• Welcome to the Two Wheeled Texans community! Feel free to hang out and lurk as long as you like. However, we would like to encourage you to register so that you can join the community and use the numerous features on the site. After registering, don't forget to post up an introduction!

Who gets credit for getting you into motorcycles?

my6

Joined
Jun 1, 2005
Messages
1,341
Location
Houston
Loved his riding scenes in the Great Escape. That peaked my interest I guess, and the rest is history.

Sent from my Nexus 4 using Tapatalk
 
Joined
Apr 15, 2013
Messages
1,256
Location
Elgin
Who got me into bikes? Well, that would be my first EX-wife. After she left I had nothing and bought a 1981 Honda CB900 SS.
467431-870-0.jpg


That bike got me through a ruff patch in life until the day I was hit on it. In some ways I think I was asking for it. I think the throttle only had two positions, wide open or closed:trust:. I think I would like the guys at SteelBent Customs to make me a bike out of one. Kind of like this one.
 
Joined
Nov 25, 2012
Messages
16,874
Location
Lampasas
Who got me into bikes? Well, that would be my first EX-wife. After she left I had nothing and bought a 1981 Honda CB900 SS.
467431-870-0.jpg


That bike got me through a ruff patch in life until the day I was hit on it. In some ways I think I was asking for it. I think the throttle only had two positions, wide open or closed:trust:. I think I would like the guys at SteelBent Customs to make me a bike out of one. Kind of like this one.
Looked at one of those Hondas locally last year,but it was too ruff for the price. More work than this guy had time for.
 

SpiritAtBay

Forum Supporter
Joined
Feb 12, 2013
Messages
3,984
Location
Kerrville
who got me into motorcycles? i guess i get the blame.

i hung around my dad and brother while they rode. my dad always had a street bike or two. when we were little, my bro usually had a dirt bike. they tolerated me watching, but it was a rare day if i got to ride on the back.

years later, as an Air Force wife living overseas, motorcycles were a good way to get around the little island of Okinawa. Hence, my first bike, a 90cc Yamaha enduro.
after about a year, i bumped up to a 250.

returning to the states (early '90's), i put bikes out of my mind, succumbing to the belief that the roads/traffic here were just too dangerous.

Life moved on, I found myself living in Georgia with a great little 45 minute commute thru the countryside on two lane, black top roads. And gas prices were going up and up....the gears in my head got to cranking and soon enough I had taken the MSF course and bought an old beater to cruise those 2 lane roads on.

November 2011 I bought my Wee. A 2009 model, she had 14k easy cruising, highway only miles on her.

This different style bike really opened my eyes to the possibilities of riding. The bike was comfortable, what a new concept to me! Stable and easy to control...not to mention easy power no matter where you were, gear-wise.

Two years later, she is pushing 40k and has never run better, THANKS to very generous friends found here through TWT.

I suppose Dad gets the credit after all. If he didn't ride, I don't think I would have wanted to.
And though he didn't encourage me back then, I know he would be proud to see me ride today.

And, boy, would he get a kick out of today's motorcycles.

Thanks for reading!
 
Joined
Nov 25, 2012
Messages
16,874
Location
Lampasas
who got me into motorcycles? i guess i get the blame.

i hung around my dad and brother while they rode. my dad always had a street bike or two. when we were little, my bro usually had a dirt bike. they tolerated me watching, but it was a rare day if i got to ride on the back.

years later, as an Air Force wife living overseas, motorcycles were a good way to get around the little island of Okinawa. Hence, my first bike, a 90cc Yamaha enduro.
after about a year, i bumped up to a 250.

returning to the states (early '90's), i put bikes out of my mind, succumbing to the belief that the roads/traffic here were just too dangerous.

Life moved on, I found myself living in Georgia with a great little 45 minute commute thru the countryside on two lane, black top roads. And gas prices were going up and up....the gears in my head got to cranking and soon enough I had taken the MSF course and bought an old beater to cruise those 2 lane roads on.

November 2011 I bought my Wee. A 2009 model, she had 14k easy cruising, highway only miles on her.

This different style bike really opened my eyes to the possibilities of riding. The bike was comfortable, what a new concept to me! Stable and easy to control...not to mention easy power no matter where you were, gear-wise.

Two years later, she is pushing 40k and has never run better, THANKS to very generous friends found here through TWT.

I suppose Dad gets the credit after all. If he didn't ride, I don't think I would have wanted to.
And though he didn't encourage me back then, I know he would be proud to see me ride today.

And, boy, would he get a kick out of today's motorcycles.

Thanks for reading!

This is the wonderful stories that help to interest more former riders to get back in the saddle. It seems that there are a bunch of us that rode a lot got away from it to raise kids then dove back into it head first. Once motorcycles get in your blood it is hard to eradicate. KP
 

need2tour

Forum Supporter
Joined
Dec 26, 2013
Messages
344
Location
San Marcos, Tx
In 1978 after getting married I saw a new add for a 400 or 450cc that Kawasaki had just come out with and it had side cases and I wanted it. Could not justify spending $1700 or so as I recall. Then into my 30s. Told the wife that I was going to get a bike. She said "Okay". Ran across an older gentle man who said, "You shouldn't get a bike until you are at least 40 when you get all the wildness out of your system". Urge went away.
Then more than 4 1/2 years ago the program 'A Twist Of The Throttle' finally ignited the pilot light. Again I told my wife I was getting a bike. " Okay" she says. " but you are going to take the rider safety course and wear a helmet." "No problem, dear," I replied.
I wanted to buy a vintage Triumph Bonnieville 750. Needed that vintage Brit as my first bike! Then three years ago last November found my GS on Ebay in N.J., got it shipped in December, and have wished I had started long ago. I really enjoy being part of this great fraternity of motorcycle riders and a member of this forum! :rider:
 
Joined
Nov 25, 2012
Messages
16,874
Location
Lampasas
In 1978 after getting married I saw a new add for a 400 or 450cc that Kawasaki had just come out with and it had side cases and I wanted it. Could not justify spending $1700 or so as I recall. Then into my 30s. Told the wife that I was going to get a bike. She said "Okay". Ran across an older gentle man who said, "You shouldn't get a bike until you are at least 40 when you get all the wildness out of your system". Urge went away.
Then more than 4 1/2 years ago the program 'A Twist Of The Throttle' finally ignited the pilot light. Again I told my wife I was getting a bike. " Okay" she says. " but you are going to take the rider safety course and wear a helmet." "No problem, dear," I replied.
I wanted to buy a vintage Triumph Bonnieville 750. Needed that vintage Brit as my first bike! Then three years ago last November found my GS on Ebay in N.J., got it shipped in December, and have wished I had started long ago. I really enjoy being part of this great fraternity of motorcycle riders and a member of this forum! :rider:
Now you must post a picture of said BMW.:trust:
 
Joined
Feb 1, 2014
Messages
910
Location
Republic of Texas
No idea who it was originally back in the late 60s.
Thinking about going and digging out the 1959 HD 110cc hard tail that I had back then and restoring it. The model name started with a 'C' is all I remember.

What got me started back, was passing a motorcylcle on my way to Henderson.
For some reason I just kept watching him in review mirror. When he turned into a store, don't know what got into me, but turned around just to have a chat.

Conversation then went on to off road riding and he mentioned TAT.
He told me what it was about and that is what did it.

Right when I got back home, looked it up on the internet.
Now I have a 2002 DR650SE that I am getting ready to run the full length of the TAT.

I have some other rides (rock hounding) planned also in Tx that may be of interest to y'all,
plus thinking about posting a treasure hunt that I am sure you will enjoy.
Might make it series type of deal.

Soon as I feel like I have some sort of trust in it mechanically to run with y'all local, I will.
 
Joined
Feb 1, 2014
Messages
910
Location
Republic of Texas
Joined
Jun 13, 2006
Messages
4,965
Location
Lewisville
When I was a wee lad, my mom's baby brother Curt, who's only about 12 years older than me, had a Honda CB750 with a windjammer fairing. He took me for a ride. I was perhaps 7 or 8. This was the 70s... our sculls were harder then so helmets weren't necessary. LOL But I was hooked. I had all kinds of toy motorcycles. Another uncle had a mini bike that I got to ride. That ride lasted about 20 seconds. He told me what the throttle was but nothing else. I ride straight into a picnic table. LOL More years and toys later. I turned 18 and told my mom I wanted a motorcycle. She was nervous but OK with it. That was a long time ago. Still makes her nervous to know I ride almost every day, probably worse because I live in a big city. But I'd credit my Uncle Curt more than anyone.
 

JQ1.0

Forum Supporter
Joined
Feb 15, 2013
Messages
391
Location
Graham, Texas
A friend I met when he and my wife worked together at a parts house here in Graham got us started riding dirt bikes. At the time he had a SL350, and a Kawasaki Centurion and his wife rode a Hodaka Super Rat. He sold me the Kawasaki Centurion and we started riding mostly at Flying P Motorcycle Ranch in Weatherford. My wife would ride with Tee on the 350, 2 up, his wife on the Rat and I would struggle to keep up and upright on the Centurion. Tee was a flat tracker and pretty much an all around outlaw, and he could skin a scooter with the best. Well the Centurion was replaced by two 1972 SL 125's and the 4 of us continued to ride until my first born came when my wife retired to raise 2 boys until they were old enough to stay with Grandma when we could ride. We continued riding and went thru several bikes, DT250, SP370, CX500 XL185 and the boys would go with me when they were big enough to hold on. When the boys were big enough for their own bikes we got them an XR80 and a Z50 and bought the wife an XR200 and I was on an XR500R. We then were hanging out at Red River every chance we got. Later added a KDX80 for the youngest, XR200 for the oldest XR250 for the wife and a KDX200 for me. The riding tapered off as the boys were in high school and then off on their own. I finally sold all the bikes in 2000 and was out of the motorcycle business. The youngest never lost his lust and would always have a new to him bike for me to ride around the block when I would see him. Then my oldest decided he wanted back in and now I could ride around the block when I saw him.

Part 2: March 2012, my youngest called and told me he had seen a really clean TTR250 and was I interested. Well of course I was. I added a DR650 January 2013, and a KDX200 November 2014. My wife doesn't ride anymore but I hook up with my boys ride every chance we get. My grandson rides also and he and I like to 2 up on the 650.

So I have 2 people I credit with getting me started.

My youngest son Justin got me started back riding after a 12 year hiatus.

Tee got me started riding back in 1971. Tee may have coined the term "Hold my beer and watch this". Tee passed away this past September.
 

sKatZ

2
Forum Supporter
Joined
Aug 15, 2008
Messages
2,988
Location
li'l d, TX
My dad always rode. He would buy two of every bike, every time. I started out sitting on the gas tank. Eventually, I rode pillion. He absolutely FORBID me to ride, assuring me I would get killed. My older brothers apparently were more disposable. When I was 10, I went on a summer trip with friends who had a Honda minibike of some sort. With my best friend on the back, I rode about 15 yards - right into the side of a cabin.

Some 37 years later, my dad was long passed away and I realized I didn't have to listen to him anymore. I got a Kymco Super 8 150 (loved it), then an S40 (hated it), then Q and life has been generally quite wonderful since then.
 

TX_northstar

Forum Supporter
Joined
May 9, 2008
Messages
641
Location
Denton County, TX
This (attached) was the reason. Although this guy left my mom, brother and I, this photo burned in a house fire, has been with me for a very long time. I think the urge to ride may be a bit "genetic". As more photos surfaced of him doing things I started on my own in college (hunting, fishing, road trips), I realized I was destined to have his adventurous spirit, but luckily my mothers sense of parenting... Number two was Steve M. in The Great Escape.

For anyone curious about the bike... after much research best guess is a 1964 BSA Hornet, aftermarket head and tail lights as they were not imported with lights.
 

Attachments

Joined
Mar 24, 2015
Messages
295
Location
Stephenville, TX
Definitely my dad.

My dad had dirt bikes growing up, and when I was 6, bought me a brand new PW50 and he bought a TTR225 to follow me around on. He was always tinkering with my bike trying to make it a little faster, lol.
 
Joined
Oct 27, 2014
Messages
31
Location
Brenham, Texas
My older brother is the guilty individual.
I raced BMX in the mid '80s in the N. Houston area and asked my folks for a dirt bike many times and always received the same answer, no. Until my brother got a job at a motorcycle dealership (long gone by now) in a College Station, when a customer brought his 1979 Yamaha DT100 in for repair and never returned to pick it up. My parents finally caved and bought it for me.
I began to mow lawns to feed my new found addiction. After a few months I saved enough to buy a 1980 Yamaha YZ80. I mowed more lawns, sold the bike, combined the money and bought a 1985 YZ80, then a 1984 CR125 and on to a 1983 XR200 then followed by a 1986 YZ125. I rode the YZ for a until I bought my first street bike, a 1989 Suzuki Katana 750. I kept the Katana for quite a few months before going back to the dirt on a 1992 RM250. Anyway, following bikes include a 1993 CR125, a Kawasaki Vulcan 800, 1996 HD Sportster 1200 Custom, 1997 YZF600R, a 2003 Aprilia SL1000R Falco and currently an '01 Kawasaki ZRX1200R. I plan on getting some dirt bikes for the family in the near future and ultimately a KTM RC8R on my bucket list.
 
Joined
May 18, 2005
Messages
589
Location
Plano, TX
My father was my inspiration for riding motorcycles, as he rode when I was young. Here is a pic from 1962 where he took me on his Montesa. I was 3.



Edit: I believe this motorcycle is a 1960 Montesa Brio 125cc, customized a little.
 
Last edited:

h2000fb

Forum Supporter
Joined
Nov 21, 2006
Messages
2,337
Location
Crawford, TX
My fellow 12 year old friend with a Sears minibike and the Sears & Robuck catalog showing all the bikes they had available.
 
Joined
Feb 8, 2015
Messages
953
Location
DFW
Some random dude I watched from the back of the family LTD wagon when I was a kid. It looked like so much fun. I knew I'd do it one day.
 
Joined
Apr 2, 2003
Messages
458
Location
Cedar Park Texas
i had a friend, George Pittman who made his motorcycle out of a 10 speed bicycle and a lawn mower engine with a horizontal out put shaft. His bike used v belts and pullys to make it go. He and I both learned the fine are of brass brazzing or gas welding using clothes hangers for welding rods. He rode that bike everywhere, and as soon as his was running I had to have one too. I chose a old Western Auto Huffy bicycle for mine. I found a horizontal engine and ended up putting the thing together using a torque converter out of a Maytag washing machine as a clutch to get it going. It was not pretty but it ran very good right up to the point where I crashed in a curve on Arroyo Seca here in Austin and tried to knock a fire hydrant over with my unprotected head. The State Trooper whose house was on that corner took me home so my mother could take me to the hospital for stitches to my left eye brow.
A Sears Roebuck moped with shifter on the handlebars and using bicycle style pedals to get it started was my first real motor bike, quickly followed by a 1958 Harley Hummer 125cc two stroke. I rode the wheels off that old faithful motorcycle, and wish I had it back today. I rode Harleys for years and years mostly staying with the Sportster 883cc. When I went first semi-pro flat track racing and then pro racing for a short time I switched to Triumphs and BSA bikes set up in Champion and Track Master frames. I even bought a old Dick Mann 650 BSA full on flat tracker that I was quite successful on along the Virginia and North Carolina racing venues. I am only sad that I can not throw a leg over a flat tracker to day and go racing, at age 67 I suppose its best I not do that. All that's left of my racing days now is a genuine Ken Maley skid shoe out in the garage, its still in good shape with a long earned patina on it.
 
Joined
May 10, 2011
Messages
8,845
Location
Euless
i had a friend, George Pittman who made his motorcycle out of a 10 speed bicycle and a lawn mower engine with a horizontal out put shaft. His bike used v belts and pullys to make it go. He and I both learned the fine are of brass brazzing or gas welding using clothes hangers for welding rods. He rode that bike everywhere, and as soon as his was running I had to have one too. I chose a old Western Auto Huffy bicycle for mine. I found a horizontal engine and ended up putting the thing together using a torque converter out of a Maytag washing machine as a clutch to get it going. It was not pretty but it ran very good right up to the point where I crashed in a curve on Arroyo Seca here in Austin and tried to knock a fire hydrant over with my unprotected head. The State Trooper whose house was on that corner took me home so my mother could take me to the hospital for stitches to my left eye brow.
A Sears Roebuck moped with shifter on the handlebars and using bicycle style pedals to get it started was my first real motor bike, quickly followed by a 1958 Harley Hummer 125cc two stroke. I rode the wheels off that old faithful motorcycle, and wish I had it back today. I rode Harleys for years and years mostly staying with the Sportster 883cc. When I went first semi-pro flat track racing and then pro racing for a short time I switched to Triumphs and BSA bikes set up in Champion and Track Master frames. I even bought a old Dick Mann 650 BSA full on flat tracker that I was quite successful on along the Virginia and North Carolina racing venues. I am only sad that I can not throw a leg over a flat tracker to day and go racing, at age 67 I suppose its best I not do that. All that's left of my racing days now is a genuine Ken Maley skid shoe out in the garage, its still in good shape with a long earned patina on it.
That's fantastic.
 
Joined
Oct 6, 2012
Messages
46
Location
Flower Mound, TX
i had a friend, George Pittman who made his motorcycle out of a 10 speed bicycle and a lawn mower engine with a horizontal out put shaft. His bike used v belts and pullys to make it go. He and I both learned the fine are of brass brazzing or gas welding using clothes hangers for welding rods. He rode that bike everywhere, and as soon as his was running I had to have one too. I chose a old Western Auto Huffy bicycle for mine. I found a horizontal engine and ended up putting the thing together using a torque converter out of a Maytag washing machine as a clutch to get it going. It was not pretty but it ran very good right up to the point where I crashed in a curve on Arroyo Seca here in Austin and tried to knock a fire hydrant over with my unprotected head. The State Trooper whose house was on that corner took me home so my mother could take me to the hospital for stitches to my left eye brow.
A Sears Roebuck moped with shifter on the handlebars and using bicycle style pedals to get it started was my first real motor bike, quickly followed by a 1958 Harley Hummer 125cc two stroke. I rode the wheels off that old faithful motorcycle, and wish I had it back today. I rode Harleys for years and years mostly staying with the Sportster 883cc. When I went first semi-pro flat track racing and then pro racing for a short time I switched to Triumphs and BSA bikes set up in Champion and Track Master frames. I even bought a old Dick Mann 650 BSA full on flat tracker that I was quite successful on along the Virginia and North Carolina racing venues. I am only sad that I can not throw a leg over a flat tracker to day and go racing, at age 67 I suppose its best I not do that. All that's left of my racing days now is a genuine Ken Maley skid shoe out in the garage, its still in good shape with a long earned patina on it.
Great read. I too am 67. Had Hummer for my first and a BSA 650 Lightning later. Never race but wanted to. Main thing is we are still ridding. Keeps us young.
 
Joined
Apr 2, 2003
Messages
458
Location
Cedar Park Texas
Thats what counts to me. My current ride is a 2012 FJR with 56K on it to now. The 2003 FJR I bought went to trade on the 2012. The 2003 had just a slight less than 200,000 miles on it. Central Texas Powersports gave me something like 5500.00 on it for trade. It was still running great. The 2012 model will probably be worn out about the same time I am.
 
Joined
Oct 13, 2007
Messages
2,034
Location
Georgetown,TX.
1968-69 Tulsa, There was a kid with a Suzuki 50 black and chrome and I still remember his name Stan Mulder, He was like the Fonz, rode the snot out of that Suzuki, He would do jumps up the side of scraper hills at least 6 ft in the air and to the rest of us kids that was the coolest thing on the planet, around the same time "Then came Bronson" was new on TV, my first bike was the 70 Mini Trail 50 and my cousin had a new 70 DT1, He would let me ride it and take me for rides at night under the lights, that sound and pull of the motor and for some reason those twin analog gauges that lit up really moved me, I think that's why I still prefer analog vs digital today, it's sad that the two stroke street legal bikes went away, I really miss them.
 

Texasrider58

Forum Supporter
Joined
Feb 1, 2016
Messages
193
Location
Mineral Wells
I would say the credit would have to go my grandfather Cate. When I was young, I looked forward to visiting my grandparents in Clyde,Tx. My grandfather and part of the family back when had ridden bikes. He had ridden Indians which I have a picture of my grandmother's brother Jesse on a dresser Indian back in the day. Looks a lot like the new ones. As we would go visit, the highlight of the trip was getting to ride on grandfather Harley. I think it was around 1960 when he switched to harleys. He loved to take us kids on rides. He passed on way to early in life from pnuemonia. I always had my memories of life back then. The memories lived on thru the stories my grandmother would tell me of the trips. I believe it was in 1965 that he bought his last bike. I believe it was the first year for Harley to have electric start. Someone might correct me here. Two of their kids, my uncle and an aunt lived in California. My uncle in the navy in San Diego and my in a town north of LA. They made trips on the bike out to visit. My grandmother would relay the stories of their adventures. My dad and I would ride horses between church services and I was into to play days and riding clubs back in the days. I guess my grandfather's influence played a part and around 15 yrs old, told dad I wanted a bike. Course we spent a lot of time doing things together. The change would interrupt things. Sold the horse and he bought me my first of many bikes, a 1970 CL100 Honda and I have been riding ever since. After I got the bike, a week later, he came home with 73 TS125 Suzuki and our time spent together continued for a few yrs. He eventually quit riding. My grandmother telling me about their travels back then, seemed to develop my interest in Harleys. I often wonder had my grandfather lived into my later teens, his influence would have prompted me to get a Harley way early in life. We all have our influences and those experiences seem to sway in life. I wish I could have had a chance to take a few road trips with the person I admired and had a lot of respect for. I sit here a little teary eyed thinking of what a dream it would have been to share a few road trips together doing something we both truly enjoyed doing. I am 57 now and 16 bikes later and a new ultra to boot. I have an interest in adv bikes, so, the influences continue on.
 
Joined
Oct 13, 2007
Messages
2,034
Location
Georgetown,TX.
"I believe it was in 1965 that he bought his last bike. I believe it was the first year for Harley to have electric start. Someone might correct me here."

Texas rider, 65 was the first year for electric start and last year for the Pan head so your Grandfather had a very unique bike, Thanks for sharing.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jun 13, 2006
Messages
4,965
Location
Lewisville
Morgan,
That's great storytelling.
I never came back to this thread until now. Thanks. I wasn't even trying. I can tell a good story when the time calls for it. LOL

A funny thing about my nervous mother.

Back when I moved to Texas in 2000 I had a ZX 11. I sold it when I got here because I moved from North Dakota and I was more than a little nervous about riding in Dallas-Fort Worth. I also had a couple bills to pay. So I was without a motorcycle for a brief period of time. My mother said to me, "if you buy another motorcycle, don't tell me about it I don't want to know." So a couple years later she and my dad flew down for a visit. I pick them up at the airport. When I got to my house attempted to drop them off in the front of the house rather than in back where the garages. My wife said, "just go around back like we normally do." I had forgotten to tell her what I was doing and why. So I drove around back with everybody and open the garage door and there was the new motorcycle for mom to see. She gave me a very dirty look. I said, "I tried to not tell you about it!" LOL
 
Joined
Oct 13, 2007
Messages
2,034
Location
Georgetown,TX.
My Mom never wanted me to get a bike either but after 45 years of riding she has come to accept it, her visits are rare as she lives in Okla and we in Georgetown but when she does come to see us I ask her to put her hands on my bike, to lay hands on it so to speak, it makes that bike so much more special to me to have Mom touch it for some reason, it means the world to me.
 
Joined
Apr 22, 2016
Messages
180
Location
Austin, TX
My dad. I grew up working on cars and such. About when I was 9 he dragged home a Cushman Eagle scooter carcass and we spent weekends trolling for parts - hardest one was the clutch. We put it all together and that big old thumper sounded purdy. About that time my dad got orders to Vietnam and we parked it out at my grandma's house. He made me promise to start it once a week and gas it when I mowed the yard. So I did, and the second time I did I remembered him saying that tires would rot just sitting. Well.... I couldn't let that happen to those nice whitewalls could I? So up the highway I went with it. Did this ritual for months taking this thing up the long hill, double-clutching to get it into 2nd (only had 2 speeds) and that would be around 60 mph or so. Finally an Alabama State Trooper apparently did a double-take and came back around to pull me over. I explained I was following dad's orders while he was in Vietnam. He said he would escort me back home and didn't expect to see me doing it again. So I took the long way home with him following along a curvy back road. We pulled up to my grandma's house and she came out to see why there was a trooper with me. He explained there wasn't a problem and he turned to me and said "mind traffic and take good care of your dad's bike" - and he took off. Of course I took that to mean I could keep doing it and in fact he saw me one other time and waved.
I miss those days and and I miss my dad.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Apr 22, 2016
Messages
180
Location
Austin, TX
This is the wonderful stories that help to interest more former riders to get back in the saddle. It seems that there are a bunch of us that rode a lot got away from it to raise kids then dove back into it head first. Once motorcycles get in your blood it is hard to eradicate. KP
Amen, but I'd like to add that there are drivers and there are riders. Folks at work thing I'm bat-poop crazy for riding every single day rain shine or otherwise. I tell them I prefer it to all other modes of transportation. I'm in the middle of all creation and not put away in a can. Then there are the folks to whom a motorcycle is nothing more than an accessory to an imagined lifestyle - I won't mention any brands ;)
 

jfink

Forum Supporter
Joined
May 29, 2007
Messages
3,105
Location
Conroe, Tx
Who got me into motorcycles? I can't think of anybody in my family or friends who rode. So I guess it was the salesman in the local Kawasaki shop. Passed the shop twice a day to and from work. Stopped in one day and saw this 1974 H1/Mach III and it didn't take much talking to get me out the door with that bike. After that, as they say, the rest is history.
 
Joined
Apr 22, 2016
Messages
180
Location
Austin, TX
Who got me into motorcycles? I can't think of anybody in my family or friends who rode. So I guess it was the salesman in the local Kawasaki shop. Passed the shop twice a day to and from work. Stopped in one day and saw this 1974 H1/Mach III and it didn't take much talking to get me out the door with that bike. After that, as they say, the rest is history.
That was the triple two-stroke, right? That's one of only two bikes that has surprised me. My cousin Ricky got one. I twisted the throttle and that dang thing almost came out from under me. Dead quiet, super quick.
 
Joined
Nov 13, 2007
Messages
1,483
Location
Sugar Land, TX
My 98 year old grandma. Bought us a Honda 185s three wheeler in 1983. Couldn't get me off that "Deathmobile" at age 11, except by bribing me with a 1983 Kawasaki KD80M dirt bike in exchange for a successful year of good grades. That led to over 150 bikes I've owned over 34 years of riding and wrenching. Ugggh, the sickness. How different might my life have been????????
 
Joined
Apr 22, 2016
Messages
180
Location
Austin, TX
We were living in Rome, and my dad came home with a 50cc Garelli streetbike. He taught my brother and I how to ride it around the apartment driveway and he would ride it to the office during the week. After a few weekends of circling the apartment I got bored and headed off into the city traffic. I was 13 and exporing the city - from the Vatican to Via Veneto and eventually off piste on some great trails with my buddy Jean Scott. I've been riding ever since ... THANKS DAD!!!!
If you learned your skills in Rome you're safe anywhere on the planet!
 
Joined
Nov 25, 2012
Messages
16,874
Location
Lampasas
Who got me into motorcycles? I can't think of anybody in my family or friends who rode. So I guess it was the salesman in the local Kawasaki shop. Passed the shop twice a day to and from work. Stopped in one day and saw this 1974 H1/Mach III and it didn't take much talking to get me out the door with that bike. After that, as they say, the rest is history.
Would you have a picture lying around somewhere of the Kawasaki?
 
Joined
Nov 25, 2012
Messages
16,874
Location
Lampasas
Watched "Why We Ride" yesterday night and wanted to thank my dad who has went on to the big motorcycle graveyard in the sky years ago. He is the reason I ride today. Was thinking about him throwing gravel on me on the last ride just up the road we did on the SL and KE. Thanks dad for everything you taught me,miss you.
 

Valker

Forum Supporter
Joined
Feb 5, 2004
Messages
2,299
Location
Pampa
The State of Texas. In 1968, I was 14. Motorcycle license-yes. Car license-16.
 

Yeeha! Stephen

Forum Supporter
Joined
Nov 22, 2003
Messages
1,932
Location
Bedford Texas
The State of Texas. In 1968, I was 14. Motorcycle license-yes. Car license-16.
Couple of years before that you could get your car license at 14 with Drivers Ed.

I don't know the exact situation back then, but our school district had a special Drivers Ed course over the summer... so I got my car license AND my MC license at 14 and I was still in JR High. Got my first car the next summer at age 15. Thanks Texas!
 

Liteitup

Forum Supporter
Joined
Oct 21, 2010
Messages
1,423
Location
Waco TX
In the 70's you could get something called a hardship license if your parents signed off. I think that let you drive a car to work and back;-)at 15. Wasn't a chance in hades that was happening at my house:giveup:.
 
Top