan 24, 2005
Messages
4,944
Location
Azle, TX
Would you dress like one if you had it?
I'd put a jolly roger on the back of some black leathers and have my helmet airbrushed to look like a skull with an eye patch(using one of those visor screen that they use with helmet skins) and I'd put a pirate hat on it with suction cups. Would that be close enough or would I need a fake parrot stitched to the shoulder.:rofl:
 

scar04

2
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Joined
Feb 18, 2005
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Laredo, TX
I've got a parrot from Margaritaville I got a few years ago you could borrow. We'll just strap it to the handlebars.
 

Tourmeister

Keeper of the Asylum
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Joined
Feb 28, 2003
Messages
45,764
Location
Huntsville
At the last Cycle World show I attended, they had one of the MV Augusta's that was a limited edition in a blue/silver scheme. Price tag was out of this world... Still... if money were no limit... :drool: I cannot find a pic though :doh:
 
Joined
Jan 24, 2005
Messages
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Location
Azle, TX
At the last Cycle World show I attended, they had one of the MV Augusta's that was a limited edition in a blue/silver scheme. Price tag was out of this world... Still... if money were no limit... :drool: I cannot find a pic though :doh:
You mean like this one? :trust:

 

Tourmeister

Keeper of the Asylum
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Joined
Feb 28, 2003
Messages
45,764
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Huntsville
Yes! It looks sooooo much better in person :drool: The blue and silver used are just perfect. The photos just cannot convey the quality of the paint job.

There are other bikes I would like if I were able to collect like Jay Leno... However, like Leno, I would be collecting things like steam engines, old hit and miss engines, etc,... I would have Kevin Cameron and Leno over as often as possible for chat sessions :trust:
 
Joined
Sep 12, 2006
Messages
103
Too much Busa, straight line bike with unusable speed. I'll take the TZ750, thank you very much.:mrgreen:
:rofl:

i know a guy who'll tell you real fast that a TZ750 had a bit of a unusable speed itself.

and while never having ridden one myself, just imagining a 750cc two-stroke makes me wince.
 
Joined
Mar 1, 2003
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13,438
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The end of the road between Sodom and Gomorrah
:rofl:

i know a guy who'll tell you real fast that a TZ750 had a bit of a unusable speed itself.

and while never having ridden one myself, just imagining a 750cc two-stroke makes me wince.
You are quite right that it has too much speed. :lol2: But, since it's a track bike, at least you can TRY to use it legally. The Busa will corner pretty well, not race bike speed, but fine on the highway to be a lot of fun in the twisties. That rocket thing, man, I don't know if I'd wanna fine out. :rofl: Oh, I'd LOVE to have one in a collection if I were rich. That's a rich man's collector, ya know. But, I'm just saying, it's a little outragious to think you could ever use all that safely. I don't even know if I'd wanna try on the track, probably scare the heck outta me, but then, I always figured the TZ750 would scare the heck outta me, too. I just always wanted to see how scared I could get, that's all.:lol2: I don't know if I'd try to ride that turbine thing at other than mundane speeds. I don't really wanna die.:rofl: I raced TZ250s, probably could have afforded a 350, but there were no classes for it in AMA for a novice pro and you were limited in CRRC to F2 and F1 with a 350.

The TZs never topped out at Daytona, the biggest track they ran on. Road America has a long straight, but not the bowl to compare with Daytona. One year in tire testing, there wasn't a hay wall at the chicane and KR ran it around without taking the chicane just to see what he could get the OW31 up to. He broke the speed traps slightly over 200 mph. Normally in a race, they tripped the traps at a little over 180. :doh: They claim it only had 150 horsepower. It sure made the most of every pony it had! It weighed about 330 lbs I think.

I'd just love to have one. Show up at an LSTD track day, can you imagine all the youngsters there going "WHAT'S THAT!?" :rofl: And, the sound of an inline 4 cylinder, oh, LORD, I can still hear those chambers rattling. Just EVIL....

Ah, but it's just a dream. Parts are non-existent and where do you find slicks in 18" anymore. :lol2:
 
Joined
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The end of the road between Sodom and Gomorrah
A guy I knew, David Green, won the novice pro race in Daytona in '81 which automatically moved him to expert and qualified him to ride F1, the TZ750s. Now, David's dad owned Durwood Green contstruction in Houston, did not lack money. The following season he'd acquired a TZ750 and a couple of year old ex 500GP Euro racer, an RG500. (a square four two stroke GP bike like Barry Sheene won two world championships on). He took 'em to TWS and they scared the heck outta him. He couldn't ride 'em, gave up, sold 'em, bought a new 250. :lol2: There was a reason AMA made you advance to expert before you could ride F1. Now, you could ride superbike, no problem, as a novice, but F1 was reserved, at the time, for those who graduated to expert off 250s either by points or winning a race.
 
Joined
Mar 1, 2003
Messages
13,438
Location
The end of the road between Sodom and Gomorrah
That's an RG500 like David had. They're even more rare than the TZ750s that survive. They'd sell anyone in the AMA a 750 who had an expert pro license. The RGs were built specifically for 500GP in Europe and a few were cranked out for privateer teams.

Edit...the RG had a LONG run with many versions and updates over the years. Any one year model is more rare than the TZ750, but I don't know if there might be more survivors if you consider all years. Schwantz won on basically an RG, though the square four format was long gone. So too, KR Jr. That bike, though, looks to me like a late square four. I might be wrong.



barry.jpg


1976, 1977 500cc world champion Barry Sheene
 
Joined
Jan 1, 2004
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6,454
Location
Hippo town
There was a street model RGV500 as well. Sold everywhere but here of course. Those are a little easier to find.
 
Joined
Apr 21, 2004
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2,685
Location
Bryan, TX!!
Y2k is a contender. Also the Tomahawk. Yep. I said it.

How about a bike that weighs 300lbs, has 200hp, and gets 80mpg.
 
Joined
Oct 23, 2006
Messages
1,369
Location
Edmond OK
Jack, what kind of Suzuki race bike is this?
It is on display at the Triumph/Suzuki dealer in OKC.
Gerald has several neat bikes. He's also got restored Gilleria GP 125 with a dustbin fairing among many others. When he moved to the new store, he had many bikes in storage.
 
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Joined
Sep 12, 2006
Messages
103
here's the bike ducati never built, but should have:

SBK (748/916/996) rolling chassis with an air-cooled 2-valve motor. well balanced and FUN, but is it OK to add if i already own it? ;-)
 
Joined
Aug 11, 2003
Messages
5,640
Location
Denver, Colorado
Gerald has several neat bikes. He's also got restored Gilleria GP 125 with a dustbin fairing among many others. When he moved to the new store, he had many bikes in storage.
He does have quite a few more than "several", I am ready for them to get their "Ace Cafe" conversion of the old Nissan service bay they have considered doing so they can show off all of those bikes.
 
Joined
Oct 23, 2006
Messages
1,369
Location
Edmond OK
He does have quite a few more than "several", I am ready for them to get their "Ace Cafe" conversion of the old Nissan service bay they have considered doing so they can show off all of those bikes.
Those bikes in the service bay were what I was talking about. I heard he recently bought out the inventory of an estabished dealership in Tulsa.
 
Joined
Mar 1, 2003
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13,438
Location
The end of the road between Sodom and Gomorrah
There was a street model RGV500 as well. Sold everywhere but here of course. Those are a little easier to find.

The street RGVs are a dime a dozen compared to an RG500 square four. There really weren't that many of the square fours built and there never was a street version to my knowledge, could be wrong, but don't think so. It was a cool engine, twin crank, rotary valve induction with the carbs feeding into the side of the crankcase on either side. Rotary valve induction could be tuned separately ABDC to BBDC and had advantages until case reeds got polymer and carbon reed materials. Other bikes like my TZ250s used piston port induction, but the port opens ABDC at the same degrees of crank rotation that it opens BBDC of course. Metal reeds restricted induction flow and reed valve induction was not in great favor (the TZ750 was an exception) in race bikes until the advent of modern reed materials which came along around the very early 80s in the production bikes (by "production bikes", I mean production race bikes sold to race teams, not street bikes). That's about the same time Suzuki Veed the engine and went with case reed induction.

I think that's a later model square four in that picture just going by the fact it has the later "low boy" frame and the frame is all tube steel. The body work is late model. Can't see the engine, but that's my educated guess.:mrgreen:
 

pacman

Die with memories, not dreams.
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Burleson
I believe the Motoczysz is a twin crank square four design. What a clever approach to packaging problems. I'm sure it prevents it's own set of problems, but it's a neat idea, nonetheless. Who did it first, Ariel?
 
Joined
Mar 1, 2003
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The end of the road between Sodom and Gomorrah
I believe the Motoczysz is a twin crank square four design. What a clever approach to packaging problems. I'm sure it prevents it's own set of problems, but it's a neat idea, nonetheless. Who did it first, Ariel?
I think Ariel, but don't hold me to it. Square fours haven't been all that popular. It really takes water cooling. An air cooled square, the rear cylinders, especially if two stoke, have serious heating issues. The Ariel was a very mildly tuned push rod 4 stroke engine intended for touring smoothness, not performance.
 
Joined
Aug 11, 2003
Messages
5,640
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Denver, Colorado
I think that's a later model square four in that picture just going by the fact it has the later "low boy" frame and the frame is all tube steel. The body work is late model. Can't see the engine, but that's my educated guess.:mrgreen:
Maybe LowRyter could asked Gerald sometime about the history of that race bike in his shop and we could find out what it is.
 

pacman

Die with memories, not dreams.
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From Motorcyclist Online Edition:
"...the machine [the Motoczysz C1 990] is powered by a 1-liter inline-four with staggered cylinder blocks and stacked, contrarotating cranks, the whole thing positioned lengthways in a carbon-fiber chassis....." by Alan Cathcart
Not quite a square four, but something entirely new and different.
 
Joined
Mar 1, 2003
Messages
13,438
Location
The end of the road between Sodom and Gomorrah
Personally, I would probably have to go with the RC45 or NR750 but I am suprised that no one has mentioned anything from Bimota, like this one, the Tesi 3D:

http://www.bimotausa.com/tesi3d_gal.html


I would love to have a chance to ride it.
Exotic, but as I recall, they never made the hub center steering thing work very well. Lots of theoretical advantages, but not much good if you can't make it work in real life.
 
Joined
Mar 2, 2003
Messages
1,156
Location
Austin, TX, USA
Exotic, but as I recall, they never made the hub center steering thing work very well. Lots of theoretical advantages, but not much good if you can't make it work in real life.

I remember the same thing but they seem to be trying again, the 3D is do out later this year. Try, try again I guess is their motto
 
Joined
Jan 24, 2005
Messages
4,944
Location
Azle, TX
Bimotas
SB8K(TL1000R motor):


SB8R(TL1000R motor):
2002sb8rspecial.jpg


SB6(GSXR 1100 motor):


SB6R(GSXR1100 motor):


DB5R(Ducati 1000DS motor):



V-Due(500cc 2-smokin' v-twin):


Vyrus 985 C3 4V(Ducati 999 testastretta motor):
 
Joined
Jun 22, 2005
Messages
2,249
I fell for the Suzuki Nuda the first time I saw it and still think it's one of the all time best looking bikes!
SRAD
 
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