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Wrong Way 'Round the Bend 2011

Joined
Jul 2, 2007
Messages
720
Location
Austin
First Name
Milton
Last Name
Otto
Day2: Wrong Way 'Round the Bend 2011

........Let's see. Where was I. Oh, yeah..............

Headed towards the Carmens from La Mula. I'll admit, I was excited

1205411961_nd8F6-L-2.jpg


On the otherside of the locked gate.
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We had the feeling of total isolation. We had passed two signs, one handwritten Cerrado El Paso and the other more formal Prohibito. The particular spot in the Sierras we're headed for is called El Jardin.
1209595050_Tnvwc-L-1.jpg


The "road" hasn't seen a vehicle in a very long time. John blossoms into full glory as he picks our way thru the many unused intersections, working the GPS.
1209595771_JuZU4-L-1.jpg


Tantalizing roads stretched up nearby hills. But how do we get to them?
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The roads were fairly good on top of the hills, but inevitably they descend into gnarly ravines and arroyos.
1209598385_mDZtQ-L-1.jpg


We came to a 4-way intersection, and had to explore all 4 choices before deciding which one was correct. Gnarly roads, then turn-arounds. Back to where we started and try another one. John muttering to himself, tried to explain how the GPS just didn't know automatically which way to go when at a choice of roads.

Cut the c***, John. Get to the point! Just tell me--What do you want me to do? (He's doing an awesome job, and doesn't have to explain GPS limitations. Just get on with it.)

We came to an arroyo and couldn't figure out what happened to the road. There was evidence of recent water. This must be the "low water" the kid talked about back in La Mula . The arroyo was thick with fine sand. Do we really have to go over those football sized rocks? I dismount to pick a line thru the rocks, just in case John says this is the way. John scouts around up ahead. This is the road! The road leaves the arroyo here! I'm skerred. These must be the rocks the kid warned us about. And the sand! But what am I babbling about. This is what adventure riding is, right? We all do this, right? Lookin' fer the right road... comes with the territory, so to speak. Unless you can ride well enough that you don't care if you're on the right road or not. Guess we just weren't there yet.

I lost count. How many arroyos did we cross? How many times did John lead us down an arroyo and exit at some little gap in the brush. I could never have found my way thru this maze without him. My little 1:250 000 topo was useless here.

"What does 'brecha' mean? The GPS is calling this a brecha"
A brecha is... hummmm kinda like a breach in the monte, a break in the brush.
"What does 'vereda' mean? The GPS calls this a vereda.
Vereda means path, like a foot trail.

Photo taken with my iPhone.
1205413519_h9A8M-L-2.jpg


How many times did John lead us down an arroyo and exit at some little gap in the brush?
I could never have found my way thru this maze without him.

1205414468_LZcqr-L-2.jpg


We exit one last arroyo.
Finally, "We're off the track," John declares.
This time, no matter how much backtracking and searching on foot, he can't find the route he'd plotted for us back home. Well, we're on a road, sort of. It probably leads to that house over there. Maybe someone is living there. Yeah. People!

"This is not the road."
1205414149_ArJuJ-L-2.jpg


There's a road! Up that hillside. You see that?
1205413855_PhJrW-L-2.jpg


Pano from John's camera.
1209600370_RNJYc-L-1.jpg


Another pano I stitched together from John's cache of photos.
1205413638_Mn2Gj-XL-1.jpg
 
Joined
Jul 2, 2007
Messages
720
Location
Austin
First Name
Milton
Last Name
Otto
Day2: Wrong Way 'Round the Bend 2011

The house is abandoned.
The gate is locked. A sign proclaims this place Ejido Boquillas.
Now what? It's getting late in the afternoon and I'm almost pooped.
Sleep in the abadoned hacienda?

We come to a locked gate. A sign proclaims this place Ejido Boquillas. The gate's been locked a long long time.
1205415199_Pcey5-L-2.jpg


The house abandoned. I dismount, climb the fence, look for signs of a road. Big eroded gullies and arroyos are all I find.
(another iPhone shot)

1205414915_fEsjz-L-2.jpg


John runs the perimeter on his Honda 600CR while I poke around on the otherside of the gate.
What the heck? Now there's John putting up some road on the far side of the house. That John! I run back to my bike. John returns, "I found a road." (Not the road, but a road.)
Well great. Let's go.

Somehow John's found a way out of the fenced-in compound we've found ourselves in. It's a good road that runs along the Ejido Boquillas fence, then there is a steep bear of a hill, that our little bikes crest with no problem. We run along, ......... but ....... soon the "road" just peters out. We are a little confused. It took no small effort to build the road up that last hill.

Cross-country
But it's open country up here, and we are next to a straight, well cared for fence. It's really good open country so we just head out cross-country, running the fence line. Let's just see where it goes.
Over hill and dale, dodging cactus and yucca plants, dagger plants, kinda nice. Is that a road on the far hillside to the south, on the otherside of the fence? We follow the fence until the terrain becomes less forgiving and starts to get gnarly going downhill.

Once again. Tracker John steps to the plate. "I think I saw a weak fence post back there." We backtrack, well, there was really no other choice.
Dang! John finds this place in the fence line, that's just big enough for a horse or motorcycle to pass thru, where you can undo the barbed wire and let yourself thru.

John closing the gate behind us. Notice the difference in vegetation on the inside of the fence, compared to the outside.
1205415485_MBRSW-L-1.jpg


Sunset, Day 2. On the otherside of the fence line. Who's property is this?
1205415551_JcWXC-L.jpg


We have acres and acres of desert "pasture" to goof around on. Just gotta watch out for gullies, quebradas, or cracks in the terrain. Go up this hill to get a look around. "Lets go over there." I follow John and "over there" is a bluff, where we look down at the abandoned house, Ejido Boquillas!
Ha. That looks familar. We've made a big circle, though now we are a couple hundred feet higher.

It gets dark and I almost loose John in the darkness, meandering around on the hills. John kinda finds a road but he doesn't like it. :giveup:

We finally settle in on a camp spot. John's afraid we'll wake up to guns in our faces. Myself, I would welcome anyone finding us here. Small fire cooks backpacker meal. There's a kazillion stars that night. Watch the constellations wheel around the sky. Much colder here than last night.
 
Joined
Jan 1, 2005
Messages
3,980
Location
Austin
First Name
Richard
Last Name
Gibbens
Hey, Milton's story is so good it even got bobcat to post. Welcome back, bobcat.
 

cdc

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Jul 21, 2004
Messages
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Katy, TX
First Name
Camilo
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Diaz
The story and the pictures are getting better . . .
 
Joined
Jul 2, 2007
Messages
720
Location
Austin
First Name
Milton
Last Name
Otto
Day3: Wrong Way 'Round the Bend 2011

Our campsite, morning, Day3.
1210716729_YjTx6-L-1.jpg


My odo sez we've come 20 miles since our last touch with humanity, the dude back at the house in La Mula.
And that 20 miles includes a lot of backtracking.
According to the gps, we did 106 miles the first day, 62 miles the second, and 16 the third, only 6 of which was forward progress.:suicide:
My little nest. Tents are over-rated.
1224709057_jM2Xa-L.jpg


John strings up his hammock. Since his air mattress is kaput.
1210717199_rJWDN-L.jpg


The day started off with John having a ball tracing cow trails on his GPS.
"This is our route!" He's happy.
This is a cow trail, John.
"This is the route I plotted on Google Maps! We're on the right road."
This is a cow trail, John.

Past some old stuff lying around. We seem to be headed in the right direction alright. Its a beautiful morning.
1210717508_zSd3z-L.jpg


Well what do you know! We're here in El Jardin. The place I visited in 1994 in an Isuzu Trooper.
The water tank.... I remember this water tank.
And we camped right over there.
There will be some houses up on the left.

The water tank at El Jardin. I remembered this water tank. We bathed here 17 years ago.
1210717968_n9pUq-L-1.jpg


I camped right up there on that hill to the left. Next to Elvira's Crack.
1210718244_L7gwm-L-1.jpg


Stuff you might find useful later on. Goat herders shack, El Jardin.
1210718612_y2XmW-L.jpg


Oops. Forgot to get a picture of the goat herders' shack. Here you can see the corral and stables area. The area is called El Jardin.
1210719063_VK8yU-L.jpg


El Jardin.
A view looking down on the goat herders' spread, the dark brown earth in the center of the photo is the stables area.
Our road is to the right. Yes, we have a road now!

1210719573_gH7zL-L.jpg


That canyon up there is called Elvira's Crack.
1210720452_bKvt6-L.jpg


WooHoo. Won't be long now we'll be on Terlingua's porch.
1210720911_u89ik-L.jpg


Cresting the hill beyond the goat herders's shack. El Jardin.
1210721273_LKh2L-L.jpg


We had a road ok. But it was a rough road. I hated it. But I endured with a lot of work. Softball sized rocks and all.
I pointed the canyon out to John.
We'll be leaving out through that canyon, back to the desert floor.
To the road that goes to Boquillas.

We saw some cowboys here, way off in the distance.
1210721721_Dgf2f-L.jpg


But.............. the road deteriorated into a goat trail.
This was getting technical.
We decided to leap frog. John would go do 20 yards or so, then I'd follow. Then he'd go down another 20.

The goat trail and the canyon beyond.
1210722061_uNoBq-XL.jpg


Finally he shouted back. This is it. We can't go down any further.

End of the line.
The goat trail ends in a boulder chute. Just short of the canyon floor.
Man, I hate it when that happens.

1210723062_K8VLR-L.jpg
 
Joined
Apr 4, 2006
Messages
13,848
Location
Arlington, TX
First Name
Bill
Usually I don't read ride reports at all, but this one has me sitting here waiting for the next installment. Very good so far and I can't wait for the rest.
 
Joined
Oct 11, 2008
Messages
45
Location
Athens, TX
First Name
Joanne
I, too, usually don't read ride reports, but this great! Very captivating, humorous, crazy, etc!!! I love it! :rofl:

Thanks for sharing your adventure with us.
 
Joined
Jul 2, 2007
Messages
720
Location
Austin
First Name
Milton
Last Name
Otto
Day3: Wrong Way 'Round the Bend 2011

By Day3 water had become a priority.
We are slow to realize this.

You and I, the people reading this RR, we are all saturated with water. Without even realizing it. Everything seems normal. Take any one of us, take us from our daily lives and pop us into the desert…… and, well…., we’ll do ok. For the 1st day. (Hey, I don’t need much water.) Day 2? Still coastin’. ‘Least that’s the way it seemed to me.

By Day 3 dehydration has come to roost.

We had ridden right by a water tank without much thought. Past the goat herders’ shack of El Jardin, down a rocky road across arid hills, down a goat trail that delivered us to the head of a serious jumble of rock and boulder. We realized we were a long way from out of here. And no water.

John at the head of the boulder chute.


Impasse
Remember the Google Earth photo? Was this where it was taken?

Then there was this picture on the internet. Here's the Link.
1207725097_uVxay-M.jpg
We dismounted and without coordination or plan, we separately scouted the territory. I walked down the canyon, maybe a mile or two, to make sure the way was clear up ahead, provided we got past the boulder chute. It was kinda clear. Near the chute was a horse trail that led from our goat trail over a hill and down a ridge. As tempting as it was, actually the boulder chute looked like a better candidate for passage. By the time I got back to the bikes on the goat trail, I was pretty parched.

The boulder chute and canyon bed.
1210722529_XN3bW-L.jpg


Looks like we’ll have to lower the bikes down the rocks. What do you think, John? You have tie-downs, don’t you?
“What about the horse trail?”

I don’ know. Looked pretty hairy. I’m sure there are those that could ride it down but I don’t think I’m one of them. Maybe we could walk ‘em down.
“Well, I’d rather have the sure footing of the boulders if we’re gonna walk ‘em down. Look, we could follow the GPS tracks back out the way we came in, back through La Mula. Should be easy.”

Negative. We’ve come this far. We ain’t going back. That’s my vote.
“Well..., one thing’s for certain. We - are - out - of - water. If we’re gonna manhandle these bikes down this cascade of boulders, we’re gonna need water. I say we go back to the goat herders’ shack.”

Ahhhh, man! Go back up that road?! Ahhh, man, do we have to?? I don’ wanna.

But the inescapable fact is… we are out of water. John only had a couple of pints left and I had none.

So we got the bikes turned around and headed back to the goat herders’ shack 3 miles back. Going up a steep incline I fall twice in the same spot. On the same wrong line. Each time was a major effort to get the bike rubber-side down. In frustration with the top-heaviness of my bike, I unloaded all my bags right there and left them at the side of the road.

My first pass around the goat herders’ house revealed nada. There was a hose with water in it but the faucet didn’t turn anything on. Must be another cut-off valve. We collapsed in the shade on a 3-foot wide stone “porch” in front of the building. I fell asleep.

“Hey. I found water.” John has discovered a 55-gallon plastic barrel with about 20 gallons of clear water, in back of the house.

Well let’s go!

Making our getaway.
After our raid on the goat herders’ shack.



All water bottles filled, drinking lots and lots of water in the process, we headed back. Back down the gnarly rocky road towards the canyon. It’s getting better…….. isn’t it?

I stop for my bags and drop the bike again. Same d*** spot.
As I’m finishing loading my bags on the bike I hear a curious noise. What tha.... It’s John snoring.

John has fallen asleep in the only shade around. The shade of his bike.
Now that's tired.



There’s a steep hill that requires you to perch yourself at the very crest and make a very sharp, nearly impossible right hand turn with immediate left. Here I fall again. (Fall #4). Further on down the goat trail John falls. I come around the corner to his bike upside down in the rocks below the trail. John sez he went over the handle bars and landed on his helmet.

“Ok. That’ it. We’re done. We are falling too much. I say we take the rest of the day off, camp in the canyon, and start again fresh in the morning.”

Sounds like a plan to me, John. My last fall has pinned my hand brake ON.

Carrying our gear down the boulder chute.


It’s a strange thing. I can’t get enough water. My mouth keeps getting pasty and my tongue sticky. A half pint of water is good for only about 15 minutes. We set up camp in the canyon bed. My lips are cracked and peeling. I have to watch how sticky my mouth feels.

1½ hour walk down the canyon to its exit into the desert, discussing prospective lines. Strangely, there is a truck down at the far end of the canyon. Beat up, horse gate in back, bad tires, rag in the gas tank, but it looks vaguely like a working truck. The pass out to the desert looks impassable to the truck, however. I guess it got trapped up here in the canyon after a flood.

John, you really think we can lower the bikes? You know, I can barely move my bike over 2 feet in my garage.
“Well, we won’t be carrying them UP. Gravity will do most of the work. Oh, I think it’s do-able...... I don’t know if we can do it, but it’s do-able.”

We walk back in the dark. At camp John declines cooked Louisiana red beans & rice. I settle for an avocado instead. Truth be known, I couldn’t bring myself to dump 2½ cups of water into the backpacker’s pouch. Even though, logically, I knew the moisture would be getting into my body.
Water! It's hard to stay hydrated.

Another night under the stars. Wheeling constellations and satellites. This is night #3. It’s warmer in the canyon.
Worried? Yes.
We are so close to the road it's insane.

Walking down the canyon bed.


John’s hammock in the canyon bed.
 
Joined
Nov 20, 2007
Messages
251
Location
Sn. Antonio
First Name
Joel
Last Name
King
A world-class adventure ride all within ~50 miles of Texas border. Nice one guys.
 

JT

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Joined
Sep 11, 2008
Messages
1,599
Location
Elgin
According to the gps, we did 106 miles the first day, 62 miles the second, and 16 the third, only 6 of which was forward progress.:suicide:

1203964299_VATGz-L.jpg
 

cdc

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Camilo
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Diaz
It's "Survivor John"...
 
Joined
Jul 18, 2009
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7,032
Location
T'orndale!
The little "tree" branch" on the passenger side of the Jeep has the exact same bends/kinks as the one in the photo you took....see it??.........You bet, that IS the same arroyo/chute.
Great story, thanks for sharing!
:sun:
 
Joined
Feb 28, 2010
Messages
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Michigan
First Name
Gilbert
The little "tree" branch" on the passenger side of the Jeep has the exact same bends/kinks as the one in the photo you took....see it??.........You bet, that IS the same arroyo/chute.
Great story, thanks for sharing!
:sun:
Someone has a eye for detail.:clap:I can't wait for todays update.
 
Joined
Aug 26, 2005
Messages
123
Location
Caldwell County
That's me! Hi Lori! :wave:
Wow. Not sure why a real adventure dude like you wanted to head north with a wimp like me. I don't think my machine has ever been out of the stable overnight except for Junction...
The older I get, the slower I ... well, everything is just slower:doh:
 
Joined
Jul 14, 2005
Messages
838
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Leander
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Robert
Last Name
Krull
I saw Tracker/Adventure John at lunch yesterday and he acted like it was just a really nice ride around the park! Maybe for those two it was but I think I might have been a bit worried at times. Especially when a pickup with armed dudes in it want to stop and have a talk. But you know, we never have found out more about the toilet paper situation. But on the other hand I think maybe we really don't want to know more about that.
 
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53 sMiles south of Alpine
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Voni
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Glaves
Yes. He's sure got a lot of us on edge of our seats.

We sure do appreciate a good story.

I don't think I could stand the suspense if it was coming to us LIVE!:sun:

Voni
sMiling
 
Joined
Jul 2, 2007
Messages
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Austin
First Name
Milton
Last Name
Otto
Day4: Wrong Way 'Round the Bend 2011

We had learned an important lesson yesterday.
Never pass on an opportunity to top off with water.
Or gas.
You just never know.

Saturday morning. Day 4. We are still in the Sierra del Carmen. Tantalizing close to the exit, but nonetheless still here in the El Jardin canyon. We get right to it, collecting our gear for the big day. Getting ready to hike up the chute to our bikes and attempt to inch them down, one at a time, with one guy on a tie-down attached to the rear of the bike, the other guiding the front wheel with the hand brake. Oh, Gaahhd. Duct tape the two tie-downs together. Be sure to bring your gloves.

Yesterday there’d been some discussion about the abandoned truck. Tracker John had commented on the truck tracks in the canyon bed.

There’re no truck tracks in the canyon, had been my first response. Those are horse tracks.

But on closer inspection I had to admit that the two “horse” trails were extremely uniform in their apartness. Examining the canyon bed gravel on the up-canyon side of where the horse trail left the canyon floor, I, indeed, noted compacted gravel consistent with a truck’s passing, not all that long ago. John was right. Now the question was, where was that truck going, up-canyon?

This morning, when I reached the chute, John had left sign that he was exploring further up the canyon. I walked up a ways, found another, more gentle horse or cow trail, but following it further up the hill the terrain got all funky and the horse (or cow) trail(s) petered out. When I got back to the bikes at the top of the chute, John was there. He had passed me while I was exploring up the hill.

My bike on the goat path, the canyon leads to open desert.


“I found the road!”
What???
"I found the road! And it’s on one of my GPS maps!!”
You found a road?!!? Like a “road” road? “The” road????

Well son-of-a-gun! If that just don’t beat all!
John has certainly proved to be handy on this little adventure. He has picked his way thru this Sierra del Carmen single-handedly. Heck I’m just along for the ride. Really. What have I done? My role on this trip has turned into something like “Cultural Advisor”. Or Translator maybe. John’s the one who found the water yesterday, got us this far with his GPS and tenacity. He’s the one who helps me pick up my top-heavy bike when I fall down. And now he’s discovered the way out of here?

Yup. John you’re pretty handy to have around alright.
Hey, John, you can use my toilet paper any 'ole time.

The missed track, where we lost the road, was right where I fell the 4th time yesterday. Where we took that extremely difficult right, that led us down the goat trail. We were so intent on exiting out the canyon, and that seemed to be the way to the canyon. However. If we’d looked left... away from the canyon….An easier gentle left up the hill led us initially away from the canyon, but eventually down to the canyon floor. Why, the road even had vestiges of concrete! Oh, this was the right road alright.

What joy! Now we only had a mile or three of deep sand and fine gravel river bottom to plow thru.

Our campsite. Take a break, eat some jerky, drink water.
Hey, our bikes are on the canyon bed... with us!



While packing we met a couple of cowboys on horseback, coming up the canyon with a mule. We asked if they lived in the house we’d raided yesterday. No, they lived out in the desert. We talked about water and gasoline and Jaboncillos. They were kool and eventually wandered on.

Off we go, paddling down the canyon bed, struggling in the sand.
Kind of loping along taking giant steps, plowing thru, my feet just wouldn’t stay on the pegs. Who wants to fall down again?
Exhausting, but we were moving. :rider:

We still have some serious obstacles.


We have to dismount and scout our way thru the rocks. At one point we even have to walk our bikes one at a time.
John takes a fall off a boulder. Trying to walk his bike alone, the bike went up the boulder until it was way over his head and came crashing down upside down... again. :eek2:

Struggle, pant and rest... Drink water.
Move a little more. Pant and rest. Drink more water.
Move a litle more. Repeat, repeat and repeat.



Walking my line before I ride it.


A little technical here.


But we make it.


The last unlocked gate. We are officially out of the canyon.


The cowboys told us there was a deposit of water on the other side of the gate.
Guess this is it but the tank didn’t have a spigot.
The water was just a trickle but enough to take a cooling bath.

1214322703_gGM4j-L.jpg


The Sierra del Carmen from the water tank.
We did it!!! We crossed the Sierra del Carmen! :nana:
Elvira’s Crack on the left and our canyon on the right.



It was a lot further out to the main road than I expected. Still, we were moving.


Another pano from John’s camera.


Jaboncillos. Center of town, I think.
 
Joined
Jul 2, 2007
Messages
720
Location
Austin
First Name
Milton
Last Name
Otto
Day4: Wrong Way 'Round the Bend 2011

Jaboncillos. [say: HAH-bone-SEE-yos]
Jaboncillos is straight south of the town of Boquillas on the rio, where you can, or used to be able to cross over from Big Bend NP.



At the square, in an old lady's kitchen I drink 2 jugos (Jugomex fruit juices), 3-4 glasses of water, and one coke. John does the same. The lady is preparing our meal before I even ask her for it. Eggs scrambled with chorizo, whole beans cooked with onions on the side, and hand squeezed chili peppers. Flour tortillas. They get the silverware out special for us. Two spoons.

Re-hydrating at the little lady's house/store in Jaboncillos.
1214327295_gpQdT-L.jpg


This kid must have been the lady’s grandson or nephew or something. She bossed him around pretty good.


Outside it is blistering hot. We dined behind the screen door with green trim.


Outside the lady’s house.


Never pass up a chance to top off with water and gasoline.
We refilled our water bottles from a bucket in the kitchen. I couldn’t pass up buying a jumbo can of fruit cocktail from the lady's shelves and stashing it in a saddlebag.
Food, water, next is gas. Oh, yeah and don't forget directions.

Our gas stop. They were harvesting the candelilla plant here. The kids showed me big sacs of processed wax inside the house.
See more info on this intereting process.



John told me the kid from the lady’s house was so proud of his calves.
(If you haven’t already figured it out, I’m posting John’s photos as well as my own.)



This guy named off some towns when we told him we were headed to Ojinaga.
John checks his GPS, sez, “Well, that’s not the route I have picked on my GPS, but I think I’ll re-route the GPS to follow those names.
I’ll roger that, Tracker. I've had enough adventure for a while. Let’s go home.
We procure gas and we’re off.



Wax camp sites.
 
Joined
Jul 2, 2007
Messages
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Location
Austin
First Name
Milton
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Otto
Day4: Wrong Way 'Round the Bend 2011

One last goodbye to the Sierra del Carmen. John shot this image from the main road leading south out of Boquillas, which passes Las Norias and Jaboncillos.


El Milagro. This is all there is to the place name on the map, El Milagro.
It’s a crossroads.



Amazingly we hit a stretch of new pavement leading out of El Milagro. We had our hopes up high.


But…… the pavement is short-lived. At San Miguel we pick up huge power lines and follow them for a while.


55 miles from Benavides you can see Big Bend NP clearly - from the south side of the river.
In this photo you can make out the Sierra Quemada, Emory Peak, the South Rim and even the tip of Elephant Tusk.
Nice shot, John.



Ahhhh, it’s Saturday night and we want so much to be in Terlingua.
John is charging for the barn. I’m tired.
Then I have a flat front tire. I’ve been hitting some pretty big rocks at speed. Luckily the pressure holds with re-inflating only.
Near Alamos del Marquez we stop for one more night out. We’re getting good at this.
 

JT

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Joined
Sep 11, 2008
Messages
1,599
Location
Elgin
Here is the route. We were always within 40 miles of the border.
1215397190_b6qni-XL.jpg


 

JT

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Joined
Sep 11, 2008
Messages
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Location
Elgin
John, what software are you using for the Mex topos?

Thanks,

Joel.
The images above are the Bicimaps v5.3, I think 6.1 is current. I have the 2011 E32 also and If I could only have one, I prefer the E32.
 
Joined
Nov 20, 2007
Messages
251
Location
Sn. Antonio
First Name
Joel
Last Name
King
Thanks for the reply. I'd been wondering if Bicimaps was reasonably detailed and accurate in that part of the world. Looks like they are.

Regards,

Joel.
 
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